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ski underwear

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
I want to find out if you have those moisture wicking, breathable termo underwear. What is the merit to wear those?

Normally, I do not wear long underwear pants and on the top, I have normal cotton shorts with layers of sweat shirts, fleece shells and ski parka. I never had any problem with that kind of setup.
post #2 of 34
I don't wear cotton while skiing, or any other outdoor activity.
Thermals, if very cold fleece and some sort of membrane shell on top.

The merrit is that it keeps you dry and thus warm.
post #3 of 34
Cotton? Ugh!!! Holds moisture like a wet towell, which is because it pretty much is a wet towell. I can't stand any cotton on, even if it's an insullated layer two layers above ski.

Go with a wicking synthetic. It will breath better (let's moisture escacpe) which helps you from over heating and sweating when are being aggressive (e.g. bumps) yet it retains its insulation when you need to stay warm.

By the way, Patagonie Capeline is great stuff if you have the $$$ for it. Silk-like comfort on the skin, breaths, and stays just warm enough.
post #4 of 34
Cotton kills..

warm weather
top-wicking t-neck to fleece to shell type jacket
bottom-wicking long underwear to light sweatpants to waterproof/windproof pant/bib

cold weather
top-wicking fleece t-neck to fleece pullover to insulated/waterproof/windproof jacket
bottom-wicking long underwear to fleece type sweatpants to waterproof/windproof pant/bibs

the wicking will make 2nd layer or 3rd layer feel damp..fleece will keep ya warm..waterproof/windproof jacket/shell will keep element out..

can always add but over wicking not under
can alway remove but not wicking
post #5 of 34

If you don't like to wear long johns

(and I don't either- don't like the calf portion overlapping with my socks under my boots) then try some coolmax or other non-cotton briefs. Nashbar (bicycle accessory e-tailer) and others sell perforated Coolmax-Lycra briefs & boxer-briefs. Once you try some, you may realize just how much you sweat down there over a ski day.
post #6 of 34
Try SierraTradingPost.com for good prices on synthetic underwear. Avold cotten.
post #7 of 34
This year I purchased a couple of pairs of the 3/4 length base layers.


Perfect. That leaves just my thin wool sock under the boot.

In the past I have used my running tights (synthetic, polyester, lycra, spandex) that worked fine, but the heavy elastic cuff created a problem with me an my new, snugger boots.

I have also used panty hose, not sure about the wicking properties of these garments, but they were thin and seemed to not do nothing in terms of warmth.

Capiliene or Chillis are good too
post #8 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn
By the way, Patagonie Capeline is great stuff if you have the $$$ for it. Silk-like comfort on the skin, breaths, and stays just warm enough.
I'm liking Patagonia and Capeline more and more. I've bought a few more items this year and they're real good.

Also, if you're going to be in the SLC area, there's a Patagonia Factory Outlet there. I think I'm going to stop by on my way to ESA.
post #9 of 34
Lycra bike shorts for me, and lycra bike tights over those for chilly days. The shorts, underneath my lightly insulated ski pants, are almost always enough.

If you don't want to spend a lot experimenting, Target and Walmart sell polyester athletic T-shirts for under $10. Combine that with a long sleeve mock turtleneck, thin fleece and a shell and I've got a decent layering system.
post #10 of 34
I wear cotton sitting around the house, but if i am doing any sweat producing activities, synthetic all the way. People have died in warm weather wearing cotton clothing. the modern synthetics, help you to regulate sweat evaporation.

Remember, layering is always the way to go. If in doubt, go to a specialty outdoor sports store, like EMS, REI or the like, and talk to the staff there. They can help you detirmine the proper layering based on your body and activity type.
post #11 of 34
Hot-Chillies ... Patagonia ... North Face or EMS .... base layers are good.

Silk ..... freaking cold .... waste of money.

Cotton will do real well if worn under your Levi's ...... just kidding.
post #12 of 34
I still wear a cotton T-neck and briefs when I ski. It may not be the ideal set up, but it is comfortable(I don't sweat a lot). I feel venting options are just as important as insulating. Regulating excess heat could keep your cotton-loving setup viable. When I made the step up to some technical shells, armpit zippers/full-side or rainbow butt zippers for pants elicited "How did I ever live without these" comments. You won't have too much of a problem with your setup doing resort skiing. You'd be in some difficulty in the BC or if you ran into trouble at a resort(overnighter in the elements). Another advantage if you substituted more synthetic for cotton is it will be lighter, too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackwan1
I want to find out if you have those moisture wicking, breathable termo underwear. What is the merit to wear those?

Normally, I do not wear long underwear pants and on the top, I have normal cotton shorts with layers of sweat shirts, fleece shells and ski parka. I never had any problem with that kind of setup.
post #13 of 34
Whens it's mild, I use thin silk only

When the temp drops, I use under armour "Cold Gear", but some people may not like the feel of a compression fit.

Just my.02

Way too much bulk with cotton!
post #14 of 34
I ski in nothing but silk long johns. Warm and no bulk.

Find a pair at campmore .com for 19$
post #15 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sablotny
(and I don't either- don't like the calf portion overlapping with my socks under my boots) then try some coolmax or other non-cotton briefs. Nashbar (bicycle accessory e-tailer) and others sell perforated Coolmax-Lycra briefs & boxer-briefs. Once you try some, you may realize just how much you sweat down there over a ski day.
Whatever happened to stirrup-leg long underwear? I have a pair of these in Polarmax that I swear by, but no one seems to make these anymore. The stirrup eliminates the overlap with the calf portion of the socks and also makes it easier to layer your liner and outer socks without causing the underwear to ride up.
post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by typ993
Whatever happened to stirrup-leg long underwear? I have a pair of these in Polarmax that I swear by, but no one seems to make these anymore. The stirrup eliminates the overlap with the calf portion of the socks and also makes it easier to layer your liner and outer socks without causing the underwear to ride up.
You really don't want all of "this" down in your boots (socks only is my rule), but if you must then Hot Chillys still makes what you're looking for.
post #17 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackwan1
I want to find out if you have those moisture wicking, breathable termo underwear. What is the merit to wear those?

Normally, I do not wear long underwear pants and on the top, I have normal cotton shorts with layers of sweat shirts, fleece shells and ski parka. I never had any problem with that kind of setup.
Except for the really warm spring days, my bottom doesn't sweat at all, unlike all the rest of the body. So, cotton shorts work for me as well. But, OTOH, a cotton sweat shirt!? I might as well wrap myself in a wet towel.
post #18 of 34
I wear Patagonia midweight capilene, top and bottom. Usually just that, a t-shirt and my shell and pants (non-insulated) and I'm fine on all but the coldest days. When the temp drops into the low-teens I'll put on either an expedition weight top or some other similar synthetic fleece insulation. Never on the bottom, though.

I tend to run warm, though.

As far as cotton, it's terrible as a base layer. I kind of like wearing a t-shirt over my long-underwear top, though.

I used to hold the opinion that cotton was "death cloth". And, while on some backpacking/camping situations I still believe that to be true, not so much in skiing...especially when you're at a resort. I mean, c'mon, it's not like resorts are really "roughing" it in the backcountry. But as a base layer, it'll absorb sweat and make you cold. Outside of that, unless you're highly cold intolerant, I don't think it's that big of a deal.
post #19 of 34
I have X-undergear LS shirt (energy accumulator). This thing works as advertised.

Jamie
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
I ski in nothing but silk long johns.
Don't you get some funny looks?
post #21 of 34
Patagonia's good, also have found REI's home brand to be well made. Don't think much of Hot Chiles in terms of durability. If you really have issues with sweating followed by getting cold, put a nylon fishnet under some wicking fabric. Creates a warm humid layer of air that wicks more efficiently, keeps your base poly from wetting.
post #22 of 34
Any updated comments to this informative thread???
post #23 of 34
Sure.

In a word: Commando.
post #24 of 34
I use CW-X 3/4 length tights for the bottom (you can also get isulated ones, I don't have them, the regular ones are warm enough for me). Marathon Runners use them most (and how I found out about them). The 3/4 length is perfect as it just comes down to the top of the boot. The interesting thing about Cw-X is it made of different pannels and stretch portions that isolate your muscle groups. I was sceptical at first, but a week of hard skiing everyday made me a believer. Much less leg fatigue (especially the quads) and my knees felt better (it really supports them!).

For the top, just a capilene top usually... But I'm always hot.
post #25 of 34
i free ball it
its the only way to go
post #26 of 34

Without reading the other posts

For a med to think Layer

Patagonia.

For a thin silky layer (Tahoe Sking)

Mountain Hardware.

Socks Dakine Werlino wool and synthetic blend
post #27 of 34
My two cents:

Underwear - Under Armour (Don't retain moisture)
Tops/Bottoms - Snow Skins™, www.skins.net (Best investment I've made, little/no soreness after a week of skiing)
post #28 of 34
Skins and if necessary Icebreaker merino.
post #29 of 34
Insport makes underwear for the Military, excellent wicking.
post #30 of 34
Bottoms: I wear REI's midweight pants cut off just below the knee. Cutting off the bottom portion is less expensive than buying 3/4 length specific pants. Its its colder I'll throw on an OLD pair of fleece pants(cut off below the knee)over my lon underwear. Then my shell ski pants. I couldn't imagine trying to fit my long underwear into my boot and then to get it to lay flat. What a pain.

Top: REI's midweight top. Mountain Hardwear Micro Ozone Zip shirt. Mtn Hardwear Synchro jacket or Exposure jacket depending on weather conditions.
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