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Mounting Looks on Dynastar Autodrive plate

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I just picked up a new pair of last year's Dynastar GS ski with the Autodrive plate and some Look P12 bindings. The bindings have lifters. I was a shop rat many years ago and am comfortable with binding work (within reason) but need help with a couple of specifics.

1) Do the holes on the plate need to be tapped, or can I just screw the bindings in directly? If tap, what size?

2) What kind of glue to use?

3) Do I need to take the lifters off the binding and mount directly to the plate or do I mount the binding + lifter to the plate?

Thanks!
post #2 of 16
No shop tech myself, but I can partially answer your question.

They do generally tap the pre-drilled holes and you can mount your binding either with or without the binder lifters, depending on whether you want the increased lift or not. If you decide not keep the lifter, shorter mounting screws will usually be necessary.
post #3 of 16
From my limited experience. I picked up a pair of Dynastar Skicross 9 with the same or similar autodrive (plastic) plate. I bought a set of Look P10 bindings and mounted the whole thing, riser et al, to the ski.

The autodrive plate on the Skicross 9 is plastic and I just screwed the bindings on but I had the shop do a binding check. No need to tap.

The shop wanted $45 to 'mount' these bindings.
post #4 of 16
I just bought a pair of Dynastar Comp 66 Course with a pair of P14 lifters last month and needed to have them remounted. Went into theshop to chat with the tech while he did it and watch what was going on, and he tapped the holes in the plate before mounting the bindings. I'm not completely sure if its the same plate though from the regular comp to the course- is yours the red blue and silver aluminum mounting plates with the gray plastic between them?
post #5 of 16
if you are using a drill/screwshooter the plate should accept the screws without tapping just make sure that the binding/plate interfaces are flush when you are finished

if you choos to go without lifters (i wouldn't, FIS isn't going to track you down and the ski works batter with them)
make sur to use shorter screws as under the toe you may pierce the top sheet of the ski

you do not need to use glue, but some will lubricate the holes(as will wax or grease FWIW (this is for plates only))
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info!

Standard taps are usually pretty cheap (<$5), but the ski ones are pretty expensive through tognar, etc ($12). I tried to find info on the sizing of ski taps but couldnt really find anything conclusive. It might be a standard #12, but I would guess the threads-per-inch is far lower on ski screws than on standard machine screws. Some info I did find said tapping is mostly to make sure the screw goes in straight, so I figured I would just be careful.

I tried a pilot hole by putting a screw into one of the holes and taking it out to see if the plate bulged at the hole or other signs of deformation. The threads looked very clean so I just screwed the bindings on with a bit of grease in the holes. I'll keep an eye on them for a few days and if they loosen I'll switch to locktite.

Back in the day (early 80's), we used Elmer's wood glue for all skis, except for epoxy on the occasional PITA odd-ball like Hexcel or Molnar. The main purpose was to keep moisture out of the core. That's not an issue with plates, and with metal-to-metal contact, grease is the way to go. Thanks for that tip, waxman.

Not that FIS regulations matter to me, but I was curious. The heel-boot contact distance from base of ski, with lifter, was pretty much dead-on 55mm, the FIS limit. The toe is lower, around 47mm or so, I didn't pay quite as much attention once I saw it was clearly lower.

I adjusted forward pressue by moving the screw in flush with the top of the notch in the housing. I got very snappy toe return. If this is not correct, please let me know. Though I was Look certified for 7 years, it's been almost exactly 2 decades since I last adjusted a pair of Looks.
Surprising how little they've changed.
post #7 of 16
your forward pressure sounds correct so go skiing
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim in PC
I just picked up a new pair of last year's Dynastar GS ski with the Autodrive plate and some Look P12 bindings. The bindings have lifters. I was a shop rat many years ago and am comfortable with binding work (within reason) but need help with a couple of specifics.

1) Do the holes on the plate need to be tapped, or can I just screw the bindings in directly? If tap, what size?

2) What kind of glue to use?

3) Do I need to take the lifters off the binding and mount directly to the plate or do I mount the binding + lifter to the plate?

Thanks!
On my skicross 10 the P12 is screwed directly to the ARS plate, with the lifter. The mount is very neat
Tech manual here : http://techtraining.rossignol.com/te...nual0405_l.pdf
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim in PC
Thanks for the info!

Standard taps are usually pretty cheap (<$5), but the ski ones are pretty expensive through tognar, etc ($12). I tried to find info on the sizing of ski taps but couldnt really find anything conclusive. It might be a standard #12, but I would guess the threads-per-inch is far lower on ski screws than on standard machine screws. Some info I did find said tapping is mostly to make sure the screw goes in straight, so I figured I would just be careful.

I tried a pilot hole by putting a screw into one of the holes and taking it out to see if the plate bulged at the hole or other signs of deformation. The threads looked very clean so I just screwed the bindings on with a bit of grease in the holes. I'll keep an eye on them for a few days and if they loosen I'll switch to locktite.

Back in the day (early 80's), we used Elmer's wood glue for all skis, except for epoxy on the occasional PITA odd-ball like Hexcel or Molnar. The main purpose was to keep moisture out of the core. That's not an issue with plates, and with metal-to-metal contact, grease is the way to go. Thanks for that tip, waxman.

Not that FIS regulations matter to me, but I was curious. The heel-boot contact distance from base of ski, with lifter, was pretty much dead-on 55mm, the FIS limit. The toe is lower, around 47mm or so, I didn't pay quite as much attention once I saw it was clearly lower.

I adjusted forward pressue by moving the screw in flush with the top of the notch in the housing. I got very snappy toe return. If this is not correct, please let me know. Though I was Look certified for 7 years, it's been almost exactly 2 decades since I last adjusted a pair of Looks.
Surprising how little they've changed.
I'm having the same problem with a pair of 66 Course Comps with a metal autodrive plate, trying to mount a pair of the bright blue p12's with small plastic lifter plates. It seems like the screws are too big for the holes and or that they will pierce the topsheets of the skis. I contacted the dealer I bought them from and they said that these are the right screws for the skis (and that I should have them mounted by a shop, right).

So if I put a little grease on them does this help to get them into the holes? Did you have any problems with the screws going into the top sheets?
post #10 of 16
Should add that the problem seems more like the screws are not actually going into the metal autodrive plate the way they should. Does the plate need to be tapped a little?
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj
Should add that the problem seems more like the screws are not actually going into the metal autodrive plate the way they should. Does the plate need to be tapped a little?
I'm not familiar with the Dynastar plates, but if it's anything like a VIST metal plate (3/8" aluminum) you aren't going to get anywhere without a tap.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by real9999
I'm not familiar with the Dynastar plates, but if it's anything like a VIST metal plate (3/8" aluminum) you aren't going to get anywhere without a tap.
Yeah, it looks a lot like that. I'm kind of surprised since I thought this would be no big deal. With my atomics the race plates are prethreaded, so you just screw the race bindings in, adjust the toepiece and forward pressure in the heel, and go.

Would it be possible to just use different screws on the Dynies?
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Use the stock screws and just screw them in. It takes some effort. A little dab of bike grease and big dab of elbow grease. If you have a tap, use it, but you can do it without one. Make sure you are using a #3 posidriver and that you are putting the screw in straight. Be sure the binding is flush on the plate when done.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim in PC
Use the stock screws and just screw them in. It takes some effort. A little dab of bike grease and big dab of elbow grease. If you have a tap, use it, but you can do it without one. Make sure you are using a #3 posidriver and that you are putting the screw in straight. Be sure the binding is flush on the plate when done.
If you do this make sure you try just one screw first. Tighten a few turns and then unscrew. Check the threads on the screws, make sure you are not just forcing all the thread off. Hope that makes sense. A large amount of elbow grease can get any screw into a hole, but have you just taken all the threads off. If so you are running a HUGE risk of losing your bindings from the skis with your boots and your legs still attached ..a big OOPS.

Good luck. But don't be afraid to have a go it's quite easy really. Just use some sommon sense.
post #15 of 16
I just bought a pair of Dynastar skicross 10 and Look P10 binding. Thanks for the information provided here, I mounted the bindings in about one hour. First time ever mount bindings. I think I did it alright. Here is the question.

How do I know I mounted the bindings correctly to the boots. I know I have to match the center lines on the boots to the center lines on the skis. But I can only visually check the alignments. Is there some tools I should use to make sure it is aligned correctly? As I know, a small difference in the alignment makes a big difference in performance. BTW, I did use a ruler to approximately check the alignments.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim in PC
Use the stock screws and just screw them in. It takes some effort. A little dab of bike grease and big dab of elbow grease. If you have a tap, use it, but you can do it without one. Make sure you are using a #3 posidriver and that you are putting the screw in straight. Be sure the binding is flush on the plate when done.
I used the WD40 and it went in alright, but elbow grease is certainly needed. As the screw goes in, there is a resistance in the beginning, but after few turns, it went in easily.

A Long #3 hex screw driver is absolutly needed, for that, I had to go to the hardware store to buy one for about $6.
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