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Hopping Exercise

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Something finally clicked yesterday during a lesson.

An instructor had us do turns down the hill and at the run accross the fall line we had to hop up and down slightly on the skis right before turning again. The goal was to show us how proper centering and balancing makes turn initation much easier and more efficient. He told us unless your hips remain balanced somewhere over the arches of your feet where they should be you won't be able to get airborne. You also have to keep your uppy body still as well or when you come down you will be way out of balance on one or both skis. At first I though it was silly but after a run of doing this it was a breakthrough.

I think I finally figured out the concept of centering and keeping the upper body still and how it aids in turn initiation. - I always heard about it and it seems so basic but never really did it. It is very subtle but one of those things you know when you feel it - pressure from the top down onto the skis. Very little work to turn, little skidding, and smooth. I also learned the difference between rotating the waist and the upper body when countering and not letting the shoulders turn with the skis. The shoulders move into the turn rather than with it if I keep them paralell to the skis.

Very helpfull exercise that really shed light on some concepts I was missing. If you are an intermediate like myself give this exercise a try.
post #2 of 6
Use this one all the time.

Especially with kids. They love the action. It's lots of fun and they really get centered. For basketball players tell them to take a "jump shot" at every turn completion.

DC
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
It sure clicked with me. It really imprinted the concept of centering and balance that I never really understood. After a couple runs another skier and I were really getting into it. We felt a little silly but it is one of those copncept you here a lot about but some folks like me I guess you eventually have to learn by doing.

Another guy in the group was all ticked off. Most of our 2 hours was spent with exercises and he left the group halfway through complaining that he wanted to learn to 'ski better' and not play around.
post #4 of 6
sxm,

Quote:
Another guy in the group was all ticked off. Most of our 2 hours was spent with exercises and he left the group halfway through complaining that he wanted to learn to 'ski better' and not play around.
Too bad he has fogotton how to play, and that we learn best by playing. If we only learn by being told what to do, we are missing a lot (of fun).

RW
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkierXMan
Another guy in the group was all ticked off. Most of our 2 hours was spent with exercises and he left the group halfway through complaining that he wanted to learn to 'ski better' and not play around.
I don't blame him. No two-hour lesson should be devoted mostly to exercises. Every exercise should be followed with a run to try to add the feeling of the exercise to "real" skiing. The focus of the exercise should get replayed on a variety of terrain to see if it works for the students. Paraphrasing Bob Barnes, exercises are not skiing.
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
we did...the guy never waited around . After about 40 minutes the instructor said he didnt look comfortable and they talked and the guy just left. I dont know if he got a refund or what. He just kept complaining on the lift that this was 'bullsh*&' etc. He wasnt happy but I dont know what he wanted with just 2 hours time.

The 2nd hour we spent putting the skills into practice. We also got a freebie lesson for half an hour as our instructor was waiting for the Downhill Race on OLN at 5:00 and had a half hour to kill.
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