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Salomon Pro Model Gun Spaceframe

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi All

I have just purchased a pair of Salomon Pro Model Gun Spaceframe boots and was wondering if anyone has tried them out yet, I have still not worn them at the slopes.

I am trying to choose between the Salomon Spaceframe and the Head S12 etc. Does anyone know of any Pros or Cons to these boots. I am 6'1", 175lb, expert skiier with skinney legs and calves that start high on my leg. I also ski Atomic B5's.

Any Information would be appreciated :

Derek
post #2 of 16
I'm your size and an upper intermediate skier. Low volume feet but average to average plus calves. I bought the Course SC model last month. I understand it is the same boot in a different color. I've skied it four days and my only issue was the top of the boot was initially tight on my lower calf. I moved the buckle to the outside notch, added a heel lift and lived with it for five days and it seems OK now. I even moved the buckle back to the middle position after the ski trip.

It is not a stiff boot, but it never felt sloppy and I never felt like I needed more support. Nice even flex. No hot spots. I would have preferred a little more upright stance but after the calf issue loosened up even the stance became more comfortable.

The literature makes a point of how secure the cuff alignment feature is. Mine is so secure I can not get the cuff adjustment (cant) to adjust at all. I've taken the screws out completely and can not move the cuff right or left. Before I go out again I'll probably find a 13 year old kid to show me how it's done!
post #3 of 16
I'm 5'10 200 with wide forefeet and low arch, I bought the S12 with green Superfeet last February based on inshop fit. The boots are great for me, I like the mid-stiff flex for freeriding. I tried some softer boots in the shop but my 90's racing style I am drawn forward and don't like boots that give out. I still need to get some work done on the boots (punch out) as if I don't unbuckle I get very sore feet after 2 runs due to the width of my feet. Overall I'm happy with them, not sure how they'd fit your calf/feet but I thought i'd chime in. Previous boot was 1st gen Solly X-Scream (97 or 98 I think).
post #4 of 16
I came very close to buying the Pro Gun last week (I have a very low volume foot) and was looking for an aggressive freeride boot. In the end I bought the Solly X2 Course Lab, the race version of the Gun. It fits like a glove. However, it is VERY stiff, minimalistic, and will take a lot of punching and tweaking to get just right. The jury is still out - I really liked the Pro Gun. If it fits you well, you won't go wrong. Super nice boot.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by adviljunky View Post
I came very close to buying the Pro Gun last week (I have a very low volume foot) and was looking for an aggressive freeride boot. In the end I bought the Solly X2 Course Lab, the race version of the Gun. It fits like a glove. However, it is VERY stiff, minimalistic, and will take a lot of punching and tweaking to get just right. The jury is still out - I really liked the Pro Gun. If it fits you well, you won't go wrong. Super nice boot.
Is any one skiing the Salomon Pro Model Gun? Curious as to how it feels on the hill.....
post #6 of 16
I ski this boot. I added some custom footbeds and the feel of edging and snow feedback is great. It can be flexed and is not overly stiff(95)
I like them alot and don't regret my purchase.
Not alot of shock but plenty of response.Great boots.The liners are heat moldable and not very thick so the fit may need to be worked a bit to get them perfected like most good boots.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
I ski this boot. I added some custom footbeds and the feel of edging and snow feedback is great. It can be flexed and is not overly stiff(95)
I like them alot and don't regret my purchase.
Not alot of shock but plenty of response.Great boots.The liners are heat moldable and not very thick so the fit may need to be worked a bit to get them perfected like most good boots.
Would you call this a good boot for cold weather skiing (i.e. less than 5 degrees?)

Thanks.
post #8 of 16
I wouldn't worry over what brand or model boot to buy. All Boot makers make boots for all different level of skier and budgets. There isn't a boot maker out there that is making a boot that is that much better then any other boot maker. For boots it is all about fit! What you need to do is find a boot that fits your foot and one that works for your level of skiing. Find a good Boot fitter. Be honest and tell the Fitter what your looking for in a boot and what you like to ski. Try on lots of boots.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utah49 View Post
I wouldn't worry over what brand or model boot to buy. All Boot makers make boots for all different level of skier and budgets. There isn't a boot maker out there that is making a boot that is that much better then any other boot maker. For boots it is all about fit! What you need to do is find a boot that fits your foot and one that works for your level of skiing. Find a good Boot fitter. Be honest and tell the Fitter what your looking for in a boot and what you like to ski. Try on lots of boots.
Not easy to do when there are no boot fitters in your area. Best I can find is a tech in a ski shop. Based on what I learned from sites like this I often know as much as they do if not more. Not what I what in a boot fitter.... What I am forced to do is ask a lot of questions here, and try on the minimal inventory in town.

I then look for inventory on line and try to get a feeling for what people use those boots for, their skiing style, and as much info about their feet and the boot fit. If I am going to spend the money on shipping to AK I don't want to have to ship to many pairs of boots back!

And the search goes on.....
post #10 of 16
Utah is right on . You buy a boot for fit as well as performance. Most top boots of any manufacturer are going to be quality boots but if they don't fit your foot shape then they won't be worth wasting your money on .
What is your foot shape? Some are wide ,most are not and also the shape of your ankle and the top of your foot can determine which boot you will buy.
Any boot can be made warm with a boot heater or a boot glove so don't sweat that detail
Share the details of fit you need and maybe we can give you some places to look. What one random guy/gal wears has no bearing on what your needs are but someone with a similar foot or bootfitting expertise can be much more helpful for you.
post #11 of 16
Using a ruler my largest foot is 25.5/26CMs and the other a solid 25CMs. I use superfeet in my hiking boots and have a low volume foot. I weigh 155lbs and have been skiing for 15 years +. I would say that I am advanced skier, but not an expert. I enjoy skiing powder and am lucky enough to live where there is a lot of lift and snow machine served backcountry.

Lange's felt to narrow, Salomon felt to wide. The Nordica Speedmachine had to much volume in a 26.5 and my larger foot had fairly moderate pressure at the tip in the 25.5. (The shop did not have a 26)

Tecnica Diablo Flame felt a little big in 26.5, but the volume was better than the Nordica 26.5. I also tried on the Garmont Andrenalin in 26 and it was a good fit. However the shell on the Garmont led me to believe that it would be the same shell in a 25.5 with just a different liner. So if I went that route I would go with a 25.5 (none in stock in town). It is the most comfortable boot I have tried on, but not sure it has the DH performance I want being an AT boot.

Current boot is a Line ski boot made by Raichele. It is a great boot, but I bought it in a 27/27.5. It is just WAY to big as I can ski around inside the boot on the way down the hill. I have used them 3 times and they are up for sale or trade.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
post #12 of 16
Check the Dalbellos . They cover a good range of fit . Some for the wider fit. The Salomon falcon boots are narrower than the Pro Gun and the x10 is a bit in between.Look into bootfitting tips you can find here and online for proper shell fit and other considerations. Maybe put an inquiry in Bud's bootfitting thread.
Good luck.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
Check the Dalbellos . They cover a good range of fit . Some for the wider fit. The Salomon falcon boots are narrower than the Pro Gun and the x10 is a bit in between.Look into bootfitting tips you can find here and online for proper shell fit and other considerations. Maybe put an inquiry in Bud's bootfitting thread.
Good luck.
Any models in particular I should look at? Not sure there is a local dealer around here to check fitting... Whats your thoughts on flex index for me?
post #14 of 16
I have a pair of 07 The Gun.. and developed metatarsalgia last winter after a 2 week ski trip tp Kicking Horse and Lake Louise/Sunshine. I am a CSIA L2 instructor 58 yrs, 160 lb. 5 10.. very fit. To combat the metatarsalgia last spring I had custom orthotics made at an Orthotics place.. not a boot fitter..but a general orthotics maker. I am still having footbed issues, (numbness, cold, pain) but at the moment my question is related to the cuff alignment. The latest orthotics I have installed are very high on the inside of the arch.. to combat over pronation. So I wonder about aligning the cuff further to the outside ..My question is.. does the Salomon method of loosening the canting screws/cams and the 2 stiffening bolts on the rear of the boot, and bending the knees forward and back several times over the center toe of the foot really do anything..? I've tried it a couple of times, and I can't see any change in the circular alignment of the canting cams.. in other words nothing seems to happen..In the past I have manually turned the cams on other boots to achieve inwardly slanted cuffs, to get more inside edge pressure sooner..just playing around but it worked. Does the fact that the cams don't turn when I do the Salomon method of cuff alignment ,mean that the alignment is correct and therefore didn't change.. or do you have to turn them manually to realign the cuff ?
Overall I almost wish I had stayed with a slightly stiffer boot.. as I think the softer flex is causing me to overload the ball of the foot (metatarsal).. which is why I developed this problem which I never had before..with race boots. I had a surefoot footbed in the boots when I developed the problem.. and they came right out of my old Rossi Power 9.3 Race Boots.. but I was looking for more flex and the Salomon rep recomended the gun..so here I amk year later with all kinds of foot problems.. I am thinking of going to Surefoot at Snowmass when I get there in 4 weeks.. maybe starting all over again..but I have already spent a lot of money on this issue.. Anyone want to jump in on this one?

Art
Eastern Canada (no bootfitter land)
post #15 of 16
I experimented with moving the circular alingment on my mine and set them via the trial and error method based on how my skis tracked on flat snow.
post #16 of 16

Since my last posting I had Surefoot make mw new foam injected liners as well as new footbeds with metatarsil pads. Wow. No more hot spots. No more foot problems. Relatively warm feet. I can ski /teach with my boots unbuckled..I highly reccommend the Surefoot Liners and footbeds.. but wear your regular thin  ski socks when you get the liners made or you won't be able to use them (your old socks)..there is no room except the room your sock creates when you get the liner made. Expensive but solves all fitting problems.

 

AB

Nova Scotia

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