or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bump video for analysis

post #1 of 63
Thread Starter 
Hope this link works: http://media.putfile.com/mogul-skiing.

This is my first time seeing myself in the bumps, so I've learned a lot by watching it. Will reserve my own comments to give others the chance to assess my skiing first.

My objective in the bumps: ski as aggressively as possible while minimizing wear and tear on my body.

Please forgive the "jump" in the middle. It was my first time on a competition course, and I wanted to assess the jump first. I think I may even be waving my arms a little bit, expecting big air.:

Also, note the appropriate music coming from the mountain's speakers in the background.

Thanks for any input.

--Adam
post #2 of 63
Great skiing my friend. LOL, yes, you were a bit nervouse comming off that jump but you picked up the rhythm very nicely after touch down. That is the hardest part in mogul skiing I think.

You have a good rhythm down the mogul field and you cope well with incresing speed and the wett sluchy snow. For your level I have very little to rant but if you would want to improve your level you should be working a bit harder with your feet. You are a bit stiff looking and you are in the back seat. Yes, now watching it again a couple of times makes me even more certain that you should be flexing much more with your leggs. You should also loosen up your knees and work harder with them as well.

Thanks for posting the video. I also like the woman shouting yeah in the beginning. Must be like that with all our home made skiing videos.... girlfriends and wifes or sisters having to ski down first and then film the to become film stars. Great filming by the way. Very rare to get this steady shooting.
post #3 of 63
Nice vid.
Curious as to where you're skiing.
post #4 of 63
Looks like Whiteface? I recognize the building at the bottom as possibly the GS/SL finish area? I might be wrong though.
post #5 of 63
Thread Starter 
It's Hunter Mtn, my home mountain (unfortunately) for the moment. Video is from last spring. Have already shortened my poles since then, since, as tdk6 noted, I find myself in the backseat from time to time, and I figured shorter poles will help me keep my hands in front of me.

Loosening my knees and flexing my legs sounds good. I think that will make for smoother skiing (I notice I seem a little herky-jerky after first "jump"...probably my way of slowing down). Will that also help get me out of the back seat? Am currently working on bringing my feet back under me after each bump, also.

Unfortunately, I've never had a lesson, so there's a lot of trial and error going on. But don't worry, Ron, just because I'm seeking free advice here, doesn't mean I'm not going to be hitting you up for a lesson soon (mostly carving help needed though).
post #6 of 63
Shortening my poles helped a ton skiing in the bumps. Once you got past the jumps it looked much better. You looked a little tentative above them.
post #7 of 63
I saw that first frame of the video and noticed it was a competition mogul course so I was assuming I was going to see you zipper line the field. I was definitely surprised to see you just kind of cruise them then.

Your line was interesting in that you didn't seem to be running right down in the troughs the whole time (there was a lot of up/down movement). Maybe it was just that I'm used to seeing people run them from a different angle or that you weren't fully absorbing them on the front side and extending on the back side. Oh hell I don't know - I don't even know why I'm attempting to do an MA. I will say that you never looked out of control, but you did seem to be a bit in the back seat on the second section.
post #8 of 63
I think you did a good job...but honestly I cannot tell how well you would ski bumps...becuase well....there were no bumps on your video...those are like piles of snow...if you want real bumps you have to ski something steeper in the east...I am not trying to sound rude or like a dic...I am just saying that the "moguls" in your video do not force you to ski them like you have to ski big moguls with steep back sides and deep troughs...therefore you have to much freedom to ski any where you want...I want to see some bone jaring moguls!!
post #9 of 63
Why can't I view these Putfile videos? Am I missing something? Is the video supposed to start on it's own? I see a play button, but it's not lit up, and I don't see anything else to get it to load/play.

Help!
post #10 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gretch6364
there were no bumps on your video
I did ski huge moguls at Mad River Glen last year. Actually, not so hard. Maybe because of my style -- not zipperline -- I don't find huge moguls intimidating. Wierdly placed moguls (often with 90 degree faces) on steep icy runs, regardless of size of moguls, are much more challenging for me.
post #11 of 63
JohnH, the files should start on their own, unless for some reason you have that type of media blocked from your web browser. Sometimes they don't start on their own and you need to hit play... or your connection might just be really slow, and you aren't giving the file enough time to load. Without being there at your computer it is a hard problem to solve (although I cannot upload to putfile without my firewall being turned off - so that may be a problem as well).
Later
GREG
post #12 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
This is my first time seeing myself in the bumps, so I've learned a lot by watching it. Will reserve my own comments to give others the chance to assess my skiing first.

My objective in the bumps: ski as aggressively as possible while minimizing wear and tear on my body.

Please forgive the "jump" in the middle. It was my first time on a competition course, and I wanted to assess the jump first. I think I may even be waving my arms a little bit, expecting big air.:--Adam
Well Adam your second sentence is an oxymoron in bumps. Which do you want, agressive mogul skiing or low wear and tear on your body? Choose wisely.

Competative mogul runs are different than natural bumps and much tougher to do with style and speed. You make the run look fairly easy and that is not easy to do. I do not think you are seriously in the back seat when the idea of competitive bumps are taken into account. You are skiing them in a very traditional fashion and doing an admirable job. You appear to have contorl of the throttle. That would easily pass a PSIA level III bump test.

I use to be able to do that stuff with big air but it does take its toll on the body. I am not as flexible and have joint problems associated with skiing zipperline moguls for too many years. That said, other bears will verify that I am still totally addicted to moguls to this day but cannot take a beating while skiing them.

I could pick it apart but I suspect you don't get many days on snow per year and days on snow per year is what you need to smooth things out. If I have any advice for you its go to the corduroy and really work on a short round turn. You will be surprised with the results. That will do a lot to take the place of time on snow.

When you are ready I will come and ski with you. I still basically ski in the zipperline corridor but I have learned a different method now at 50 years old that is torture free. You ski bumps well enough that I will totally enjoy pounding your tail into the snow at speed on telemark gear if you ski them as aggressively as you are skiing bumps in the video. Incidently I get tired if the bumps are slow so I prefer bumps to be rock hard and vary constantly.

I propose that someone find some decent bumps (read huge icy Volkswagons) near the end of February and the bears have a first ever bump fest. I will share my secrets in order to get you to ski the bumps longer. I have not sense of when to knock off skiing them.
post #13 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
you did seem to be a bit in the back seat on the second section.
I'm looking forward to getting a lesson this year to find out more about this back seat which people speak of. I have this fear that I've always been in the back seat and have kind of figured out unconsciously various tricks to ski effectively nonetheless.
post #14 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
JohnH, the files should start on their own, unless for some reason you have that type of media blocked from your web browser. Sometimes they don't start on their own and you need to hit play... or your connection might just be really slow, and you aren't giving the file enough time to load. Without being there at your computer it is a hard problem to solve (although I cannot upload to putfile without my firewall being turned off - so that may be a problem as well).
Later
GREG
Corporate firewalls suck! Maybe I'll get time at home some day to see all these videos people are putting up. Not likely, though. I'm a lot busier at home than at work.
post #15 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre
Well Adam your second sentence is an oxymoron in bumps. Which do you want, agressive mogul skiing or low wear and tear on your body? Choose wisely.
You've got to post some video of your mogul skiing up here. I definitely want to go the low wear and tear route and want to see how it's done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre
That would easily pass a PSIA level III bump test.
Thanks for the compliment. Of course, I had to weed through hundreds of hours of video clips to get a decent run to show you. Actually, that's not true, but there is something about your wife watching you with a video camera in her hand that raises your game a little.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre
I suspect you don't get many days on snow per year and days on snow per year is what you need to smooth things out.
In the past, no (prior to last year, something like 2-3 days per year for the last 15 years), but trying to get out more. Will work on the short round turns.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre
I propose that someone find some decent bumps (read huge icy Volkswagons) near the end of February and the bears have a first ever bump fest. I will share my secrets in order to get you to ski the bumps longer. I have not sense of when to knock off skiing them.
I'm in!!!
post #16 of 63
don't think they would pass LIII here in the West. weight is back. otherwise very good skiing.

Also I think the bumps would be a lot tougher for a LIII here. Can't really see the pitch of the slope The bumps I had to ski for LII were about what you see in my "video for picking apart" thread. My LIII bumps were not as soft and much tighter and poorly shaped.

And no I didn't pass the LIII bumps on my last attempt. Main comment from the Examiners? Weight back! I think the run we had to do was a lot longer as well. Probably about 2.5 times longer. We were expected to ski the whole run with few breaks in flow and no stops..

DC
post #17 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
don't think they would pass LIII here in the West. weight is back. otherwise very good skiing.
I'll work on them some more and post video at the end of the season. Last year was my first year skiing moguls on skis shorter than 203, so I'm just giddy as a schoolgirl to find them much more manageable now on 172s than they used to be. Now I need to go from being complacent to taking it to the next level.
post #18 of 63
No doubt about it, that's good skiing. If you were at ESA East, and had a chance to see Mike Rogan ski bumps, You will see why they seem to think everyone should be able to ski nasty bumps well.

DC
post #19 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
If you were at ESA East.
DC
I wish I could have gone. You need something later in the season, though (on the East Coast). I'm just barely getting in shape now. A month ago, I would have been exhausted after one run.
post #20 of 63
Given the few days you spend on the hill you ski moguls surprisingly well.

Here are a couple of things:

1) As has already been stated you are in the back seat. Watch the clip and notice the relationship of your hips to your feet. See how far back they are? Agressively pull your feet back under your hips.

2) Another area mentioned briefly is absorption. Think of your legs a big piston or as shock absorbers. As you enter the trough you extend the legs and as you hit a bump you flex the legs. You do this over and over so that the skis never leave the snow. Watch the clip and note how often your tips leave the snow. Getting your feet under your hips and using the piston motion will help with this.

3) Watch your arms in the first few turns after the jump. Notice the movement as you pole plant...see the right arm getting pulled to the side and even a bit behind. Play around and see if you can do your plants using a flick of wrist. As you said, shorter poles will probably help here.
post #21 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
don't think they would pass LIII here in the West. weight is back. otherwise very good skiing.

Also I think the bumps would be a lot tougher for a LIII here. Can't really see the pitch of the slope The bumps I had to ski for LII were about what you see in my "video for picking apart" thread. My LIII bumps were not as soft and much tighter and poorly shaped.

And no I didn't pass the LIII bumps on my last attempt. Main comment from the Examiners? Weight back! I think the run we had to do was a lot longer as well. Probably about 2.5 times longer. We were expected to ski the whole run with few breaks in flow and no stops..

DC
Dchan I can ski monster bumps all day long out west but the minute you put me in a comp course I have a hard time sucking them up. One thing about a bump video. The bumps always look much smaller than they are and the skier always looks further back than they actually are, especially in a comp run. When you reach to take a hit on every bump the hips are behind the feet but center briefly when the hit is absorbed. Were he back very far, his hands would be far more undisciplined, he would not have the speed control and he would have landed in the back seat when he came off the jump.

Its videos just like this that give other skiers the assumption that you need to sit back in bumps. He is in the back seat a little because he is skiing in a defensive, fast line slow mode but that is traditional zipperline bump skiing.
post #22 of 63
I counted 33 turns top to bottom which is short for a bump run, especially a competition bump run. I would say that Voodoo, the comp bump run at Steamboat is 3 times that long with two jumps. As dchan said, bigger bumps and longer course.

You ski bumps much like I do now at 55. If that tells you anything. I could rip the line you are skiing, 33 turns without any problem. Most of the big bump runs out west find me taking a few breathers somewhere between the top and the bottom. My mind says yes but my knees and thighs say no.

This will help you. Try this next time you will improve. You are letting your skis get too much sideways, no doubt trying to control your speed. This could be because of a lack of confidence. Speed should be your friend. More speed and quicker edgesets and release with your tips pointed more toward the falline. Your upper body is still but your hips are almost rotating where your turns should be from the knees to your skis. In other words, basically just your ankles and feet. Now combine one more thing. With your tips more in the falline, you can push your tips forward down the front side of the bumps and make sure your hands and poles go with them. This will get you out of the back seat. Quick hands make quick feet. Make sure your hands and poles never get close to even with your body relative to the falline.

These three easy tips will help you become better and they're easy to practice. You're young and have time to improve. Your style of bump skiing is good and will get you down anything. This style will work in icey Eastern bumps but as soon as you add some loose snow or powder in those bumps, getting your skis that far across the falline will cause you to catch a tip or tail or ski over your pole tip and that ole snow snake will bite you.

Keep on bumpin
post #23 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
In the past, no (prior to last year, something like 2-3 days per year for the last 15 years), but trying to get out more. Will work on the short round turns.
I'm in!!!
I mean you could smooth things out with 100 days a year on snow with a traditional style.
post #24 of 63
Your last sentence says it all Pierre.
post #25 of 63
One thing I should add, when your knees compress up towards your chest you must push your tips back down to "stand tall" again. If you are squating while skiing bumps, you can do nohing but be in the back seat.
post #26 of 63
Thread Starter 
Lots of good stuff, Lars and Max501. I'm printing this thread out, so I can review it at the top of the hill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
You are letting your skis get too much sideways, no doubt trying to control your speed. This could be because of a lack of confidence.
Exactly! I don't feel comfortable at high speed in the bumps. Will work on making speed my friend...or at least my acquaintance.
post #27 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
I counted 33 turns top to bottom which is short for a bump run, especially a competition bump run. I would say that Voodoo, the comp bump run at Steamboat is 3 times that long with two jumps. As dchan said, bigger bumps and longer course.

You ski bumps much like I do now at 55. If that tells you anything. I could rip the line you are skiing, 33 turns without any problem. Most of the big bump runs out west find me taking a few breathers somewhere between the top and the bottom. My mind says yes but my knees and thighs say no.
Well I blew up the video and paused it many times. I am not changing my mind all that much. I think he could rip a line three times longer without a break. I think its damn good for not getting to ski bumps very often. I can tell you I could not ski 33 turns using that style without some back problems Lars. You must be in better shape.

Are you in for a bump get together in the East?
post #28 of 63
Does a Bear $hit in the woods?
post #29 of 63
I'm not tearing him apart. I think he did a nice job. He's just skiing too hard in this video. He could be working alot less if he'd just let em run a little more.

This style is no good for powder bumps though Pierre. Like I said, he'd be getting his skis yanked right off his feet . It'd be like trying to stop in deep powder.
post #30 of 63
Lars I bring em way out of the fall line. As much as he does or more but its the slow line fast method.

Quote:
Does a Bear $hit in the woods?
Where would be a good place to gather for a mogul rendezvous? Ahh let's see, where is he from. Oh Woodstock! I remember Woodstock, don't you Lars?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching