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Parrallel tracking question?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
My wife says that when I'm skiing straight down the fall line (easy slope on which I'm not trying to turn or shed speed, just run straight) my skis are in a bit of a wedge. When I force the skis to true parallel I feel I'm not standing naturally. Any ideas as to what's going on here?
post #2 of 17
your a pidgeon?...

I saw the ostrich on skis...
post #3 of 17
try spreading your arms for balance
post #4 of 17
Ok - so if not a pidgeon are you pidgeon toed? or knock-kneed or some such?

Did she say a wedge as in toes together? or have you both inside edges engaged in snow?

Are your legs "straight" (in line from hips) when you do this?

How does it feel/what does it look like if you focus on skis flat on snow and straight ahead? Is it different to above?

(I have no idea but these are questions I am thinking my instructors might ask if i said what you just did)
post #5 of 17
You've described a common boot alignment problem. If you find an alignment specialist and get your boots better adjusted to your body, you'll likely discover an amazing improvement in your skiing. Skiing without your alignment adjusted would be (cough) "riskier" than it needs to be.
post #6 of 17
riskier,
take therusty's advice!

RW
post #7 of 17
I second what rusty says. I am not anywhere near his level but figured out the importance of proper balancing this through firsthand experience.

I had the same problem for my first 2 years on skis. I attended the ESA event and had my boots canted the day before at PJ Deweys ski shop in Stowe. I was 2 degrees off on each foot. No more of the 'pidgeon toed' stance after the cant and I was tracking straight.

Watch out after you get your boots canted though. They feel totally different(especially if you are 2 degrees off) and you need to get used to the new feel as your feet get aclimated to the revised stance. I was so used to pushing my medial walls in to get flat(which was making me wedge slightly most of the time) that I kept doing that subconsciously and was all over the place for a while and kept grabbing my inside edge the first day. Took a couple pretty good spills. After that though it was much better and smoother and my skis felt flat. It is night and day.
post #8 of 17
Boot alignment.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'm not pidgeon toed and I don't feel that I have the skis on edge. When I bought my boots they did an in shop alignment. Assuming it's an alignment issue could anyone recommend a good place to go for correction? I live in RI and would like to be able to do it as a day trip (e.g., Boston area, southern NH) as I don't have lots of vacation days to spare, right now. If I have to go further nNorth, I'll have to go further North. Thanks!
post #10 of 17
The correction is boot alignment (footbeds) The problem is that your arches are collapsing inside the boots allowing your femurs to roll the legs towards the inside. Your boots are probably to large and you need footbeds.

Your challenge is finding a boot tech that will build footbeds that will provide the support needed to keep your knees aligned when standing in boots. That requires some real knowledge of how to build footbeds. In my opinion, 97% of all footbed builders do not know what they are really doing.
post #11 of 17
repeat... Boot alignment. Pierre mentions footbeds. I strongly agree that you (everyone) should have custom footbeds, but in most cases, there is additional boot work that may be needed to get you properly aligned.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Well, I have custom footbeds. Don't know if they were made correctly or not. And the boots where shell fit. While they are not racing tight I can feel my toes touching the toe box when I'm just standing up in the boot. My foot doesn't move around in the boot at all. So what's canting?
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RISkier
Well, I have custom footbeds. Don't know if they were made correctly or not. And the boots where shell fit. While they are not racing tight I can feel my toes touching the toe box when I'm just standing up in the boot. My foot doesn't move around in the boot at all. So what's canting?
if you are touching the front when standing but toes are not touching when you are flexed in the boot then it sounds like the boot length is correct. if you are not "crammed" into the boot left right, and held firmly then it sounds like you have a correct width boot.

Canting is the adjustment first of the cuff so when you are standing flat in the boot, your tib/fib or shins come up out of the boot centered in the cuff. This is generally done in the shell with no liner. You put your footbed in the shell on the boot board, set the width of your stance, then look at if the shin bones and lower legs are centered between the edges of the cuff.

After that, you put the footbeds and liners back in the boot, and put the boots on. Set your stance width and now you look at where the knee is in relatation to the center of the boot. If the knee is not plumb with the center of the boot, an adjustment (usually either cant strips or planing) to the bottom of the boot is made to get your knees over the center of the foot.

DC
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RISkier
Well, I have custom footbeds. Don't know if they were made correctly or not. And the boots where shell fit. While they are not racing tight I can feel my toes touching the toe box when I'm just standing up in the boot. My foot doesn't move around in the boot at all. So what's canting?
How did the boot fitter make the footbeds. Can you please describe the method is as much detail as you remember. That will give me a good idea whether you have a comfort fit or a performance footbed.
post #15 of 17
Since when is it neccessary to have to "FORCE" today's skis to true parallel on as easy slope? Pigeon....quite possible...
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
As I recall, the footbeds were first heated and then the fitter had me stand on the beds for a while to mold them to my feet -- they weren't cheap. Any alignment was never checked in the shell alone, it was done with the liner in my boot. Then he had a plumb from my knees and made a couple of adjustments to the boot. I was never on skis when this was done and there was no shimming or anything like that. I'm probably making more of this than I should, it's likely just me, but I would like to find someone who could really check this out for me.
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RISkier
As I recall, the footbeds were first heated and then the fitter had me stand on the beds for a while to mold them to my feet -- they weren't cheap. Any alignment was never checked in the shell alone, it was done with the liner in my boot. Then he had a plumb from my knees and made a couple of adjustments to the boot. I was never on skis when this was done and there was no shimming or anything like that. I'm probably making more of this than I should, it's likely just me, but I would like to find someone who could really check this out for me.
I strongly suspect that when your footbed maker made the footbeds, he did not have you rotate the bones in the feet to straighten the knees as you stood on the mold. As a result, the footbeds support the arch but do not rotate the knees into alignment. When placed in ski boot the result is the arch does not collapse but the knees still rotate in. This has the effect of edging the skis on their inside edges and the skis want to ski towards one another in a wedge.

Making footbeds is serious business and a thorough evaluation of each skiers feet and stance is essential to making a footbed that not only supports but corrects alignment issues. I find that 97% of all footbed makers achieve comfort but shoot in the dark on alignment. It takes me a couple of hours to do the job right for each skier that I see.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Parrallel tracking question?