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So, a skiier walks into a gym...

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
With a ski specific workout in mind. the most important things to work on, the first thing she/he heads for is ____________.

(complete the sentence.)

My answer:

Leg press,
hamstring curls
abductor/adductor
ab and core strengtheners
post #2 of 42
.......a warm up exercise.

A stationary bike is good - no impact on joints
post #3 of 42
Warm up, then stretching...

Michael
post #4 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaA
With a ski specific workout in mind. the most important things to work on, the first thing she/he heads for is ____________.

(complete the sentence.)

My answer:

Leg press,
hamstring curls
abductor/adductor
ab and core strengtheners
Elliptical machine!(45 min)
sissy squats(with weight)
Abs(incline bench)
Then to Ruby Tuesday's for the Chocolate Tall Cake!
post #5 of 42
after the warm up & stretch....

Lunges - to unstable surface, from unstable base....recover forward or back, lunge backwards, etc etc
Stabilty ball hamstring curl thingies....
ummm - heaps of other stability ball stuff that I have to stop & think about or look up....
Calf raises....(& stretches...)
Wall sits - unstable surface ball behind back....
Single leg squat - unstable surface

skipping... (I can't skip but they swear it is good for faster feet)
run, jump & stop on small trampoline thingy
medicine ball catching jumping off box thingy
post #6 of 42
Oh & of course all the stuff like crunches on ball, side raises on ball, push ups feet on ball, hold body on elbow on ball etc etc
post #7 of 42
Truth be told, most skiers would start chatting up the first attractive person they see, and instantly forget the reason why they came!!

Cheers,

Michael
post #8 of 42
Elliptical machine. I love the elliptical .
post #9 of 42
Squat rack!!
post #10 of 42
Nice job, everyone! I'm glad too see that there is no mention of the leg extension machine! This means that your ski-fitness knowledge base is higher than that of the trainers at the Silverthorne Rec Center, which can partially explain the number of torn ACLs in Summit County. :

For those of you who are only doing strength training, keep in mind that you need to integrate it with balance training. At his Tueday night Movement Analysis sessions, Bob Barnes talks about the type of skiers who "muscle" all their turns.
post #11 of 42
I like squats. But I like high reps, slow movement up and down to simulate the duration of a turn while skiing, and fairly low weight. I use an upright rower attachment to a lat bar instead of a long bar over my shoulders. It's a lot more comfortable, and if I want, I can pull it up (row) to get a bit of an upper body workout at the same time. I do sets of 30 reps, with about 70-80lbs, and do lots of sets. When I used to have my weight bench in my rec room, and could work out while watching tv and being part of the family, I'd do at least 10 sets.

I hate ellipticals, because they don't seem to provide much of a workout other than cardio, but even then, not as good as a bike that's set to a more difficult setting.

Then you also need to do core exercises. How about twisting crunches with a weight on your chest.

If you race, do tricep exercises for a good start out of the gate.
post #12 of 42
LisaMarie, curious about your leg extension comment.
post #13 of 42
First of all, the reason for many skier injuries and poor technique is a hamstring/quad mucular imbalance. Since the quads are usually much stronger than the hamstrings, you seriously don't want to do an exercise like the leg extension mahine that uses them in isolation.

Leg exercises can either be open chain or closed chain. Open chain exercises like the leg extension allow the foot to move freely. They can cause shearing forces on the knee. Unfortunately, shearing, forces push the tibia forward and the femur back. The result is a whole lot of stress on the knee. Shearing forces are the same forces that cuase an ACL injury, so every set you do on the leg extension machine makes that injury more likely to happen.
post #14 of 42
I dont go the gym ... I biked about 6000 miles over last summer/fall.. That definetely helped my skiing.. a lot.. Not too sure how the quad/hamstring balance works there though...
post #15 of 42
Quads, hamstrings, leg adductors (pulling legs together), core, and balanced exercises on all parts of the body. Use inflated balance discs and the big ball for standing, seated, and reclining weight exercises...helps with core stability and balance.

Plus cardio.. Plus stretching.

Hill climbing on a bike standing on the pedals is great for quads, core, and balance.
post #16 of 42

48 year old desperately seeking fitness and skiing nirvana

My first trip of the season is coming up in 25 days--and I'm taking some extra time in February to insure that I'm in better shape. What do you guys think about spinning classes for cardio and improving leg strength/ski fitness?

How much cardio and are pylometrics a good idea? I'm doing about an hour of cardio each day and HIT intervals 3 times a week (90% max HR reached in a pyramid 3-5x during 45 session, otherwise at 75% HR). I vary hard/easy days and use an ARCStrider at the gym when not doing spinning. Additionally I lift 4 times a week, 2 days lower/2 days upper ( no more than 25 sets). I want to add in pylometrics but friends tell me thats over kill and I should just stick with my current routine.

Finally, does any one do deadlifts for ski training? How do they work for you?


Mike
post #17 of 42
How is a stationary bike or elliptical trainer at getting you into skiing shape? I can't lift anymore due to back issues (arthritis and bad discs), so I need something lower impact. My skiing wouldn't be considered low impact, but I enjoy it too much to quit, so I could definitely use some more conditioning. . .

MJL48 - I am no longer doing any training currently, but I was doing some pretty intensive weight training a little over a year ago before I found out that I have a bad back. . . Anyhow, I would highly recommend deadlifts as a an exercise, maybe not specifically for skiing, but if you want to bulk up, deadlifts and squats are the best choices when done with *proper* technique. You have to be very careful with both exercises as they have the capacity to injure you quite easily if not done properly, especially if you are lifting substantial weight. The minimum weight you should consider for a deadlift is 135 lbs as that will be a 45lb plate on each side, getting the bar high enough from the ground. If you can't do that much weight, you can block the bar up higher, or do partial deadlifts in a power rack. Just remember, a deadlift is a *combination* of back and leg, don't try to lift with only the back, or only the legs, you must use both.

-dath
post #18 of 42
I have found that doing the ellipical without hold onto the handles with your hands is, in addition to a good cardio workout, a good balance workout. If I do a 30 minutes session, I try to do five minutes foward and five minutes backwards with no hands.

In the gym I mostly do strength stuff with free weights and a few machines to try to maintain my muscle mass as I age. I know I don't do enough balance stuff. And I have three dynadiscs, a balance ball and some foam rollers at home. Shame on me, I could be doing it while I watch TV with my kid.
post #19 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn
I have found that doing the ellipical without hold onto the handles with your hands is, in addition to a good cardio workout, a good balance workout. If I do a 30 minutes session, I try to do five minutes foward and five minutes backwards with no hands.
Same here. I find that going backwards on an elliptical machine without holding onto the handles is very helpful in developing the type of balance needed for bump skiing.
post #20 of 42
Thread Starter 
I find the elliptical to be an excelent cardio workout, good for endurance on the slopes, and has very little impact on the knees of us ACL veterans.

My trainer just gave me a new cardio workout, involving elliptical sprints...warm up, one minute of sprinting (fast and hard) to two minutes of normal pace. Im excited to try it. then I hve some fast walking on the treadmill, at a high incline. (running still kills my knee.)

stairmster is also good.
post #21 of 42
Don't forget balance exercises!

Balance board, Bosu ball - hundreds of exercises

Hamstring stretch - stand on one leg, hold other ankle up to butt
Yoga T pose (sic)- stand on one leg, other leg and upper body (clasp hands together in front of head too) go horizontal to form a "T"
(for extra credit perform those last 2 on a cushy mat instead of a hard floor and do it with eyes closed)
post #22 of 42
45 - 90 mins on the elliptical trainer

Some combination of:
Abs (lots with stability ball)
Squats
Lunges (regular and curtsy)
Funky pelvic tilt thing with one foot on stability ball, other leg in the air (awesome for hammies and glutes if done right, bye-bye lower back if done wrong!)
Wall sits (doing shoulder press at same time)
Bicep curls standing on one leg on a squishy pad
Bench Press
Triceps with cable
Rows

If some combination of sick two-year-old or dog intervenes (frequent), then I either do:

Nothing

Or

Break out the bomb-proof, largely metal, heavy-duty stroller we bought for Canadian winters (no pivoting front wheel, either, which is a real b*tch), load it up with 30lb kid, all his layers, sippy-cup, snacks, etc., grab ball-thrower for dog, wrap leash of 60lb dog that pulls around wrist and tromp around neighborhood for an hour or so, in strong Colorado Front Range winds. More of a workout than you'd think

Then try to fit in some combo of above exercises with dumbells while son is sleeping.

Makes me sore just thinking about it.
Mollmeister
post #23 of 42

Spinning Classes

I like spinning classes to help get me in or keep me in shape. Make sure you find a class that run by some hardcore cyclists or personal trainer. I've taken the classes from people who are certified to instruct spinning classes, but lacked any kind of fitness. The instructor needs to make you suffer.

I went Cat skiing last year and four of the eight people on the trip took spinning classes to get in shape for the trip. This included one of our guides, a CA snowboarder & his 60+ year father in law.

BTW - The father in law was an unbelievable skier. Very smooth. Gave me hope that if I'm still walking and eatting solid foods at 60, I'll still be skiing.
post #24 of 42
Oh. . . and plyos. Really into plyos these days. Usually do those in the yard, though, not at the gym. My son likes watching me leap and bound about like an oversized, incompetent frog. I would rather my gym friends not see me that way.

But they work, that's for sure!

Mollmeister
post #25 of 42
Find a well-trained, personal trainer.

http://www.burdenko.com/training.html
post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCWVA
I like spinning classes to help get me in or keep me in shape. Make sure you find a class that run by some hardcore cyclists or personal trainer. I've taken the classes from people who are certified to instruct spinning classes, but lacked any kind of fitness. The instructor needs to make you suffer.

I went Cat skiing last year and four of the eight people on the trip took spinning classes to get in shape for the trip. This included one of our guides, a CA snowboarder & his 60+ year father in law.

BTW - The father in law was an unbelievable skier. Very smooth. Gave me hope that if I'm still walking and eatting solid foods at 60, I'll still be skiing.
I love spin class to get my legs in order for the winter season. I take a class that is instructed by a hard core rider who also owns/operates his own physical therapy center. He is one Tough Dude!
Aside from that, I use the elliptical machine. Light weights for the upper body strength. It's all good!
post #27 of 42
Drink lots of water and cut back on the alcohol ...

come to think of it though, alcohol is about 40% water
post #28 of 42
im surprised no one mention the back
post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mollmeister
Oh. . . and plyos. Really into plyos these days. Usually do those in the yard, though, not at the gym. My son likes watching me leap and bound about like an oversized, incompetent frog. I would rather my gym friends not see me that way.

But they work, that's for sure!

Mollmeister
Plyos are great along with all kinds of balance and core stuff.
I do them at the gym though. I don't consider a workout complete until someone is scracthing there head or making some kind of comment.
"I think he's training to be a cat" was the last one I heard.
post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by onstar
im surprised no one mention the back
I don't know about most people, but I assume that an ab work out implements the back. My trainer told me (long ago when I started with her) A good ab work out always strengthens the back, and implements some targeted back work too. Maybe that's just her way of trainning.
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