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Suggest a good instructional book or CD.

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Background: I'm a 58 yr. old upper level intermediate skier who started skiing as an adult. I live 1,000 miles from the mountains so I've got lots more time for reading than I do for lessons. I read the ski mags and follow these web sites. Last year I read both of Harb's books but frankly did not understand some of the stuff he was writing about and could not put myself in some of the positions he was suggesting.

We also took lessons at John Clendenin's 2.5 day camp which was very helpful. John's "Little Toe" oriented teaching was good and seemed very intuitive. He was the first instructor I've had who really talked about how to use the edges for something other than carving or side slipping. I think it was similar to Harb but I never quite got the message reading Harb's books and CD.

Ski instruction books are not available in Memphis book stores so I can't browse or preview anything. Obviously some of you have strong ideas about the alphabet soup (PMTS, PSIA, DP) styles of instruction. I do not know enough about any of it to have an opinion but if someone would like to recommend some reading for a "mature" reader with an open mind I would appreciate it.

PS: I wish I knew what Harb did to make some of you so mad. Some of these posts sound more like a Soap Opera.
post #2 of 20
Harald's books are interesting, Lito Tejada-Flores' book Breakthrough on the New Skis is good, as are the R. Mark Elling (All Mountain Skier) and the Deslauriers' (Ski the Whole Mountain) books. I'd suggest Elling's and the Deslauriers' as a good start.
post #3 of 20
I find Lito's writing easy to understand, and IMHO, he is a talented writer.
You might find Lito's writings in www.breakthroughonskis.com to be useful. I've learned a lot from the website
post #4 of 20
I think Lito hands down is the best at explaining things in an easy to read style. He is a great communicator and writer. Not everybody agrees with his instruction but I don't think anybody can fault his writing ability. I believe his conviction that dynamic anticipation is a necessary movement pattern that contributes to being able to ski well in more difficult terrain is good stuff.

I just got the Ellering book, All Mountain Skier and enjoyed it. Might be a bit dated with the steering discussions but I thought it was good read with a lot of very good boot fitting info.

I'm waiting for Harb's newest book that won't come out till summer I guess. Anybody know what Up Side Down Is? He promises to unveil this in his new book.
post #5 of 20

All mountain skier

Mark Elling's book is really great if you are past wedging always and can already produce some form of "open parallel". It will work very well.

Each chapter is laid out very well -- Theory section for thinkers, drills to do for doers, how it looks for watchers, and how it should feel for feelers.

Lito's is better for motivation. His writing style is very good, but I like the content of the Ellings book better.

Delauriers stuff is of the lift and lighten school... One move does it all.

No comment on Harb.

Ron Lemaster is an excellent reference book. While it does not tell you how to ski, it analyzes good skiers and their moves, and gives you lots of "burst mode" photo montages to look at...

I'd suggest Elling and LeMaster would be an excellent combination.
post #6 of 20
umm

if it that far from snow then how about inline skate lessons...

will surely help your skiing
post #7 of 20

Al Hobart's CDs

What about Al Hobart's "Complete Carving Made Easy"?
post #8 of 20
Skiing and the Art of Carving, Ellen Post Foster. The book and video are available from the Turning Point Foundation. Easy to follow format with exercises, lesson plans and progressions.

The Skiers Edge , Ron LeMasters. Pretty technical, not a how to book.

How the Racers Ski and the Athletic Skier, Warren Witherell. Some of the material is dated but still relevant.

Inner Skiing, Timothy Gallwey. Skiing for your head.

Alpine Technical Video, PSIA. Available from the PSIA web site. Geared more toward instructors, has demos, exercises and progressions you might find helpfull.

PSIA-Rocky Mountain Skiing Standards, PSIA-RM. Demos of skiing standards for instructors. Great skiing, not an instructional video. The introduction is worth the price of the video.
post #9 of 20
I found Lito's book easy to read and helpful -- I also found his videos helpful as well.
post #10 of 20
I have the Hobart DVD . I'm surprised its rarely discussed here on the instruction forum. When you watch him demonstrate the "gorilla turn" I thought there was no way WC skiers were using this technique. Watching the Kostelics there's no doubt that is exactly what is taking place.

Plus he breaks it down so it looks very doable for mere mortals.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
*** is good, as are the R. Mark Elling (All Mountain Skier) and the Deslauriers' (Ski the Whole Mountain) books. I'd suggest Elling's and the Deslauriers' as a good start.
I agree. Elling's and desLauriers Bros' books are the best, with Witherell's books good for the technically minded.
post #12 of 20
If you can find it,

Georges Joubert, "Skiing, an art a technique"

This guy was way ahead of his time. Some consider this very dated and has been out of print for many years but if you read through it you will realize just how far ahead of the curve this book was and is.

I still refer to this book for ideas and as a reference. I suspect a lot of the more open minded instructors that have access to it do the same.

DC
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
Anybody know what Up Side Down Is? He promises to unveil this in his new book.
Yes. In PSIA-speak, it's early edge engagement. If you want to discuss it, you could start a new thread...
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice. I'll order Lito's book.

The in line skates suggestion is probably a good one but I'm not willing to get that up close and personal with asphalt.
post #15 of 20
Take a lesson ... if I can stay intact YOU can do it too.... (instructors are great to grab.. especially young male ones )

try IISA they have lessons & instructors etc
post #16 of 20
Wow, I'm a bit stunned that our own Weems; Author, "Brilliant Skiing, Every Day" http://www.edgechange.com
hasen't been been offered. Truely one of the best.
post #17 of 20
I have some of Lito's older books and videos. They are 100% outside ski oriented. Are the newer versions similarly based on the notion of lightening the inside ski and riding the outside ski?
post #18 of 20
oops
post #19 of 20
Lemaster's the Skier's Edge is a must have for all skiers in IMHO.
post #20 of 20
I have read all of the books mentioned so far in this thread.

I'd like to add Warren Witherell's "The Athletic Skier" for those of you who are technically inclined. The equipment alignment sections are what I found most interesting. The skiing parts are dated since they pre-date the modern shaped ski, but it's still an interesting read nonetheless.
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