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Skiers Edge

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Anyone using this machine?
http://www.skiersedge.com/
Please tell me about it.
post #2 of 22
My neighbor gave me his. Its an earlier model that looks like the classic in the advertisement. I really don't know what to say about it as stupid as that sounds. It's received alot of endorsements etc.

I guess I'm not convinced the movements really mirror skiing all that well. I think riding a staionary bike can burn as many calories. If you never worked out and then got a Skiers Edge and used in regularly, I would concede your cardio vascular conditionaing would improve and you would improve endurance at higher altitudes.

As for the machine improve edging and balancing that really simulates skiing, I think that might be a stretch.
post #3 of 22
Check these threads.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...skier%27s+edge

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...skier%27s+edge

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...skier%27s+edge

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...skier%27s+edge

And as Gnarlito says in his post, "I've never used one. But I did do a search using the EpicSki search function, entering the quoted phrase "skier's edge", and found over 90 threads where it was mentioned. You may find some helpful info in one of those threads...Good luck!"
post #4 of 22
I dunno, but every time I see an ad, what comes immediately to mind is how bent over the guy is who is demoing the machine. Seems to be leaning over his poles. Also, I don't get the apparent focus on heel thrust as a way to propel the thing. Isn't that something we are meant to have left behind?

I seriously looked into buying one a couple years ago, and the above observations turned my attention elsewhere, specifically to my XC machine. The nordictrak gives me a good workout while improving my XC strength and mechanics and, as far as I can tell, without compromising any of my alpine mechanics.

One man's thinking.

JoeB
post #5 of 22
I got one last spring with everything that goes with it, and I love it.
I ski at sun valley 75-80 days a year, last year it took 1/3 of the season before I could go top to bottom (3200 vertical feet) without stopping. this year did it first day out. It helps conditioning, techniqe and balance. Be sure to get the slope simulator it really teaches balance. Ski instructors also get a good discount ask for it.
post #6 of 22
I would love to have one, but am unwilling to pay 800 or so for it.
post #7 of 22
I got one and hardly use it because I agree...seemed kinda stupid. Not a really good workout. I will say, if you ride it WITHOUT the poles...its extremely good for strengthening your core ab/back muscles for maintaining balance. I think the newer machines are a little better...they have independent feet that angle seperately..which could be good for emphasizing getting on both edges. I think if you put the time into learning how to use it..its probably useful. They say the US ski team uses it.. if that's true then the US ski team must know how to use the machine "properly", to focus on certain kinds of exercises, certain body parts and balance points.

I was going to try using it this winter, but haven't had time. I was going to try to stay on my toes more, not my heels. Push out with big toe. I believe the ability to weight the big tow is important 2/3 through the real ski turn. but really I think this machine is more about developing balance and timing then strength per say. The way its designed you can just let your body momentum carray you from side to side and you hardly need to "push" per say. But it does simulate when you reach the bottom of each side..it pushes back up at you and you need to be able to "release" your legs to fly back over to the other side.

Those guys really ought to come out with a much better video of how to use it...then maybe some good would come out of it.
post #8 of 22
I was talking to someone the other day who said her husband was out for the rest of the season because the rubber bands or something like that on his Skiers Edge broke in midsession and he tore apart his Achilles tendon in the aftermath.
post #9 of 22
I've been keeping my eye out for one on Ebay and in the paper.

I have never seen a used one for sale!
post #10 of 22

I just purchased a skier's edge, a slightly older model I found on ebay.  I LOVE it. I do not know what that guy is talking about when he mentions heal thrust.  There is NO heal thrust. It helps you learn how to shift your weight while keeping your upper body "quiet". And it definitely teaches you balance and shift your weight with your feet closer together. I would say it simulates real downhill skiing, no question about it. We just got back from Tahoe, I only used it for a few weeks and i have not been able to use all the different settings yet but it DEFINITELY helped my skiing, much more than just practicing skiing because it puts you in the correct position. You use the coaching bar at first and as you get better on that setting, you turn around so you are completely unassisted.  You are never suppposed to lean forward on the bar. It is easy to use, the settings are easy to change It isn't going to make you an expert skier overnight but I can clearly see and feel a difference. I cannot wait to start trying the mogul master! 

 

 

This is not a "RONCO" piece of equipment, it is sturdy, and effective.  My 21 year old son told me he used a very similar version of it in physical therapy when he was rehabbing his knee. He uses it as well and considers it a great workout. My husband said I was wasting my money and I politely said nothing while I stood at the bottom of the hill waiting for him as he fell over and over and over..........  And I did not tire nearly as easily as he did......

 

You get out of it what you put into it. It is a great product,

post #11 of 22

I love mine. I have the T5 All Mountain. I know some of the old ones got bad press. Never tried them so it is only what I read.

 

The newer ones seem rock solid to me. I have been using mine for 6 years. Put a good effort into the machine and  a strong start to the ski season is guaranteed. The more you put into the machine the better your ski days will be. I can't overstate the correlation. I have had years with moderate efforts and minimal results. Had years with more aggressive efforts with amazing results. 

 

SkierEdge stuff t is not cheap but neither is skiing. However, after 6 years I certainly got my money out of it. I have a tread mill which I avoid. The ski machine seems much less annoying. Considering the money that goes into skiing, the machine is really not that expensive in the long run. No equipment upgrade compares to being in much better ski shape. 

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Oliver View Post
 

I love mine. I have the T5 All Mountain. I know some of the old ones got bad press. Never tried them so it is only what I read.

 

The newer ones seem rock solid to me. I have been using mine for 6 years. Put a good effort into the machine and  a strong start to the ski season is guaranteed. The more you put into the machine the better your ski days will be. I can't overstate the correlation. I have had years with moderate efforts and minimal results. Had years with more aggressive efforts with amazing results. 

 

SkierEdge stuff t is not cheap but neither is skiing. However, after 6 years I certainly got my money out of it. I have a tread mill which I avoid. The ski machine seems much less annoying. Considering the money that goes into skiing, the machine is really not that expensive in the long run. No equipment upgrade compares to being in much better ski shape. 


Hi Jim — Welcome to Epic Ski!

 

Thanks for the info. I get a ton of marketing emails from Skier's Edge, and I'm always curious about whether it's worth the cost.  

 

On another note, check your private message inbox for a user tip!

post #13 of 22

If anyone else is interested in the Skiers Edge, I added a tag (right hand column) under Topics Discussed.  Click on it to get a list of related threads.

 

The built-in Search function in EpicSki is sometimes not that helpful.  Doing a directed Google Search such as

"skiers edge: epicski" can work out better.

post #14 of 22
I bought the T5 about 2 1/2 yrs ago. I absolutely love it.. I use it about 1/2 hr. each day. it has definitely help my on-mountain stamina, balance & technique, (especially the quiet upper body discipline)..
it is however very pricey, I got my on CL for a lot less. I then bought the coach's bar, but find that I didn't use it after the first week or so.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by GerryF View Post

I bought the T5 about 2 1/2 yrs ago. I absolutely love it.. I use it about 1/2 hr. each day. it has definitely help my on-mountain stamina, balance & technique, (especially the quiet upper body discipline)..
it is however very pricey, I got my on CL for a lot less. I then bought the coach's bar, but find that I didn't use it after the first week or so.


I have a really old model that I got for a steal from craigslist.  Unexpected since I live in North Carolina.  The owner moved from Boston.  Never thought the coach's bar would be worth much.

 

What type of platform do you have?  A friend was wondering whether the Boot Master or the Powder/Mogul Master add-ons were worth it.  I wonder whether the RPM is worth it if not likely to get the other accessories that require the RPM platform.

post #16 of 22

I have the T5, big mountain series with the all mountain platform.  I can do it with no poles for a bit, but I haven't tried it on one foot yet. 

post #17 of 22

I have not tried the Skier's Edge system but while reviewing various training routines and apparatus I ran across a study in the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2013) 12, 151-158 in which researchers out of the University of Australia monitored the EMG activation of the skiers muscles for both the Skiers Edge and another system called Skimagic.  One thing I found striking is the following quote taken from the study:

 

"Skier's Edge did not mimic the snow conditions since there was a large predominance of concentric over eccentric activation..."  Further, the authors proposed that "the simulators can not be considered as effective as other dry-land strength development exercises."  

 

Other studies have concluded an almost 2:1 ratio of eccentric to concentric muscle activity for skiers, which is the opposite of most sports and training.  For the pricing then it seems limiting for transfer of dryland training to on-slope performance improvement.  You can read more eccentric training for skiers here.

post #18 of 22
A 10yr old post resurrected. Well, the Skier's Edge is a very good tool. You can get a good quad and cardio workout, quickly. And yes there are other ways to accomplish the same thing. But the real deal with Skier's Edge is developing muscle memory for a quiet upper body......head/shoulders stationary while the lower body moves from waist down. There are drills for doing that on snow, but the SE is in a whole different class. You don't need boots, just jump on that thing and crank out 100 or 200 turns, as many sets as you like every day. Do it watching your reflection. Muscle memory develops after thousands of turns, and thousands of turns happen much quicker on the SE. I can't think of any other way of learning this so effectively. My race coaches all have them.
.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by metring View Post
 

I have not tried the Skier's Edge system but while reviewing various training routines and apparatus I ran across a study in the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2013) 12, 151-158 in which researchers out of the University of Australia monitored the EMG activation of the skiers muscles for both the Skiers Edge and another system called Skimagic.  One thing I found striking is the following quote taken from the study:

 

"Skier's Edge did not mimic the snow conditions since there was a large predominance of concentric over eccentric activation..."  Further, the authors proposed that "the simulators can not be considered as effective as other dry-land strength development exercises."  

 

Other studies have concluded an almost 2:1 ratio of eccentric to concentric muscle activity for skiers, which is the opposite of most sports and training.  For the pricing then it seems limiting for transfer of dryland training to on-slope performance improvement.  You can read more eccentric training for skiers here.


I noted that for the test, the setting for the Skier's Edge was at maximum.  I wonder how many users do that.  Sounds like the five Italian ski instructors had never use the Skier's Edge before.  Not disputing the findings, but wonder how relevant they are for recreational skiers.  The comparison tool, Skimagic, is from Italy.  The co-authors are Italian, not Australian.  Have no idea if there is a connection but does make me wonder.

post #20 of 22

I am not familiar with the settings on the Skier's Edge but it does seem that body weight and other factors should play into a proper setting.  As for a possible connection, you got me wondering as well.  But I was looking at their closing sentence and where they state " All these factors combined led to a high cost which makes the Skimagic almost impossible to be used regularly by an individual athlete..." so I am not thinking they are bias towards one or the other.  I don't believe they are saying Skiers Edge is not effective but rather rather that it was too different to be considered as specific for functional training.  Their aim in the study was to look at the 2 trainers vs. studies where they measured muscle response from skiers measured on snow.  Interesting stuff either way.

post #21 of 22

I also bit the bullet 2 months ago and got the T5 all mountain on sale new, after a few years of waffling. I love the machine.  I don't believe it will improve my technique (I am a part-time instructor) but I love the low-impact workout especially for my non-dominant leg, and hamstrings.  I was quickly able to  go for an hour comfortably on the top setting, even at 150 lbs, so I added the extra band ("ELT") which enables me to tire in 30 minutes.

 

All "cardio" machines are boring but since your head stays stable you can watch a screen.  

post #22 of 22

For a workout, I go back and forth between the stationary bike and my Skier's Edge. I have a bum knee, and Skier's Edge allows me to do as much cardio as I want without it getting sore - unlike a treadmill. Agree with SKII that all cardio machines are boring. That's why you park them in front of a TV and watch something. I just finished watching six seasons of Archer on Amazon. Talk about having your workout time fly by...

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