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Child Lift vs Adult Lift Ticket

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hello All-

If this is taboo, please excuse the question. We want to go on a family ski trip next Christmas to Keystone. We have noticed that the "adults" are for 13 years old and up. I have a 12 year old with a b-day in early
December. How 'strict' are the ages enforced for lift tickets? Could I get away with calling him 12? Thoughts? TIA!:
post #2 of 20
Depends on where you go, but my experience with the CO resorts is that they don't really check and, honestly, they really don't have any means to do so. Honesty is the best policy, but if you're buying the tickets in advance I'd say you're in the clear - no guilt trip.
post #3 of 20
I had to deal with this buying season passes because my kids have birthdays in December and January.

To me, it was well worth the extra money to demonstrate to them that you don't lie or take shortcuts just because it's cheaper to do so.

I'm not trying to come off as judgmental or anything, but that's what made ME feel more comfortable. In the end, it isn't THAT much money, is it? If it is, then ... you might have a different answer.

Plus, my oldest kid is really tall, and he can't ever get away with looking younger than he is. It's hard enough to persuade people he really IS only 11.... (I had the same problem; as a 12 year old, I had plenty of skeptical ticket-window people rolling their eyes at me, and I hated it. I'M NOT LYING, I AM 12!!!!!)
post #4 of 20
I took my son skiing the day after his 13th birthday this year. I won't deny that it occured to he to just order up a childs ticket for him, but in the end I thought it was a lesson in honesty for him to pay the adult price. He was with me at the ticket window. The young woman working there asked how old my son was when I asked for two adults. I told her he had just turned 13 the day before. She gave me two adult tickets but charged me for an adult and a child and wished him a happy birthday

Honesty is the best policy.
post #5 of 20
My son was 12 until he was 15. The only time I had a problem was at Breck 2 years ago, the ticket checker stopped him and asked him how old he was. He answered 14 and she pulled his ticket and made us go in to upgrade. It was late in the day and we didn't bother and just made our way over to the condo. I am guessing they get a "reward" for catching us bad guys.
post #6 of 20
Vail Resorts was surprisingly fair with me this year. For the first time they offered a teenager season pass for $249 (that is $100 off the adult rate for the CO pass). My son turned 18 in the beginning of January (so he is technically an adult for more than half of the season), but they said that the purchase price was for the age they are when you buy the pass, so I saved $100.
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dp
Vail Resorts was surprisingly fair with me this year. For the first time they offered a teenager season pass for $249 (that is $100 off the adult rate for the CO pass). My son turned 18 in the beginning of January (so he is technically an adult for more than half of the season), but they said that the purchase price was for the age they are when you buy the pass, so I saved $100.
Exactly - I forgot to mention the age when the ticket/pass is purchased, but I did allude to it in my previous post. When I bought my son's season pass I called Copper and asked when the age cut-off was. They only said that the age of child at the time of purchase is what is used.
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterK
I took my son skiing the day after his 13th birthday this year. I won't deny that it occured to he to just order up a childs ticket for him, but in the end I thought it was a lesson in honesty for him to pay the adult price. He was with me at the ticket window. The young woman working there asked how old my son was when I asked for two adults. I told her he had just turned 13 the day before. She gave me two adult tickets but charged me for an adult and a child and wished him a happy birthday

Honesty is the best policy.
This is the way to go, especially for anyone with kids over 5,6 y/o. A lifelong example is worth more than a few $. And I'm a tight one!
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkpaulson
Hello All-

If this is taboo, please excuse the question. We want to go on a family ski trip next Christmas to Keystone. We have noticed that the "adults" are for 13 years old and up. I have a 12 year old with a b-day in early
December. How 'strict' are the ages enforced for lift tickets? Could I get away with calling him 12? Thoughts? TIA!:
How do you know the government isn't tapping your phone and monitoring your internet postings right now?! : You'll never get away with it!
post #10 of 20

Steamboat required proof of age

When we were at Steamboat earlier this year they required proof of age for the childrens tickets. We have never had to furnish proof of age at any of the Vail Resorts ticket windows.

Gary
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
My son was 12 until he was 15. The only time I had a problem was at Breck 2 years ago, the ticket checker stopped him and asked him how old he was. He answered 14 and she pulled his ticket and made us go in to upgrade.

I am guessing they get a "reward" for catching us bad guys.
Last I knew they did. I can't remember the exact amount.
post #12 of 20
Just bring him in "drag" and take him on "Ladies Day".
post #13 of 20
At Disney they go by the age when the ticket(s) were bought.
A seven day pass purchased at age 10 and only used three days has four days left good for a lifetime until used.
When I took my then 11 year old daughter to Blizzard Beach last June I told the ticket seller "one tall person and one short person" and they told me the amount I owed and I paid it.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese

My son was 12 until he was 15.
Phil,

thank you for your honesty (in the post). Practice, Practice,Practice. How old are you? "12"

Daddy how old am I today?
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskinow

Practice, Practice,Practice. How old are you? "12"
Whenever I worked the Ski School desk and I was suspicious my second question was always,

"What grade are you in, in school ?"

Practice both, It might raise an eyebrow if the 12 year old was a Sophmore or a Junior
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkpaulson
Hello All-

If this is taboo, please excuse the question. We want to go on a family ski trip next Christmas to Keystone. We have noticed that the "adults" are for 13 years old and up. I have a 12 year old with a b-day in early
December. How 'strict' are the ages enforced for lift tickets? Could I get away with calling him 12? Thoughts? TIA!:
I'm going to be blunt, I would not hesitate to buy a children's lift ticket for a child who just had their 13th birthday a week or two previous. A couple of years previous is a different matter . Maybe you could buy the tickets online in late Nov. and then you wouldn't feel dishonest....

Don't know if they ask for ID on the mountain at Keystone.
post #17 of 20

sure it's a fine thing to cheat

And it sets a fine example for how your children should live their lives.

Cheat at the ski area and at the skate park.

Change the price tags too if you feel something is priced too high.

Roll back the odometer on your car too before you sell it.

And you are the first guy line hollering when Y-O-U get ripped.


gotta wonder ... where it starts ... now I know ..

Bitch about the bail for your kid who "got framed" and "set up".
post #18 of 20
We've always bought the appropriate lift tickets as the kids aged up. If you teach your kids to lie, what recourse do you have when they start lying to you?

In the long run, honesty pays more dividends than saving a few $$$ for a lift ticket, IMO.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudpeak
We've always bought the appropriate lift tickets as the kids aged up. If you teach your kids to lie, what recourse do you have when they start lying to you?

In the long run, honesty pays more dividends than saving a few $$$ for a lift ticket, IMO.
I do agree with this point, that's why I'd try to buy the ticket on line before the kid's birthday. You are talking a week or two into 13, not two years.
post #20 of 20
I'll be blunt too!
You spend upwards of $2000 on a ski trip and then tell your kids that it is noble to lie to save a couple bucks.
You gotta wonder!
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