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More video to critique

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Well here is some groomer skiing at Hidden Valley, PA. Everything the same as the Jay Peak Video, except the snow was refrozen slush. TomB here is your "normal skiing"

http://www.autoxphotos.com/other/HV%20skiing.wmv
post #2 of 22
Sking for the camera on groomed bunny slopes Shame on you!

Get rid of the girly skis and get back in the stuff where you belong
Was that fun?

PS: I would have demostrated the (Fish hook) on that slope.
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Not as much as Jay Peak, but its whats I have near my house. Trust me a move is in my future.

It was to do MA purely, the tree skiing was just to have a blast skiing.
post #4 of 22
It's looking good. Many basic elements are there. However, I do see one glaring technical point that you could work on to improve immensely. Your initiation appears to be in the form of simply rotating your feet and chucking your tails out sideways. You tend to throw your hip inside at initiation to achieve this.

While the hip is a very powerful joint that is critical for generating speed and power, it should only be activated once a stable base is established. What you need to work on is activating those ankles and knees before the hip is used so that you can get that stable platform and generate a ton of speed.

The first thing you need to do is widen your stance. The narrow stance you have inhibits your ankles and knees from working and moves straight to the hip. By having an exaggeratedly wide stance, your knees and ankles will have no choice but to roll.

Also, try skiing with your boots unclipped and really feel those ankles rolling at the start of your turn.

With a wide stance and boots unclipped, you can try the airplane drill, where you gradually touch your outside boot with your outside hand throughout the turn.

Also, you can try spaghetti legs, where you roll both ankles inward and then both ankles outward, making hourglass-like tracks in the snow. Really focus on the ankles when you do this drill.

Edit: I just watched the rest of the video and you seem to be using the ankles and knees in your longer turns. Try and ski more like that in slalom. Just remember that slalom is mini-GS - the mechanics of the turn are the same.

In your longer turns, work on keeping you upper body facing down the hill. By following your skis, your hip is rotated back over your skis toward the end of the turn, killing your grip. Then, because you're now facing the wrong way, your initiation happens by throwing your hip right into the turn, rather than knees and ankles. If you square it out, you will see results. Video is a good tool to measure this skill, given that it's hard to feel when you're doing it right and not just merely better.
post #5 of 22
I have to agree with D(C)'s comments. Your short turns can be improved. Tails should follow tips, so pressure the tips and let the tails carve or scarve along the same path. Resist swinging the tails laterally.

Still, amazing skiing for 4 years experience!
post #6 of 22
You are skiing well in this video and the other one. I particularly like your long turns.


If you look 0:15 and 1:13 your hips are slightly behind your feet near the bottom of the turn. It isn’t much, but it is enough to contribute the initiation issues DC describes. Why is this happening? Its hard to tell from the video, but I would guess your hip is dropping back and inside.


My suggestions would be to focus on moving with your skis throughout the turn. If your hips stay centered that will allow you to move smoothly into the new turn. I would also work on a more progressive turn entry that originates from the feet.


I think I’m going to get grief for suggesting this, but I would have you do stem steps with the twin focuses of moving the CM forward and inside of the turn and creating a round, progressive turn. Once that is working well, I would move onto whitepass turns. They are very trendy this season and from what I hear almost certain at level 3.

I think we are in the same boat: small PA mountain, not much skiing experience, L2 trying for L3. Good luck.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
thanks for the feedback so far, its giving me something to work on.

I have a good stance IMO in longer turns in fact most comment are on how wide it is, but in short turns I have problems steering in a wider stance so i go narrow although usually not as narrow as the first clip. any tips besides rolling the ankles and knees first to make a wider stance seem more "natural". Also is there any chance that my fairly stiff boots that i love so much for carving on PA ice are holding me back in the short turns?

I have actuallly been doing whitepass turns and one footed skiing alot this year. kinda of fun balance drills and teach softening the outside leg to transtion well, instead of extending the inside leg.

Keep the post coming.
post #8 of 22
Finally got to view the video. Yesterday, every time I hit on the link, the connection started and then self-closed.

I agree the short turns have a bit too much squirt in the tails as though you're really pushing hard on the boot cuff to get the tails to break loose. It looks to me as though your short-turn focus is on the outside ski totally and you're merely keeping the inside ski in close proximity. I'd like to see you think more about the inside ski in short turns just like you do in the longer ones.

What I'd do is try funneling down. That is, do some longer turns and gradually reduce the radius and pick up the intensity while trying to maintain the same sensations for both feet.

I also agree that there's almost a hip thrust to all your turns. Watch the spot where you're standing up to cross a flat section of hill and then watch how you begin the first turn in the next series of shorter turns.

Spend a little time each day on more gentle terrain with not quite so much turn finish and feel a more progressive increase of edging from the ankles. Really feel your arches and little toe edges from the bottom up rather than from the top down.

Your skiing is wonderful considering the time you've been at it. Keep having fun with it.
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA
I have a good stance IMO in longer turns in fact most comment are on how wide it is, but in short turns I have problems steering in a wider stance so i go narrow although usually not as narrow as the first clip. any tips besides rolling the ankles and knees first to make a wider stance seem more "natural". Also is there any chance that my fairly stiff boots that i love so much for carving on PA ice are holding me back in the short turns?.
My brain is fried from work, so bare with me. You have issues steering in a wider stance, hmmmm. I would try the funneling down drill maintaing the same stance and see what the answers to these questions are.

Where is the pivot point on the ski? At the tip or underfoot?
Is there a point in the turn that steering is easier or more difficult?
Is this happening with both legs or just one?
Does the speed of the turn impact it?

I wish I could say more, but no one is home upstairs.
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
Well I went over to springs and did a clinic on thinking in the future of your skiing(aka gettign CM down the hill instead of accross), Jim Pottinger(examiner at springs) is the man, as soon as I get some free time expect updated videos.

Also the funneling helps but I also created my own drill to work ankle flew and pivoting underneath the foot I took the "spaghetti legs" and started doing in turns as small as i can do. My stance has gotten wider but not wide enough yet. thanks for the helps hopefully I ll be able to get some more video soon.

Also it was pionted out by my clown(ex girlfriend) that I am dipping my shoulder ever so slighty especialy in bump skiing. I say shes a clone cause shes a very good visual learner and basically copied me.
post #11 of 22
Bush, sorry if I've missed it elsewhere; what length skis are you on?

thanks for posting the video.
post #12 of 22
As you are on metron b5's, there is no reason that you can't carve those SL-ish turns. You will need to get a lot farther forward, and work on initiating with the feet, as others have said. Still, excellent for 4 years of skiing. The GS turns aren't that bad at all.
post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=35159 my info was posted in this thread orginally i have lost 10lb since then.

I should of been able to carve the smaller turns and think I am able to do it now. My only excuse that day it was pretty solid hard pack and the only reason I was able to GS so well is my edges are kept very very sharp.

Skis are 162cm B5s and although great for matching examiers turns in exams and absolute hoot to ski on, I have found the limit at speed, and should be on something closer to 175-180 next year for all mountian charging.(volkl AC4 or Metron M-Ex? no clue yet)

More video coming as soon I dont teach 8 hours of lessons a day.
post #14 of 22
[quote=jess]You are skiing well in this video and the other one. I particularly like your long turns.


I think I’m going to get grief for suggesting this, but I would have you do stem steps with the twin focuses of moving the CM forward and inside of the turn and creating a round, progressive turn. Once that is working well, I would move onto whitepass turns. They are very trendy this season and from what I hear almost certain at level 3.

I'm not sure that stemming would be the way to go if you want your CM to move into the turn. I do agree that the rest of your assessment is good.--Wigs
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C)
It's looking good. Many basic elements are there. However, I do see one glaring technical point that you could work on to improve immensely. Your initiation appears to be in the form of simply rotating your feet and chucking your tails out sideways. You tend to throw your hip inside at initiation to achieve this.

While the hip is a very powerful joint that is critical for generating speed and power, it should only be activated once a stable base is established. What you need to work on is activating those ankles and knees before the hip is used so that you can get that stable platform and generate a ton of speed.

The first thing you need to do is widen your stance. The narrow stance you have inhibits your ankles and knees from working and moves straight to the hip. By having an exaggeratedly wide stance, your knees and ankles will have no choice but to roll.

Also, try skiing with your boots unclipped and really feel those ankles rolling at the start of your turn.

With a wide stance and boots unclipped, you can try the airplane drill, where you gradually touch your outside boot with your outside hand throughout the turn.

Also, you can try spaghetti legs, where you roll both ankles inward and then both ankles outward, making hourglass-like tracks in the snow. Really focus on the ankles when you do this drill.

Edit: I just watched the rest of the video and you seem to be using the ankles and knees in your longer turns. Try and ski more like that in slalom. Just remember that slalom is mini-GS - the mechanics of the turn are the same.

In your longer turns, work on keeping you upper body facing down the hill. By following your skis, your hip is rotated back over your skis toward the end of the turn, killing your grip. Then, because you're now facing the wrong way, your initiation happens by throwing your hip right into the turn, rather than knees and ankles. If you square it out, you will see results. Video is a good tool to measure this skill, given that it's hard to feel when you're doing it right and not just merely better.
I agree with some of your assessment on the short radius turns, but have to disagree with what you suggest this skier do to fix the large radius turns. What this skier is doing in those turns is closer to modern skiing than what you are asking the skier to change. I personally like what I am seeing in those turns with the exception of I would like to see the skier a bit taller and forward some. There was an observation that the hips were back some and I see this also. This is keeping the skier from moving throughout the turn and this is giving the appearance of "Park And Ride" My suggestion is to stand taller, bring the hips up over the feet better, and continue to move through the turn. ---------Wigs
post #16 of 22
Just a side note and not to take anything away from the poster as I don't know what catagory he falls in. But, 4 years doesn't mean anything. Sure that's extremely impressive technique if it's mostly self learned and he skis a handfull of times a year. On the other hand, if he's going 60+ days/year and has had lot's of instruction than what's the big deal? Good skiing for sure but not impossible to achieve by a good athlete in 4 years.
post #17 of 22
I've been a little to "rippy" in my MA. So, nice skiing! Stay a little softer on your outside ski and I agree with Wiggs, your tipping too much on gs turns and it is causing your hip to drop behind. A taller stance will allow you to be more centered over your skis and not get overflexed into your boot tongue causing some tail wash.

Quiet down your short turns, being a little more patient in the transition. That will allow you to flatten your skis so the upper body will quiet down (it's rotation).

Rip on!

RW
post #18 of 22
I think anybody being able to ski this well after 4 years is very impressive. The fact he has already passed his Level 2 exam supports the great progress made. With the progression that has been made , its possible he could pass a Level 3 with 5 years of skiing under his belt. I'm not qualified to make that assessment but he sure looks to be on track of doing that.

I'm biased about this young man as I remember he went out and hiked his first turns this past November. With that kind of enthusiasm and desire , he'll never stop getting better. Plus he has done all this while residing in the bananna belt of skiing . SW Pa.

I'll give BushWackerin one piece of advice; change elevations by about 8,000 ft.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
I think anybody being able to ski this well after 4 years is very impressive. The fact he has already passed his Level 2 exam supports the great progress made. With the progression that has been made , its possible he could pass a Level 3 with 5 years of skiing under his belt. I'm not qualified to make that assessment but he sure looks to be on track of doing that.

I'm biased about this young man as I remember he went out and hiked his first turns this past November. With that kind of enthusiasm and desire , he'll never stop getting better. Plus he has done all this while residing in the bananna belt of skiing . SW Pa.

I'll give BushWackerin one piece of advice; change elevations by about 8,000 ft.
That is what it takes to pass an L3? (Or an L2 for that matter) :
post #20 of 22
Here are a couple of points that I'd focus on to improve your skiing.

Width of stance is fine, don't try to widen you stance, but work on your balance. Remember that a wider stance = better stability, but a little narrower = more agility. Therefore, narrower stance for slalom-type turns is fine ... as long as you're balanced.

You should try one-ski balancing exercises, which are a challenge and can just be plain fun. Try skiing on the outside ski, lifting the inside ski up a little - make sure you are balanced throughout the turn (or as much as possible) on the outside ski - don't cheat or fake it. This could take awhile to perfect, but keep trying.

In order to balance on the outside ski properly you'll need to use counter-rotation (counter balance). THis means make sure you're shoulders and hips are pointed down the slope and NOT too square on your skis.

You'll also need to bend (angulate) to get your upper body more over your outside ski.

Balance is the key to great skiing - for more of a challenge try skiing on only the inside ski

Oops ... I guess I should say what I see in your video: The main things is as others have mentioned, (1) the sliding of the tails and (2) in long turns you often have too much weight on the inside ski. Doesn't hurt too much on gentle terrain like the video, but on steeper stuff it's gonna be trouble.

That's my two cents and thanks for welcoming new people to your forum.
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
I agree the short turns have a bit too much squirt in the tails as though you're really pushing hard on the boot cuff to get the tails to break loose.
that's what I notice most from my non-pro, gaper perspective. looks like an intentional sideways push to hurry the turn finish, or square it off.

as a fellow non-pro, I'd say that such a turn finish is not a horribly bad thing to use in moguls or tight trees, but... it's not an optimal tactic. you are giving up on the best part of the turn, the bottom part where you can give a tiny bit of heel pressure bias underfoot and feel the tail pop you into the next turn. that's what makes linked turns on packed/groomed terrain so fun!
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
I think anybody being able to ski this well after 4 years is very impressive. The fact he has already passed his Level 2 exam supports the great progress made. With the progression that has been made , its possible he could pass a Level 3 with 5 years of skiing under his belt. I'm not qualified to make that assessment but he sure looks to be on track of doing that.

I'm biased about this young man as I remember he went out and hiked his first turns this past November. With that kind of enthusiasm and desire , he'll never stop getting better. Plus he has done all this while residing in the bananna belt of skiing . SW Pa.

I'll give BushWackerin one piece of advice; change elevations by about 8,000 ft.
agreed, BushWacker skis very well for 4 yrs' experience.

and agreed on the need to go where the real hills are. I can say that as one who grew up skiing the mid-Atlantic terrain where BushWacker now skis.
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