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Harb Carvers- Inline Skating Mirrors Correct Ski Movement Patterns

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
In an effort to make things as simple as possible for myself, partially prompted by the responses to Heluva's submitted SL & GS turn videos and the technical inputs given, would I be pretty close to duplicating correct ski technique if I practiced the movements of inline skating when making ski turns.

Better said, is there that strong of a relationship between the two? You really can't skid a inline skate turn. A ski with a wider platform under foot can easily be skidded. If I have the ski up on a high edge I would believe the turn I make would be a carved turn.

So does the conclusion become , to create the best prospects for executing pure carves on snow skis do you have to create high edge angles at the initiation of the turn? A number of critiques have made this suggestion, the manner in which you do this then becomes the issue. Or does the wider base of the ski and the relationship to your boot and the edges compared to the wheels on the bottom of a skate and your foot compromise what you are doing on inline skates transferring to correct technique on skis?

I guess what I am looking for is a body movement that I am familar with from inline skating that I can use as a reference for skiing. Or are the two intrinsically different?
post #2 of 21
Roundturns

take all this with the following reminder - i have NO idea what my body does ie how it moves where it is how fast it moves etc.... I only feel sensory... so I may be telling porkies!

I was sent to inline skate lessons to improve my fore/aft balance (non-existent).... I then discovered that my instructors buddy from USA ski school was also teaching (& qualified) inline skating.... we had a talk - he said to take the lessons & explain I was skating for skiing....

I took a few lessons (well less than skiing) over the summer...
This continued the following years... my balance did improve...
then one summer I made a BIG effort... my instructor had insisted I MUST skate 3 days a week minimum even if it was on a basketball court just going in circles... so 3 nights a week after work I headed for an old mental hospital & skated the roads.... whenever I got to the city I took a lesson or 2 and we would work on our "ski hill" a long slow hill piece of bike track.... we would skate up & "short-turn" down....

From what I can tell the only thing they left out was they did not push me to rotate body into turns as a skater really should.... (& skier should not maybe) & concentrated on parallel type turns & skating....

That winter I got back on snow & the instructor friends I had all remarked on the change in my skiing..... My instructor was so impressed he started telling his students to go learn to skate....

I can say that GOOD skate technique will help & is very similar just remember the body should not rotate into the turn...
The foot stuff I learnt all feels very similar....
Skis are fatter - but edges are sharper & more precise - asphalt hurts more....

Most of the stuff I did would be in a good skate book like "get Rolling"

umm - I have no idea about the Harb Carvers as I gather they are different from an inline skate....
post #3 of 21
What is a Harb Carver?
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Dranow
What is a Harb Carver?
like a roller skate for your ski boot to attach to.....
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Dranow
What is a Harb Carver?
http://www.harbskisystems.com/carver.htm

I've got a pair, best off season training I've found so far. Quite a bit different that inline skates (which I was using prior to getting the carvers).

The carvers don't allow lazy technique. You make clean carving movements or you fall. They are an absolute blast and people look at you like you've lost your mind as you go cruising by with ski boots on in the middle of the summer.
post #6 of 21
post #7 of 21
Thank you, didn't know about them, appreciate the links!

Edit; These look cool. Other than turning up hill how do you slow down on these. Is Road Rash a high occurrence initiation?
post #8 of 21
Cool. I have a pair of old Tecnica Icons with skate chassis mounted to them, but it seems the boots are too stiff for such a short chassis. When I get time I'll soften them up a lot.
post #9 of 21
Does the user skate with the Harb carver or do you need gravity for momentum?

Michael
post #10 of 21
Check out this comparison:
http://web.pdx.edu/~petersj/HoodCamp...rvingIndex.htm

You can find lots of interesting video of the carvers in use here:

http://web.pdx.edu/~petersj/HoodCamp/
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrettscv
Does the user skates with the Harb carver or do you need gravity for momentum?

Michael
Well, you could do a bit of skating but these are meant for using on a slope. To me it feels just like carving on skis and just like falling on solid ice.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Dranow
Thank you, didn't know about them, appreciate the links!

Edit; These look cool. Other than turning up hill how do you slow down on these. Is Road Rash a high occurrence initiation?
Depends on how much you like to twist your ski.
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl
Depends on how much you like to twist your ski.
So, onyxjl, are these a Harb secret weapon designed to kill off the competition? You know, all those PSIA losers who only know how to turn by steering?
post #14 of 21
Rick,

Don't knock it before you try it!

I homebrewed a pair with a 64 mm wheelbase, using oak for the chassis, and extra stiff bolts for the axles, not mild steel. The oak makes them very heavy.... I bought some box aluminum to build a lighter set, but it was such a lot of work, I ran out of steam. Mine have no brakes, and V2 really should have brakes, so I gave up. It's pretty expensive to build, since you need 12 wheels, and bearings for all.

Then, there is he hardness of the wheels to choose from. I used 82, since I'm huge, but regular sized folks should use 76, and lightweights 72.

They are truly amazing. But skating back uphill is a chore -- and finding the right slope in the heart of the city is near impossible.

I would first use regular in-lines on the hills you want to skate, and then switch to the carvers. They are different than inlines, since they require you to move your CM more aggressively into each turn, so start with a shallow hill.

I would recommend you try them. You can do ILE.
post #15 of 21
What about Harb carvers on a 45 deg slope with a lot of bumps?? How about harb carvers on a 45 deg slope without bumps? What about Harb carvers on a very rough surface with speed and pitch? What about harb carvers on a very soft surface with pitch??

That is the difference between them and skis and the technique involved.

RW
post #16 of 21
For sure Ron. They live on Green and Blue goomers. No crud.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
So, onyxjl, are these a Harb secret weapon designed to kill off the competition? You know, all those PSIA losers who only know how to turn by steering?
Sure is. I think he personally sent a pair to all the top brass in each PSIA division that would explode after one use. Trouble is, I don't think anyone opened the package.

Harb Carvers, from what I have heard as I haven't ordered a pair yet, are a blast to use. A lot of people that own them just use them for the enjoyment of "Harb Carving." The fact that the same technique you use on them can be easily transfered to carving on snow is a bonus too.
post #18 of 21
Not real enough for me.
...like having sex with a blow up doll ...I think.

I think you have to be very OCS to invest in a pair.
Obsessive
Compulsive
Skier

I'd rather ride my bike.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven
Not real enough for me.....
What didn't you like about them?
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White
What about Harb carvers on a 45 deg slope with a lot of bumps?? How about harb carvers on a 45 deg slope without bumps? What about Harb carvers on a very rough surface with speed and pitch? What about harb carvers on a very soft surface with pitch??

That is the difference between them and skis and the technique involved.

RW
Sure, but in summer, you can practice actual ski moves by flying to South America or New Zealand and skiing, or using Harb Carvers on local streets and parking lots.


Ken
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
For sure Ron. They live on Green and Blue goomers. No crud.
BigE, check the 55kmh treadmill.

(low to moderate motion analysis interest).
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