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Ski School Complaint (Child's class) - Page 2

post #31 of 45
As for leashes, most childrens' instructor can tell right away which child has "skied" either leaning against dad's legs, or been attached to a leash. When I see a parent using one, it's generally on terrain for which the child is not ready.

If you are going to teach your child yourself, try not to overterrain them (and believe me, instructors are just as guilty of this as parents - but, there is a time and place for pushing a child as to regarding terrain).

Make the learning of skiing a game for the child; the more "play" involved, the more likely the child will retain a enjoyment of skiing later.

Just my 2 cents.
post #32 of 45

What's the right chair in SLC?

I don't know the best beginner chairs in SLC area so I am posing this question for js137.

Any local volunteers who will mentally set aside the beauties of the steeps and powder of their favorite area and name best beginner chair names?

Log in under a friend's ID if you have to admit it is at a neighboring area...

What chair at what area would this small child [whose skills are basic] enjoy? (Terrain only, follow up with the recommendation of a program/instructor).
post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White
Ouch! Lonnie,
Did you at least give "mom" the look?

RW
No, it was a driving snow storm. She never saw me. I just shook my head.

It's amazing all the crazy stuff I've seen parents do with their kids. Skiing with kids between their legs, yelling at them, skiing them in inapproprate terrain, etc, etc.

L
post #34 of 45
So true, Lonnnie. Add to your list, almost killing them getting on and off chair lifts (they end up using one arm as a handle, it's a wonder they don't pull the arm right off), crashing right on top of them, taking them down runs that terrify them and then yelling abuse at them, sending them out on bad weather days in clothing that is neither warm enough or in any way water resistant, sending them out without any breakfast ("we didn't have time"...), boots on the wrong feet... the list goes on. If an instructor did any of that stuff, they'd be in the pillory quick smart.

and then, they bring them to ski school to fix all these problems which have mysteriously appeared! In a couple of hours, all those things are to be cured.
post #35 of 45
do you suppose "those" parents are here reading any of this? I, too, have seen the hideous displays ... parents yelling at children to stop being a baby because they are unhappy or afraid is the worst of all, I think.

it's also scary to watch a parent who is not a very strong skier with a kid between their legs .... YIKES

Jason -- if you want your daughter to learn a good strong wedge (which is what her little body should be doing) then learn to ski backwards (in a wedge) and bend over and hold her ski tips with your hands ... direct her to stop, turn left and right. provided you chose VERY gentle terrain, she should be able to steer and stop both of you -- especially if she's strong like you say. you can have her place her hands on your head while you're holding her ski tips apart and in a wedge.

good luck,
kiersten
post #36 of 45
Thread Starter 
Wow! Thanks for the all the feedback.

So, we won't be going on a chair until she is ready. She is not afraid and will actually be disappointed to not get to it, but I don't want to slow down her progress with the devices. Skiing backward holding the tips would be the only option.

I would never scream at my child while skiing. I grew up racing motocross and it always amazed me how many parents would scream and yell and 5 year olds who could barely ride over the terrain. It was digusting and it is still disgusting to me now. Actually, the opposite: if she didn't want to ski this year or a particular day, then she doesn't have to.

Right now she can make a wedge with some turning and come to a stop on very gentle terrian without any aid at all.

I spoke with my wife last night about some of the comments posted here and she agreed that it probably wasn't strength, but impatience at waiting around that caused her to just point 'em straight. Unfortunately (or fortunately depending on how you view it!), she has no fear. So rather than dealing with getting over her fear we get to try to impress upon why some things should be intimidating!

Thanks again for all the comments - I really appreciate it!

Jason
post #37 of 45
Jason,

Another thing that just occured to me. If you still have her equipment (assuming you didn't rent it), let her play around the house and in the yard with her boots/skis on (just make sure she won't hurt herself or the hardwood floors!). Even if it's just walking around, it will help her. You can have her make "pizza" shapes with the skis on the carpet or in the grass it will really help.

L
post #38 of 45
Jason,

Quote:
I spoke with my wife last night about some of the comments posted here and she agreed that it probably wasn't strength, but impatience at waiting around that caused her to just point 'em straight.
No need to wait around, try placing some objects, (gloves, cones, plastic discs) in a line down a small spotion of the hill and have her ski around them. Then, push her back to the top of the "course". Change the line of the cones to change the shape of the turns. This is best done for you without skis on so you are more mobile. In a half of an hour, she will be skiing a lot, both down the hill and back up as you push her from her hip area.
I do this when the magic carpet has a long line. Start toward the bottom of the area, and then you can always move a little higher as her turns get shaped better. It also helps to walk the course slightly in front of her so she knows the way.

RW
post #39 of 45
Thread Starter 
Lonnie-
Actually, I am just renting this year so I can't take advantage of that option.

Ron-
Thanks, I will definitely try that. If she thinks it is a game or some fun challenge she will probably do it without even thinking about it!

J
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
So true, Lonnnie. Add to your list, almost killing them getting on and off chair lifts (they end up using one arm as a handle, it's a wonder they don't pull the arm right off), crashing right on top of them, taking them down runs that terrify them and then yelling abuse at them, sending them out on bad weather days in clothing that is neither warm enough or in any way water resistant, sending them out without any breakfast ("we didn't have time"...), boots on the wrong feet... the list goes on. If an instructor did any of that stuff, they'd be in the pillory quick smart.

and then, they bring them to ski school to fix all these problems which have mysteriously appeared! In a couple of hours, all those things are to be cured.
yeah the one I loved when i worked in the little kid "dressing& feeding" bit of the ski school was the parent in "insert trendy expensive brand name here" fancy ski suit... and the tiny kid in the cheapest suit that was wet through & cotton frilly socks! FFS buy your kid some clothes! then the kid would not even have a spare hat or gloves (also cheap) and they would send them to ski school in a howling blizzard while they sat at Kareela drinking Gluhwein!!! I swear one poor kid was blue in the lips... I spent ages just cuddling her while she cried that mom was not returning!
post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by S11
Any local volunteers who will mentally set aside the beauties of the steeps and powder of their favorite area and name best beginner chair names?
I've never taught there but I think Alta has the neatest begginner terrain..long low angle but with interesting terrain little places to play and so on. But the big advantage is skiers only. Not a slam on Boarders I just think it is doubly difficult to mix beginner boarders and skiers. Brighton used to be the place to go for beginners but becuse of this issue I wouldn't be sure anymore. I have to put in one (biased) in for High Meadow at Canyons too -- last year it wasn't great because there was a skier return right through the beginners area, but this year they have put in a new trail to divert all of the traffic away from that area. ANd it is nice and wide open. Plus Saddleback is right next to it when people progree (though the runs off Saddleback are a little too challenging for someone just moving off of High Meadow. There are neat wooded areas around too with little areas of single-track and whopdiedos that children love..
post #42 of 45
I had to chime in on the comments about parents having kids on inappropriate terrain. (Not the Original Poster, of course, but it came up in this thread).

Just today I got a call from my manager at one of my non-ski-related jobs, asking me if I could teach his 9-year-old a private. I started asking about how long the child had been skiing, what he wanted me to work on, etc. To my amazement I heard "Oh we've been skiing mostly blue runs. He can get down about the first half but then I have to carry him. He has trouble holding a snowplow."

Yipes! The kid can't stay in a gliding wedge, but his dad has him out on blues. Obviously the poor kid is in a straightline power-wedge until he wears out and collapses. What are these parents thinking? That is not the terrain where a child should be learning basic skiing manouvers - even if it is where mom and dad want to ski. :

Of course since he's my boss, I couldn't say that to him. :

Fortunately he decided to ski this weekend at a mountain other than where I work, so no risk of a request private. Despite that added pay, that would be a big challenge to change, especially given the parental expectations of "where did Johnny ski today?"

Unfortunately I had to promise to ask around for some names. Anybody at Keystone want to jump on this challenge?
post #43 of 45
I would guess that they would have appropriate terrain at Alta for your daughter to be able to ride the lift. If not, and she really wants to ride one, do a round trip. I've done that with my daughter. Or take her to Snowbird and ride the tram up and back with her.

I know a lot of people here don't like harnesses, but I use one for my daughter. If used *properly*, they can be a great asset. The idea is only to use it as a safety device. You don't want to let her "hang" on it all the way down the hill. And if you get one, get the kind that straps around the upper legs and waist. NOT the chest harness... unless you want to slam your daughter onto her back: . My daughter never used the tip locks (edgie-wedgies). We tried for half a run, but they did more harm than good because she was able to hold a solid wedge already. When I ski with my daughter with the harness, I either ski beside her with a lot of slack in the lines or just let go and let it drag. This way, if she gets tired and and starts to accelerate too much, I can reel her in. But even when I do this, it's only to get her back to a slow speed. Then I take the pressure off the lines. Once in a while I've had to just stop her because she wigged out and wouldn't resond to any requests to make a wedge or turn. When I do that, I stop her fairly quickly, then just sit with her for a while and talk to her and calm her down until she's ready to go on her own again.

The harness is also great for towing her around the flats. Do NOT (let me repeat that) DO NOT use your poles and tow her around with them! Also do NOT try to ski with both of you holding a ski pole, thinking that it will help her. She'll just fall on her back, or worse yet, you'll cross tails with her and tear up her kness. Not a good way to end a vacation. If you are going to be skiing with your daughter, leave your poles inside or park them in the snow somewhere safe. Don't try to handle your daughter and your poles at the same time.

Definitely use a carpeted area in your house to put her skis on and have her practice stuff.
post #44 of 45
creating a turning course is a *great* idea .. I used to round up ski poles and do it. she's ready for a course like this when she can stop and turn anywhere and anytime she wants to.

surface lifts are also a great idea ... you can balance her against your legs on any rope tow or j-bar. if you're not sure how to do this ... watch instructors or ask for tips.

also -- another thing to consider is that most rental shops have "seasonal rental" programs for around $100. this is a GREAT way to have your own equipment without going broke constantly replacing it as she grows.
post #45 of 45

alta ski school

JS137-

Don't be astounded if your daughter winds up getting to ride one of the chairlifts at alta. They do a great job of getting young kids to the point where they can ride the lift, and there are some great "bear trails" (through the woods paths where most adults have to duck) where the kids can gain experience and feel like they are exploring, as well.

Robyn is great at running the kids program.

Both my kids went through it and learned quickly and had fun. Now they are both in college and kick my butt on teles.
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