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Everyone should have a pure slalom ski in their quiver.

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I wasn't sure if I should post this here or in the gear forum but I decided that this should be a public service announcement.

Everyone should have a pure slalom ski in their quiver. I just spent the last three hours carving up the coral and hard pack on a balmy 40 degree night ski at the Springs. This was the first night ski in many years and the 9S Rossi’s made the effort worth it. I’d been licking my chops over various SLs. I demo the Dynastar Omniglass, coveted cgeib’s Fisher RC4 SCs. I demoed the 9S and 9S oversize. I even considered using my free K2 selection, won at the Eastern Tune up at Stowe last season on a set of Sls but I never tried the Apache Hellfires. I finally bought a used Rossi 9S. Now I’m wondering why I waited so long, these things were glued to the snow, turning was effortless and it was smooth stable and fast.

Wow, now I remember why night skiing is so much fun, those Rossi’s brought back flashes of fun nights in the days of yore.
post #2 of 24
amazing how everyone wants some fat powder ski on hand....good powder days will always be fun, but a slalom ski can salvage a day which most thought was a lost cause.
post #3 of 24
Ski Claws!
I agree, but I've gone one better and got an all-purpose race ski, with a slalom sidecut. The Stockli SC, in my length it's 13.5 radius, but they have that claw feel, brick wall under the foot, speed, nippiness (fantastic in bumps). I don't give a stuff about ice now. Even on my fats, I know what to do, the race skis have given me "the feel". I'm so glad I got them, after years of midfat compromises. The strength and response is incredible and it packs on the fun.
post #4 of 24
Why would I want a shorty slalom ski to keep myself on 'bad' snow days when those days mean I'll have wide open empty groomers that beg to be skied with SG turns? My play skis are some Volkl Superspeeds.
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
Why would I want a shorty slalom ski to keep myself on 'bad' snow days when those days mean I'll have wide open empty groomers that beg to be skied with SG turns? My play skis are some Volkl Superspeeds.
Yeah, you need some of those too.
post #6 of 24
I like having a non-FIS Giant Slalom ski for those hard-snow days. I use the Fischer World-cup RC in a 175cm. This provides a Turn radius of 16 meters. I can lay down turns of all sizes; from fall-line quickies to Super GS sweepers.

Here is my "A" list of hard snow "race carvers & GS Cheaters"

Atomic SX 10 & 11
Atomic GS 9 & 11
Atomic SL 11
Dynastar Speed Course
Elan Ripstick
Fischer RX:9, WC RC, WC SC
Head iXRC 1200 RD
Head iRace
Nordica Speed Machine 16.1 & 14.1
Salomon Equipe GC
Stockli Razorcross
Stockli Razor SC
Volkl GS Racetiger
Volkl Allstar
Volkl 5 Star

Match one of these with a Wide ride, and the skier can rule the mountain!

Cheers,

Michael
post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
Why would I want a shorty slalom ski to keep myself on 'bad' snow days when those days mean I'll have wide open empty groomers that beg to be skied with SG turns? My play skis are some Volkl Superspeeds.
The nights here are consistent freeze/ thaw, a 300 to 700 vertical. We are lucky enough to go over 100 yards wide in a few places. Conditions range from groom granular to refrozen crust-ard with a liberal dose of dirt and ice in unlikely places, couple that with shadows on a surface that looks like a dirty, dead tree moonscape with a starry sky above the halogen blur.

Forgive my exuberance, the ski fit the night.
post #8 of 24
Springhill, these westerners'll never get the passion and power necessary to maintain the level of joy in skiing that ya'll do.

I'm with you, especially given the limitations of climate and terrain that you face.
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Springhill Crazie
The nights here are consistent freeze/ thaw, a 300 to 700 vertical. We are lucky enough to go over 100 yards wide in a few places. Conditions range from groom granular to refrozen crust-ard with a liberal dose of dirt and ice in unlikely places, couple that with shadows on a surface that looks like a dirty, dead tree moonscape with a starry sky above the halogen blur.

Forgive my exuberance, the ski fit the night.
I just love night skiing. No really there's nothing like leaving the warm Halogen glow for pich black can't see your nose.:
post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 
Skiing the glades at night is really spooky too.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Springhill, these westerners'll never get the passion and power necessary to maintain the level of joy in skiing that ya'll do.

I'm with you, especially given the limitations of climate and terrain that you face.
Wrongo. I grew up on what is a relatively small hill (by western standards) in SW Oregon. The runs were steep & narrow, the snow was dense & the runs were always full. It took more effort to carve a turn on what they called packed snow there than it does to carve Montana ice. My friends that are still there have shorty slaloms as their primary skis.

Now that I'm in Montana I find myself giddishly excited whenever the snow conditions are 'bad' because I know that means wide open spaces all to myself to let my skis run. I really enjoy & relish the experience. Yeah, it doesn't require the power but thats the great part.....I can just let my skis go and enjoy the ride.
post #12 of 24
When the powder tracks out and the melt / freeze cycles dominate over new snowfall, the Six stars make an appearance, while the Mantras wait. The contrast makes the skiing that much more exciting. Probably as close as I'll come to having a slalom ski again.
post #13 of 24
No, Hell No. You can keep the slalom skis. No need for them for me unless racing.
post #14 of 24
I sort of agree, but I went for a slightly longer radius Dynastar Course with a 17m sidecut. I have been skiing on midfats for a number of seasons because they work well in the warm mushy slop that we get so often. But since I didn't break my midfats (I rarely have "rock skis" because I end up destroying skis and only have one pair of skis ata time), so I went for a full sidewall race ski. I've been on them twice, both times with early morning firm groomers, and they're a hoot. They hook up a lot more aggressively than the mid fats. The only drawback was the time I decided to drop into a tuck about 2/3 of the way down the trail. I was afraid they'd do something undesireable, so I didn't let myself get going too fast. Now if we could get enough cold weather for them to open the race course, I'd love to see how they do in the gates.
post #15 of 24

X3

168 Stockli SC's for more of a GS (ish) "go fast"

156 Stockli SL .... good on narrow icy stuff

163 Stockli SL "stealth" .... gettin' a bit old but a good back up ski

Actually, If we get a powder dump I'll be in a bit of trouble, but the 168's aren't too bad and the last time we had one Governor Casey of Pennsylvania asked all of the ski areas to shut down anyway.

To the "Gubberner" ...... go and *%$#*# yer' self .... er ... sir!
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Actually, If we get a powder dump I'll be in a bit of trouble, but the 168's aren't too bad and the last time we had one Governor Casey of Pennsylvania asked all of the ski areas to shut down anyway.
Either...
  1. He wanted it all for himself, or...
  2. They can't ski until the runs are all groomed, anyway...
post #17 of 24
Absolutely! Race Sc's and buying IM77's/ Dumping my 1100 chips. The two ski quiver is the ticket for me. I never thought I would enjoy a wider ski as much as I do now.
post #18 of 24

SL and.....

I'm with you Springhill. It snowed 100" in 5 days out here last week but along with the phatties I own (in increasing radius I think):

2004 Head WC I.SL 156
2003 Fischer RC4 WC SL 156
2005 Volkl 6* 175
2004 Volkl 6* 182
2003 Fischer RC4 WC GS 183


At some point (when the spring sales come) am considering moving up to the "manly" length of 165 in the SLs although it may be too much ski for me

Let's hear it for:

Tanja Poutiainen
Sarka Zahrobska
Veronika Zuzulova
Stephane Tissot
Sylvan Zurbriggen
Patrick Biggs
Andre Myhrer
Patrick Thaler

Turn em and burn em!!!

Fossil
post #19 of 24

I love my SL:11s!

This is my first season on them, and for the "exceptional" SW Michigan conditions I couldn't be happier. Fast, stable, and very "turny"!

Last weekend I strapped on a longer (188 vs. 165), older Volkl P40, those went back to the car after about 4 runs, and the Atomics came out.

For our short, icy hills (bumps), you need a shorty, turny ski. Otherwise it's two turns and done.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Originally Posted by Yuki
Actually, If we get a powder dump I'll be in a bit of trouble, but the 168's aren't too bad and the last time we had one Governor Casey of Pennsylvania asked all of the ski areas to shut down anyway.



Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Either...
  1. He wanted it all for himself, or...
  2. They can't ski until the runs are all groomed, anyway...
No, people forget how to drive in snow around here.

Oh, and Casey hasn't been Gov for quite a while. We have had snow since then!
post #21 of 24
I'm loving this thread!

I ski a '06 Rossi B3 - fantastic all mtn mid fat - but I'm considering getting a slalom or GS ski for hard pack days.

I will try to demo some of the one's you recommend. I tried the Z9 the other day but I think I could do better.
post #22 of 24
I love my volkl race tiger slalom skis.
post #23 of 24
Every time I talk to someone about skis I tell them you've got to try a pair of pure slaloms. I get this big old grin from ear to ear. Some of the most fun on skis.
post #24 of 24
True, but a cheater gs (around 17m<) can also be fun. A pure gs ski tough... not so much, especially in long length, unless you really know how to push them and have a wide open slope.
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