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Great All-Mountain Clinic - Page 9

post #241 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncle crud
dude, you are the one extrapolating "arrogant SOB"

go back and read the statements you made regarding PSIA "terminal intermediates"

and think about this: were the "terminal intermediates" terminal because of bad lessons, or because of PSIA?
Please post the exact quote in context so I know what you are referring to and then I'll eat crow if need be.
post #242 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
Please post the exact quote in context so I know what you are referring to and then I'll eat crow if need be.
http://forums.epicski.com/showpost.p...2&postcount=59

the last response
post #243 of 328
Let's put it in context and figure out exactly how it leads to your statement,

Quote:
Originally Posted by uncle crud
I think you should go back and read your first few posts, before people showed you the error of your arrogance.
HeluvaSkier make this statement,
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
It does a huge dis-service to the system having "hacks" describing the system as better, when they probably wouldn't know a better system if it slapped them in the face as hard as a swinging Metron B:5 shovel. They know what PMTS tells them, and not much else. Harb and Dianna say that "TTS" is bad, so TTS (a name coined by Harb) is bad.
And then I quoted him (for context) and said,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
If a terminal intermediate has spent time and money taking TTS lessons over the years do they not know what TTS is? If they then take a PMTS lesson or camp and then make solid progress are they not qualified to compare the two and opine that one is better than the other?
So, Uncle Crud, help me out here and explain where the arrogance is? Also, how did I bash PSIA here?
post #244 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Si, let me say that I believe that you believe what you're saying here. Really. However, my training and analysis disagrees with your observation. I have the Phantom Move in Bumps and Rocca clips playing next to each other on my second screen as I type this. In both clips I see the femurs rotating beyond the position of the upper body in both directions, implying that they are actively turned beyond the counter force created by the body separation.

In the case of the bumps, there is substantially more snow spray at the bottom of the turn, implying that the tails break loose and push the snow. In Rocca's case, he turns the skis 90 degrees in the air by rotating his legs (as his knees are pointed directly at the camera. You can see the femurs rotate very clearly). Whether he rotates like that to tip the skis or to pivot them is immaterial. The result is that he both tips and pivots them simultaneously. To claim that he only intended to tip them is clearly inaccurate, since tipping them only would have kept him moving across the hill instead of down the hill around the next gate.

In short, I believe that I see the movements that are described as "rotary for the purpose of tipping." I just do not agree that they are only tipping. Instead, I see them as rotary movements that aid the redirection of the skis and the shaping of the turn.
Steve, I really think we're off track talking about someone making a turn in the air. I guess I'll restate what I'm trying to get across one more time and give it a rest. This is my viewpoint only and not a representation of PMTS (although it is certainly influenced by what I know of both PMTS and ATS).

People here talk about the three things you can do to a ski: pressure, edging, and rotary. (While I think pressure and rotary are both ineffective terms and can be counterproductive I'll leave that for another time). From here I take a definition of rotary in terms of the force and/or torques one applies to the ski through the boot/binding interface. I try to differnetiate any other discussion of "rotary" as one dealing with body positions and movements (although many posts don't allow for this as they employ a vague concept of "rotary").

In theory it would be very simple to measure "rotary" torque applied to a ski by placing pressure sensors on the inside and outside of both the forefoot and the heel of the foot. (Alternatively we coul place the pressure sensors on each side of the binding toe and heel piece). If, for example, we measure an increased pressure on the outside of the forefoot and inside of the heel we know there is a net rotary torque being applied to the ski. Of course given this point of view perhaps it might be better to talk about "significant" rotary torque applied to a ski as it would probably be the rare case where there wasn't some slight differential in pressure gradient (as measured from some established neutral) on opposite sides between fore and aft of the foot.

If you want to talk about hip rotation (as you've done here) then I would suggest you need to invovle a complete description/analysis of the kinetic chain that gives the net effect in terms of action ON THE SKI. As I've said, you can have lot's of hip rotation without imparting any net rotary torque on the ski - just lift and tip your foot without rotating it to see a demonstration. I just don't see or understand the importance so many people seem to place on active and passive hip rotation or movevment around any particular joint. What's important from my point of view is what the net effect on the ski is. Typically, what I do at any joint is pretty much automatically accomplished based on my overall goal, i.e., tip the ski, rotate the ski, retract the ski, etc. Certainly in working on my skiing I may occasionally focus on specific movement about a single joint to try and improve or correct the kinetic chain, but in general it is not a point of focus as it rarely a single joint issue that needs to be addressed. I think one of the best things about PMTS is that it focuses on the most basic movement patterns (with appropriate cues for proper initiation and sequencing) without trying breaking things down in a conterproductive fashion.

Ok so now onto the sequence of Harald in bumps as an example. This is clearly not a very good example to talk about as we don't see a continuous sequence but only a few slices in time. I think this can be VERY misleading but nevertheless, let's discuss it. I do agree with you that at first glance the clip looks to me like there is some active rotary torque applied to the skis. However, as I think about it further and realize that I am only seeing a few snapshots of the skis and not what happens inbetween I start to think that this impression may arise from not seeing the full action of the skis on the snow. Additionally I don't think that spraying snow is necessarily an indicator of substantial rotary torque applied to the ski or the tail slipping out. I can certainly spray snow without applying any rotary torque to a ski. I can also differentially spray more snow from my tail than my tip, especially in bumps where there may be variable deposits of soft snow. Finally I need to admit that I have skied with Harlald a few times in a variety of terrain. From my observations his skiing clearly has very little active rotary and so this probably biases my assessment in terms of filling in the missing gaps in this sequence of time slices. In this regard real life observation of his bump (or other skiing) does not closely resemble the representation of this sequence of time slices.
post #245 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie
So what did INSTICT have him do? Rotate those feet baby, rotate 'em!

L
This is the crux of our disagreement, because I would have written...

"Tip those feet baby, Tip em!"

I suppose we could only really know for certain if we were to ask him.

I don't know what all top level skiers do. I know from watching world cup races that they certainly all don't ski the same way. I've seen people who looked totally out of control win by seconds and people who looked the essence of grace lose by seconds.

I like PMTS because by following the movements my skiing has done nothing but improve. When I find myself skiing poorly, it is always because my balance in that situation is poor, not because I feel the PMTS movements are holding me back. I also like the organizational structure the material is presented by giving a clear path to build a foundation of balance and movement to build on top of. This is not a comparison to any other system, merely a reflection of what I have found in PMTS.

However, I did not obtain this through reading alone, and I credit my success largely to the benefit of knowledgeable, personalized, guided instruction during which no teaching system was ever mentioned, only movements and concepts. Although, at no point did I find those concepts and movements to be at odds with what PMTS teaches.
post #246 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat
OK, thanks. So, counter is a "static" position, which requires dynamic movements to get into and out of? (I'm trying to understand this!)
What I mean is that naturally the body does not normally have one part facing one way, and one the other, so to get into a "counter" must require movement, and the "holding" of muscles to keep you in that shape. (does this make sense?)

Yes - but I am taught that you should never "hold" counter... as with everything else you should slowly increase & decrease it... Hence "ski through counter.....

skiing - sinusoidal movement patterns... think of all the pendulums & springs etc etc you study in physics.... something increasing something decreasing, stopping & going the other way.... etc etc etc hence always movement when skiing - else I am static & blocking flow
post #247 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
As used in PMTS "counter" means the rotation of the pelvis (and therefore the upper body) towards the ouside of the turn. This is secondary movement and is not used to change the direction of the skis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
WTFH,

Counter is a position. Rotation is a movement that can be used to create or undo a countered position. Counter is most commonly used to describe that the lower body is facing a different direction than the upper body.

Ummm - excuse me big difference here.... rusty describes seperation between upper & lower body direction & Max no separation....
post #248 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
Now, you lift and tip your uphill foot to the LTE. What happens...
I fall down!

No seriously - I do (or did until my instuctors fixed that problem).....

You see "normal" people shift weight before lifting... being unaware of body positions I see no reason to do so & so simply do as instructed "Lift foot".... try lifting a foot before transfering weight & see how long you last!

This is the problem I see with PMTS ... they have decided what should be the case....

In my case the above was only discovered when I was LEARNING to be better balanced on 1 foot... & then I had to be taught HOW to weight transfer etc etc...

unfortunately human beings (like many other animal specimens) often decide to be the "not normal case".... what then?

In my case if I stick with PMTS I am told I cannot ski until I learn to stand on one leg....

If I go with what PMTS call TTS (which is ALL other teaching systems) I get taught to ski & my balance slowly improved along the way... but I get the FUN of skiing as I go....

which would YOU choose?

Totally prescribed systems that leave no room for variation in individuals give me the !@#$s
post #249 of 328
solipsism is nothing to be proud of Max. you read what you typed. substitute PSIA for TTS and you have your own answer.

backpedaling doesn't change things.

Harb's mention of TTS is his euphemism for PSIA.
post #250 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
Right...and the focus on the feet gives excellent control over the movements because you are initiating from a small muscle group that have fine motor control.
Max - I hate to dissapoint you but feet nerves are not connected to leg muscles... so at some point your brain is sending messages to those thigh muscles...(& it is ALWAYS getting messages back unless you are like me!)

YOU may not be conscious of doing so if your thought is" tip foot" but your body is still gonna do it....

I have been taught to start with "pronation" (yes Fox it has a rotary component along with the tip) and then work my way up as I need depending on my intention... Thing is each component is controllable so I am not locked into 1 process of tipping... I can increase rotation of femur or angulation of hips as required...

I CAN even coose to have a pure pivot to my turn entry & then feather to a carve (If I ever get good enough at the whole deal )....

for me the concept of distinct parts that have infinite numbers of combinations of intensity are preferable to a set number of "turns" that I have been prescribed as right
post #251 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
...for me the concept of distinct parts that have infinite numbers of combinations of intensity are preferable to a set number of "turns" that I have been prescribed as right
It is terrific that you have found a system that works for you. I have no problem with it and am not bashing the way you ski.

This thread was mainly about trying to understand the differences between PMTS and other systems. Lets not make is a right vs wrong discussion.
post #252 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl
I don't think anyone is saying his legs aren't rotating as Bode stated. The quesiton I would like to ask Rocca if I could is, are your legs rotating because you think about rotating your legs or because you are thinking about tipping your feet?

I suspect he would tell me he wasn't thinking about any of that and was instead thinking about getting through the next gate and winning the race.
Where did he learn to ski?
PMTS - then HH would KNOW that he was a student....

Austrians teach active rotary...
French teach active rotary
Swiss teach active rotary
BASI teach active rotary
CSIA teach active rotary
APSI teach active rotary

I have had lessons with at least one of each of these (Have you?)
They all tend to teach decreased rotary at intermediate levels but i have never had one tell me that high level skiers do not actively turn the skis as & when needed...
IN FACT - if you read my posts you would see that the opposite occurred .... I like strong edges... they give me a feeling of safety.... it is far easier for me to balance on an edged ski than a flat one.... HOWEVER these guys (the staatlich & CSIA's mainly) have convinced me that I MUST learn to pivot better.... (active steering!) I can already tighten turn as ssh described - they want a pure pivot I don't really have one...

I am learning!
post #253 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
As used in PMTS "counter" means the rotation of the pelvis (and therefore the upper body) towards the ouside of the turn. This is secondary movement and is not used to change the direction of the skis.
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Counter is a position. Rotation is a movement that can be used to create or undo a countered position. Counter is most commonly used to describe that the lower body is facing a different direction than the upper body.
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
Ummm - excuse me big difference here.... rusty describes seperation between upper & lower body direction & Max no separation....
That is a very good observation that I missed.

Rusty, are we talking about the same thing with regards to counter? In my case I'm talking about the feet/legs pointing in one direction while the upper body and pelvis face another.
post #254 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
It is terrific that you have found a system that works for you. I have no problem with it and am not bashing the way you ski.

This thread was mainly about trying to understand the differences between PMTS and other systems. Lets not make is a right vs wrong discussion.

MAX - DIANA told me I CANNOT ski - because I can't stand on 1 leg.... the WHOLE system is built on this rigidness!!!
they cannot adapt - because their system makes no allowances!

I may be the extreme - what about the others close to low end normal but not in middle range? Do we throw them out with the bath water too?

I can tell you which muscles move - because I have to develop a movement pattern in my brain for every single movement....

You may think that it is simple to say "I only tip" it is a furfy - it don't happen like that mate! It may be a way for some to conceptualise the thing- it sure does not happen....
post #255 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
MAX - DIANA told me I CANNOT ski - because I can't stand on 1 leg.... the WHOLE system is built on this rigidness!!!
they cannot adapt - because their system makes no allowances!

I may be the extreme - what about the others close to low end normal but not in middle range? Do we throw them out with the bath water too?

I can tell you which muscles move - because I have to develop a movement pattern in my brain for every single movement....

You may think that it is simple to say "I only tip" it is a furfy - it don't happen like that mate! It may be a way for some to conceptualise the thing- it sure does not happen....
I believe that these comments are a total misrepresentation. Disski has clearly stated before that these impressions are based on a single phone call with Diana. Such a phone call opens up great opportunity for misinterpretation from both sides. Who knows what Diana though or understood about Disski's abilities or disabilities.

Contrary to these accusations that have been repeated by Dissski in numerous posts I have first hand experience with Harald, Diana, and PMTS in regards to adrressing things out of the norm, especially related to disability. I participated in a couple of instructor camps during a period where I first attended having a hip with severe degenrative arthritis, no internal rotation, limited flexion, etc. Harald easily and readily addressed my situation specifically altering approaches to accommodate my disabilites. The next year when I returned to another instructor camp, I was just returning from hip surgery, could not yet load my newly replaced hip, and like Disski could not stand on one foot. Again, Harald and Diana had no difficulty helping me to find ways to ski more effectively under those conditions that I would have thought possible.
post #256 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si
I believe that these comments are a total misrepresentation. Disski has clearly stated before that these impressions are based on a single phone call with Diana. .
thats an out and out lie Si

I have NEVER spoken to diana on the phone... Nor have I ever claimed to.... wanna tell me when and where I clearly stated this?

I did have a series of emails though... Hmmmm maybe I have a copy of one somewhere.... (like the last one?) .....

now is it on this puter or the home one?
post #257 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
More likely he'd say that you are working harder than you need to be in the conditions you are in that aren't deep powder.
sorry, Max. don't quite trust your judgment yet. parrots are a dime a dozen.
post #258 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
thats an out and out lie Si

I have NEVER spoken to diana on the phone... Nor have I ever claimed to.... wanna tell me when and where I clearly stated this?

I did have a series of emails though... Hmmmm maybe I have a copy of one somewhere.... (like the last one?) .....

now is it on this puter or the home one?
Perhaps you used the word conversation to refer to your emails? Doesn't really matter I think, my point remains the same. You have had no in person interaction with Diana or Harald on the snow or otherwise yet you make some strong and generalized accusations about their capability and willingness to deal with varying abilites. I have direct, repeated experience that this is a total misrepresentation and will gladly call you on it when I see such posts.
post #259 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si
generalized accusations about their capability and willingness to deal with varying abilites

no I stated what happened - Diana blew me off.... she insisted that anyone that can walk can balance on 1 leg... when I continued to assure her i could not & had medical proof she told me I had to go learn to do so before i could ski.... after I pointed out I was skiing she sort of decided not to bother any more....



I believe YOU stated i had clearly said something I have never said because someone proposed such on realskiers & you simply swallowed it hook line & sinker without checking with the source.... how unusual would that be...
post #260 of 328
damn - no copies of emails from then on this puter.... maybe on the one in oz....

anyway - that is what I remember she did.... if she wants to come & contend something different then let her.... & she can answer all the "rotary/non-rotary/counter" etc stuff while she is here.....
post #261 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
Rusty, are we talking about the same thing with regards to counter? In my case I'm talking about the feet/legs pointing in one direction while the upper body and pelvis face another.
Sorry Max,

I don't know what you are talking about. My definition of counter was a more generic definition than what you included in your last post, but totally different from what I read in your first post where you defined the word counter as a verb meaning rotation of the pelvis. Thus I understand your two posts to provide two subtly different definitions.

I defined counter as a noun. As far as I know the accepted ski industry definition of counter does not include how the position is achieved. It is possible to be in a countered position with the hips facing in the same direction as the feet (shoulders to belly button in a different direction) or with the hips and the shoulders aligned differently from the feet. Although not commonly done, my definition of counter could also be used to describe the relationship between the feet and the knees or the head and the shoulders.

The PSIA Alpine Technical manual defines a "countered stance" as
Quote:
"a form of anticipation and a way to create a relationship between the upper and lower body that helps block rotary momentum. A countered stance is typically used when the inside (uphill) half of the body leads the outside (downhill) half through the turn; this allows for effective stacking of the bones and muscles to deal with forces. We call this a strong inside half because the strength and functional tension of the inside half of the body facilitates steering with the legs."
Hmm - counter facilitates steering with the legs. That sounds like blasphemy for PMTS. We could argue (until the cows come home) that PMTS and PSIA have a fundamental disagreement about biomechanics here. Instead, I propose that we only have a difference in semantics. Substitute "tipping" for "steering" and compare video of PMTS turns showing counter and PSIA turns showing counter and we have exactly the same thing.
post #262 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
no I stated what happened - Diana blew me off.... she insisted that anyone that can walk can balance on 1 leg... when I continued to assure her i could not & had medical proof she told me I had to go learn to do so before i could ski.... after I pointed out I was skiing she sort of decided not to bother any more....

I believe YOU stated i had clearly said something I have never said because someone proposed such on realskiers & you simply swallowed it hook line & sinker without checking with the source.... how unusual would that be...
Sorry never saw anything relating to you at Real skiers - I rarely view that site.

Here's one of your generalizations:
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
This is the problem I see with PMTS ... they have decided what should be the case....
The point I'm making is that your comments make it seem like you had a direct experience with PMTS when in actuality you've had none. Given that I have direct experience with a situation of PMTS and disability I think it's only fair to present that experience as I've done.
post #263 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
I have had lessons with at least one of each of these (Have you?)
Are you saying that all of those organizations teach the racers the same things they teach to the general public? Is that true? How did Rocca learn to ski? What do the Italian race coaches teach him?

My point here is that unless someone is an authority on Rocca, we can't really do anything other than make a conjecture about what Rocca learned and does instinctually.
post #264 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si
Sorry never saw anything relating to you at Real skiers - I rarely view that site.

Here's one of your generalizations:


The point I'm making is that your comments make it seem like you had a direct experience with PMTS when in actuality you've had none. Given that I have direct experience with a situation of PMTS and disability I think it's only fair to present that experience as I've done.
No it is the outcome of MY experience - want me to go through all of your posts on what PSIA does or does not do? Have you been in EVERY PSIA lesson? NO.... your statements reflect YOUR experience...

Is DIANA not part of PMTS? She answered THEIR email address from the online lessons... (yes I tried them)....

What YOU mean is I did not fork out a heap of money to travel to HH and spend more money having a lesson with his ski school but instead used HIS online lessons and contact email address....
As one of the "big" plusses professed by the PMTS disciples is that you can "buy the book" or "use the website" and I did so you might want to suggest what was so wrong about this effort - remember there were no PMTS lessons closer to me than about 17 hours flying time at that point in time....
post #265 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
she insisted that anyone that can walk can balance on 1 leg... when I continued to assure her i could not & had medical proof
Disski, this isn't an attack or disagreement with you, as I am genuinely curious here. How do you walk if you can't balance on one foot?

I'm sure the process was a difficult one to learn without the benefit of the try/fix feedback loop we are usually gifted with.

Are you saying that the process by which you walk is not sufficient to allow you to stand on one foot? So you can balance when you walk but that skill doesn't transfer to other movements?

I do admire your dedication to overcomming the limitations that would have prevented most people from even thinking about skiing.
post #266 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl
Are you saying that all of those organizations teach the racers the same things they teach to the general public? Is that true? How did Rocca learn to ski? What do the Italian race coaches teach him?

My point here is that unless someone is an authority on Rocca, we can't really do anything other than make a conjecture about what Rocca learned and does instinctually.

Exactly my point....

I have skied with many different system instructors - all teach it a little differently in some way to get to the higher levels - but all teach the same basic mechanics (if with different words)....

PMTS seem sooooo hooked on downing PSIA they forget that the rest of the world are NOT PSIA....


(oooh I forgot I skied with an italian ex-FIS racer too.... btw he taught active rotary as well)

Our ski school has had some of the austrian B team over.... they can ski!.... the other austrians assure me that these guys still teach PIVOT to their racers(this is when they are still trying to convince me to work on the pivot) they offered to get me to talk to the B team guy & try to get him to only use angulation - they assured me he would laugh at me
post #267 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl
Disski, this isn't an attack or disagreement with you, as I am genuinely curious here. How do you walk if you can't balance on one foot?

I'm sure the process was a difficult one to learn without the benefit of the try/fix feedback loop we are usually gifted with.

Are you saying that the process by which you walk is not sufficient to allow you to stand on one foot? So you can balance when you walk but that skill doesn't transfer to other movements?

I do admire your dedication to overcomming the limitations that would have prevented most people from even thinking about skiing.
yes - when you walk you essentially can sort of "fall" onto the swinging leg & it catches you.... so it is a set of rebalancing not a "balance" operation.... also babies teach themselves to GO not to stand like a stork (well not normally) ... so i have a set of brain pathways that compensate for my loss by using other feedback for the process of "walk"

To give you an idea I could never go "step,kick,step,kick" this totally frustrated some poor women teaching jazz ballet - the gym guys sent me to her because she was known for patience... I could memorise very complex sequences but was unable to step/kick.... because I only know WALK which is putting each foot down not holding balance on one while kicking the one that should go down....

re the "controlled falling" of walking... some skiing is like this - think of those who do a big "huck over" to change sides skiing... they essentially fall down hill as a result of the big huck - they are NOT balanced there... but will regain balance & then huck again....
Compare this to RICK's ILE..... much less disconnect when done well...

I could probably have walked in better control if I had better one leg balance - the point is I can walk without it....
(Note I have no ankle ligaments according to physios as i fell off my own feet so often as a child - so that gives you an idea how many years it was until I learnt to walk well )
post #268 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
.. want me to go through all of your posts on what PSIA does or does not do? Have you been in EVERY PSIA lesson?
Sure, as I do my best to not bash (like some others here are so fond of). Also, I try to make every effort to point out that I am making a generalization when such is the case. I'm certainly not perfect in this but it is my intent. Also, a point to realize is that I have been in a variety of PSIA lessons with PSIA instructors and have observed others. As far you have reported you have never participated in a PMTS lesson nor directly observed one.
post #269 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl
Are you saying that the process by which you walk is not sufficient to allow you to stand on one foot? So you can balance when you walk but that skill doesn't transfer to other movements?
and again - yes - as an example in my twenties I could not lift one foot up 1 inch above the floor & remain on the other for a count of 5... (not 5 seconds just counting to 5)... In case you wonder how i know - gym guys testing me as I kept doing odd things when doing exercise....

I can "simulate" 1 foot balance by substituting visuals these days... but do poorly with eyes closed or if there are no vertical lines.... don't ask what happens if the vertical line moves off vertical...

Again as a result of skiing lessons I have built brain pathways that substitute for the missing ones a little... BUT only a little... I am very reliant on foot feel & hence the ski/snow interaction... hence powder is my nightmare(less feedback) and I like hardpack & well tuned skis with good edge feel... I dislike flat skis in any version & hate skidding(like standing in a noisy room if you are hearing impaired I guess) ...
post #270 of 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si
Sure, as I do my best to not bash (like some others here are so fond of). Also, I try to make every effort to point out that I am making a generalization when such is the case. I'm certainly not perfect in this but it is my intent. Also, a point to realize is that I have been in a variety of PSIA lessons with PSIA instructors and have observed others. As far you have reported you have never participated in a PMTS lesson nor directly observed one.

I participated in their online lesson.... or is that not PMTS either like Diana is not?

She is one of their senior instructors is she not? She DID say she was not able to help me if i could not balance on 1 leg.... so which bit of that "unable to adapt" did I represent wrongly?

Conversely other instructors helped me with graded balance challenges etc over the internet...... including skating, hiking, bike-riding, etc.... (did you ever read the excellent "warm up body perception" bit RICK wrote for me for start of season?)....

THAT is my experience with PMTS....

in other words - I'll take ANY instructor that knows their stuff & GIVES A DAMN & can think outside the square...

DIANA (as a representative of PMTS) did NOT meet my needs!
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