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Ski Speed Limit in Switzerland

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
The first reported speed limit on a slope. The web site is in German, but here is a less than exceptional translation using Alta Vista Babelfish:

First ski runway with speed limits

[ caption: So not!]
Who when ski driving is uncertain and it concerns rather slowly, can drive immediately to standard forest in Switzerland: In the skiing area in Bernese the upper country now runway speed 30 applies on two kilometers is enough.
Despite planned controls notorious Raser does not have to make itself concerns: Punishments for speed infringements are not for the time being intended. Ruepelhafte ski drivers must however generally count on the introduction of their ski passport. In Switzerland annually approximately 45,000 sportsmen are complicated into ski accidents.
post #2 of 15
This looks like an awful photoshop someone found on a gag site like somethingawful.com or fark.com.
post #3 of 15
I think you are right in that the photo is likely a photoshop paste-up, but the story is real. Only relates to limited beginner slopes as 30 k/h is very slow (19 MPH).

Check this link for English version of story:
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/world...681751,00.html
post #4 of 15
Just re-read the Observer article and noticed:

"Speed clampdowns are already common in the United States and Canada where ski police, sometimes wearing flashing blue helmets, have the power to chase, suspend, fine and even press charges against reckless skiers."

Flashing blue helmets? Really? If anyone has seen this I would like to know where!
post #5 of 15
So are you required to staple a speedometer to your goggles so you can tell how fast you are going?
post #6 of 15
This has been discussed on Snowheads lately

http://www2.snowheads.com/ski-forum/...ic.php?t=11822
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinecone
Just re-read the Observer article and noticed:

"Speed clampdowns are already common in the United States and Canada where ski police, sometimes wearing flashing blue helmets, have the power to chase, suspend, fine and even press charges against reckless skiers."

Flashing blue helmets? Really? If anyone has seen this I would like to know where!
1) Has anyone seen ANYBODY on a US mountain w/ a flashing blue helmet?
2) On what grounds do they have the authority to issue you a ticket? Skiing fast isn't breaking any laws? On what grounds can they press charges, no one was hurt or injured?

If some douchebag in a flashing blue helmet starts writing me a ticket, you can be damn sure I'm going to ignore him.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by deltat
2) On what grounds do they have the authority to issue you a ticket? Skiing fast isn't breaking any laws? On what grounds can they press charges, no one was hurt or injured?
I'm guessing that if you are skiing in a dangerous manner, particularly in a slow zone, you are showing a serious lack of responsibility, and are a danger to others. You might think you are skiing well within yourself, but if you can't obey the rules, and be sensible, then yes, you deserve to be punished. There's too much of this attitude of "I'm good enough, I don't need to listen to someone else" Try being responsible!
post #9 of 15
The ability to "chase, suspend, fine and even press charges" is the big question I have from that article. At our resort we have the right to suspend lift privledges since it is written into the pass agreement, and that is the extent that most resorts ever go. If we want to "press charges" we need to call the police or sheriff's department and file a complaint - but they have to charge the offender. We have a county ordinance (Summit County Utah ordinance 110) which makes reckless skiing a misdemeanor.

In order to do what the article claims it would seem that the patrol would have to be given some sort of special police powers by the county. Maybe something similar to a Security Guard at the shopping mall? I don't know of any resort doing anything like this. If it is happening it would be interesting to know where and how.
post #10 of 15
Pinecone, I believe in Vail they have police officers on the slopes.
post #11 of 15
Here you go:

http://www.edirectory.co.uk/pf/pages...helmet&cid=880

Quote:
Originally Posted by English Article
"ski police,
I guess they mean ski patrollers. Do they have ski patrol of the same sort in Europe?

Quote:
sometimes wearing flashing blue helmets,
The reporter may be misrecalling something he saw in a drunken binge.

Quote:
have the power to chase,
Okay ... I guess. I think everyone has the power to chase other skiers.

Quote:
suspend,
Yeah, patrollers can pull tickets most every place I'm aware of.

Quote:
fine
Don't think so.

Quote:
and even press charges against reckless skiers
Anyone can go to the police (the real police) and "press charges." The trick is getting the police actually to do anything. Prosecutions for reckless skiing might be possible under some criminal statute: if nothing else, the general crime of reckless endangerment, which at least in one state, occurs when one creates "a substantial risk of death or serious physical injury to another person." Absent an actual and fairly serious accident, that would be a hard charge to make stick, and I'd be pretty surprised if it's even been prosecuted.
post #12 of 15
sj, they have ski police in the US...
http://archives.cnn.com/2001/CAREER/.../01/24/skicop/
post #13 of 15
If someone with a flashing blue helmet pulled me over skiing I do think I would be able to stand it would be so funny
post #14 of 15
I think we can all see the need for speed police...

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat
sj, they have ski police in the US...
http://archives.cnn.com/2001/CAREER/.../01/24/skicop/
Nice skis.
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