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Binding Riser plate: to use or not???

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Background on me:
  • 190lbs, 6', decent shape
  • Solid level 8 of 10, tend to be more aggressive skier, will ski pretty much anything, though my technique wouldn't win any awards.
  • Tend to ski fast, my friends all rip, and I either keep up or find a ride home at night
  • Spending more and more time off trail, though still in the learning process. Tend to get thrown around a lot in heavy broken up snow, balance needs some work. Hopefully the new skis will help.
Just purchased a pair of Mojo 90's (186cm) with the tyrolia (mojo15) binders.

Talking to people I am getting a very mixed response to whether or not I should mount these with a riser plate. Some are very much in favor others not. Some of my basic questions are, can I use one, if so which one, and should I use one?

Pros to using Riser plate (as I understand them):
  • Make it easier to get ski over on edge, not sure how big a deal this is?
  • Free flex patern
  • Facilitate adjusting binding forward and back for conditions
  • If I chose to sell ski, new owner doesn't have to remount bindings
Cons to using riser plate (as I understand them):
  • Weight
  • Cost
  • Feel, apparently surface mounting gives better feedback
  • Necessity, do I really need to adjust binding placement
Informed input appreciated, specifically the advantages and disadvantages of using a plate with this setup for true all-mountain use. Also if a plate is suggested which one, why?

thanks from the newbie...
post #2 of 17
I would recommend using the Tyrolia Carve Plate 13 SLR if you're going to go with a plate. Weight is negligible as is cost ($10-$30) - so scratch those from your cons list.

I greatly value the ability to remount without screwing around with the core of the ski again. The plate will improve the performance on groomers and have very little effect on deep snow days.

I'm not sure what you mean by "Free flex pattern". You may be referring to the ability of some plates to allow more of a free flexing binding mount, but honestly the binding really needs to be built to be free flexing to take advantage of a free flexing plate. A free flexing plates' main attribute is that they don't impede the free flexing of a free flex binding - they won't make a non-free flexing binding a free flexing one. Got it?

BTW - Mojo 15 bindings can be converted to be free flexing if you steal the heel track from a free flexing version of a Tyrolia binding (like the Cyber Carbon D9 or the Free Flex Plus versions).
post #3 of 17

Dom's Take on Lifters

Dom P. says:

"Merry Skiing & Happy New Snow for 2006 !
f#ck the risers. feel the snow.

dom"

I think he knows what he's talking about.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
LOL...Don't know Dom, but appreciate the input. I seem to be getting more and more input in this direction.

Thx to both of you.
post #5 of 17
He's a famous French skier and gave me that recommendation when I was asking his opinion on risers for my Stormriders.
post #6 of 17
I wouldn't get much of a plate if at all. I probably just stick with whatever separate lift plates that come with a "freeride" binding (Look Lifter, Marker Comp Free, etc.).

For that type ski, the primary skiing benefits of a plate, much less system, will not be noticed greatly. Also, unless you get a system that allows the binding to be quickly moved (i.e. like the Atomics), you're probably not going to take advantage of the subsequent option to remount the binding at a different location (given that you don't firmly believe now that you will).

The Mojo will carve decently but you're not buying a carving ski. Set it up 100% for off-piste. You'll still enjoy it enough on groomers.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
  • Feel, apparently surface mounting gives better feedback
Maybe at low edge angles. High edge angles I'd say the very opposite.

Adjusting the mount point forward or back could easily help you find some of that crud balance especially on a ski with a stiff forebody.

Quote:
  • 190lbs, 6', decent shape
  • Solid level 8 of 10, tend to be more aggressive skier, will ski pretty much anything, though my technique wouldn't win any awards.
  • Tend to ski fast, my friends all rip, and I either keep up or find a ride home at night
  • Spending more and more time off trail, though still in the learning process. Tend to get thrown around a lot in heavy broken up snow, balance needs some work. Hopefully the new skis will help.
Do a search on threads describing MarmotMB's technique.
post #8 of 17
I'm a strong believer in eliminating the flat spot created by the boot to binding interface - no matter what kind of skis you are riding. It just seems to me to be common sense that the rounder your skis can flex the better they are going to support a turn.

In that view I think lifters/risers/plates should be cast in a different light. Most "freeride" binding mounts do not eliminate this "dead" spot in the ski. It's old school thinking that says that a plate is going to change the ski feel since it really depends on the plate in question. My recommendation for the Tyrolia Carve Plate SLR is sound - it's really less like a traditional racing plate and more like a small free flexing lightweight lifter that doesn't change the flex pattern of the ski. I don't believe that 13mm of lift will have any negative impact on deep snow performance, but they will improve the ability to put wider skis over on edge.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
My recommendation for the Tyrolia Carve Plate SLR is sound - .
9 mm too.

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
I demo'd last years skis over new year, with run of the mill rental bindings that have what appeared to be about a 10mm plate. I was amazed how well a fairly wide ski like this handled the steep icy patches in the am/pm as well high speed run outs of the chutes at Lake Louise. Clearly I can attribute much of the stability to the length and stiffness of the ski, my fear is how much of the stability came from the additional leverage the riser plate gave me.

9mm looks like a really good compromise. Thanks guys!
post #11 of 17
comprex - yeah that's another option, but there are some key differences between the 9mm and the 13mm. The 13mm includes oblong holes and a "sliding" mount system so that the plate won't interfere with a free flexing binding. The 9mm also lacks the shock absorbing rubber layer that's on the 13mm.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tja111
I demo'd last years skis over new year, with run of the mill rental bindings that have what appeared to be about a 10mm plate. I was amazed how well a fairly wide ski like this handled the steep icy patches in the am/pm as well high speed run outs of the chutes at Lake Louise. Clearly I can attribute much of the stability to the length and stiffness of the ski, my fear is how much of the stability came from the additional leverage the riser plate gave me.

9mm looks like a really good compromise. Thanks guys!
If you don't want to go the eBay route for these plates then I recommend going to levelninesports.com to pick them up.
post #13 of 17
Was told that bump competitors don't use plates. Might be different now.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Noodler, one last question.

Where can I find technical information on my bindings and these plates. Tried tyrolia.com found nothing. If the 13mm plate that allows for a sliding mount system I am very interested. The shock absorbtion is less important.

Mounting the Mojo 15 binding on the 13mm plate, will I have a means to adjust the binding forward and aft without having to completely remove both toe/heel assemblies? (i.e. will this facilitate (any) easier adjustment to fore/aft positioning then the 9mm plate, which would not appear to offer any fore/aft adjustment capabilities).

Really appreciate the help but am really frustrated with the lack of information manufacturers produce on their products. I sell technology, if we managed our business the way these companies manage theirs, we would still be reading by candelight and sending smoke signals to communicate over long distances.

thanks again!
post #15 of 17
TJA

if you are interested I have a new set of Tyrolia 13 mm plates available.

PM me if interested
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
Alright, I know this is getting a little rediculous (thank you everyone for patience and input), so just in case I am going to put all my questions out for final clarification
  • Where can I find technical information on my bindings (tyrolia mojo 15) and these plates. I Tried tyrolia.com found nothing.
  • Would the Tyrolia Carve Plate 13 SLR allow me to adjust (specifically) the "Tyrolia Mojo 15" binding (out of box no modification to binder itself) fore/aft via some sort of sliding mechanism? Or is this functionality inherent to the binding type itself?
    • If I cannot slide, how would I adjust, remove the toe/heel assemblies from the plate and reposition?
    • How difficult is this (not worried about on slope), but can I accomplish this on my own in the shop? Special tools required? Any risdual effects of frequent repositioning etc?
  • Given my choice of binding, is there any other mechanical efficiency to using the 13mm plate vs 9mm plate?
    • Is one more stable, solid in terms of purchase to ski? Looks like one is screwed down vertically, while the other mounts in an oblong fasion?
    • If required to unmount/remount, is one easier then the other?
    • Shock absorbtion is of little consequence in my mind. 4mm of rubber is not really going to make that much difference.
  • What else am I missing
post #17 of 17
tja111 - I PM'd you my responses.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Binding Riser plate: to use or not???