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Fitness?????

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I normally don't spend much time in the fitness forum because I simply don't have time. But I thought I'd pass along this little story of self pity.

I thought I was fit. I ride my bike to work an average of 2 days a week (even in winter). It's a 17 mile ride each way. I feel like my lungs and heart are in decent shape. BUT..... Over the past two seasons I haven't skied much. Just about 20 days last year, with half of them being with my 4 year old, making wedge turns down a 300 yard long beginner hill. My first day this season was the same thing, a week and a half ago. Then, this past weekend, I went skiing by myself. 3 days later, I'm still sore from only a half day of bump skiing. I haven't hurt this much in... ever!

I don't work out with weights in the summer, so the only strength training I get is skiing. It's amazing how much power you can lose by not skiing. My bike riding times to work have slowed considerably, and I couldn't figure out why. Now I know. I'm riding slower in easier gears because I have no power. I thought I was just tired from lack of sleep (although that may still be part of it)

Not only do my quads, glutes, calves and hams hurt, but it also made my bad back start to rear it's ugly pain again.

This really sucks! Now I'm going to have to spend time doing strength training, and I don't have time. And when I do get some time, I'm too exhausted from tending to the triplets and their older sister. But I hate feeling this weak.

While skiing, I noticed that it made a big difference in my ability to navigate ugly conditions in the bumps and maintain proper balance when carving at speed. I just didn't have the energy because my legs were full of lactic acid and screaming at me.

GGRRRRR! I need to ski more!

/rant
post #2 of 18
The problem you describe is inevitable for every skier. Its a matter of when, not if. I hit the wall last year in Snowbird, it was a wake-up call for sure.

I've become a firm believer in strength training. I add rollerblading for fun. I'm also designing a well rounded fitness program with the help of a pro.

Fitness is a virtuous spiral. I work out to help me ski aggressively later in life while adding on several healthy years. One motivates the other.

I'm glad I regained my fitness while in my forties. I didn't wait until I couldn't do the activities I enjoy, like so many.

Cheers,

Michael
post #3 of 18
Hey Fatso,

We got room for a part time volunteer level 3 on our staff. Get back to real work instead of changing diapers and you'll get in shape quick.

or

Get a nanny. Train Frisco to take care of the kiddies, or better yet, take Frisco to work ON the bike. Get a bowflex, go to a gym with day care. Or don't. I'll be happy to kick your butt in the bumps next time you come back to Whitetail. Bitch gettin' old ain't it? Did you see Bing laughing at your ass as he was passing you on Exhibition? That really must have been embarassing getting passed by an 80 year old guy in the bumps. Let me know when you give up and are ready to start playing golf.
post #4 of 18
age is intolerant.

those midweek breaks from cardiovascular work aren't well tolerated if you want to charge it hard on the snow or on the bicycle.

my plan over the past 2 seasons has been to use short days in the beginning, and ramp up the ski day length as my skiing-related leg stamina increases. cycling doesn't help with the ski-specific stamina. I'm usually in bomber shape CV wise come December, but it always takes me about 4-5 ski days before I can be having fun at speed or in tougher conditions.
post #5 of 18
It's not only you John.

If I take more than 3 days off from shooting at least 50 arrows for archery, It takes me about a week to a week and a half to get enough stamina to shoot a full round of 100 arrows comfortably. Ah to be young again. Now it's a matter of being disiplined to keep it up..

DC
post #6 of 18
Fitness is the balance of strength, endurance, and flexibility that permits you function well in your particular environment. If you ski, you need more strength and less of the other two then if you do some other activities. And no you can't cheat the system. And yes age factors in to the equation.

However, you really should not need to do more than 15-20 minutes of strength training 3X per week to maintain baseline condition for all but true athletes. And strength training does not mean weight lifting. You can weight lift but as you age greater care must be taken to reduce lifting related injuries.

I now use only very small weights in my strength training. I prefer to use my own body weight using exercises that require me to develop balance and coordination.

No need to make this harder or more time consuming than you need to, but you do need to think out of the box.

Mark
post #7 of 18
The subject hits home for me. Fitness used to come easily without planning and effort, but recently, weight has gotten out of hand, and my lack of fitness affects my ability to ski severely. Recently I enrolled in a club so I can more routinely do strength and cardio training. Looks to be a long-term proposition, and I hope to have the will power to see it through.

John, you are a relatively young man, but raising those children will cause you to neglect your own needs. Since you obviously need to be healthy into your old age to support them you need to look after yourself now. Its a lot harder to catch up in a race than to stay even, or pull ahead.
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Did you see Bing laughing at your ass as he was passing you on Exhibition?
I HATE when that happens!

Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Get a nanny
Got one. That's why I at least don't have to get up for the 3am feedings

Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
take Frisco to work ON the bike
The gym bag on my bike rack weighs at least as much as my bike itself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Get a bowflex
I've got a decent weight bench in the basement. Motivating myself to use it is another story. I can't even motivate myself to do situps, and I know it'll make my back feel better.
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
John, you are a relatively young man, but raising those children will cause you to neglect your own needs. Since you obviously need to be healthy into your old age to support them you need to look after yourself now. Its a lot harder to catch up in a race than to stay even, or pull ahead.
based on what my friends now busy with fatherhood are showing me by way of example,

cirquerider is right on point here!
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider

John, you are a relatively young man, but raising those children will cause you to neglect your own needs. Since you obviously need to be healthy into your old age to support them you need to look after yourself now. Its a lot harder to catch up in a race than to stay even, or pull ahead.
Very true, and it's a lot harder for us women who give birth to and run after those kids, tending to THEIR needs for YEARS! :
post #11 of 18
I workout harder in the Fall and Winter then in the Spring and Fall.

There is no substitute for skiing.

Even if you are in great shape you will still feel it the first couple days out.

Especially if your form is sloppy like mine is for the first day or so.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
The subject hits home for me. Fitness used to come easily without planning and effort, but recently, weight has gotten out of hand, and my lack of fitness affects my ability to ski severely. Recently I enrolled in a club so I can more routinely do strength and cardio training. Looks to be a long-term proposition, and I hope to have the will power to see it through.

John, you are a relatively young man, but raising those children will cause you to neglect your own needs. Since you obviously need to be healthy into your old age to support them you need to look after yourself now. Its a lot harder to catch up in a race than to stay even, or pull ahead.
I'm not in bad shape. As I said, I bike to work a couple times a week, and it's not a short ride. I do the 17 mi at an average of about 18mph in the morning and about 19.5-20 mph in the afternoon. The issue is simply leg strength.

Last night I got motivated to clear out some of the woodworking stuff in the basement so that I have room to use the weights. I managed to do 2 sets of squats, doing 30 reps per set with about 75 lbs (60+ the bar). I just need the time and motivation to do about 6-8 sets plus 3 sets of 40 situps for my back.

I'm also not as young as I used to be. Turning 40 is gonna suck. But luckily Gill gets there first, so I get to dish out the ribbings before I get hammered with the same. Oh, I'm sorry Gill. You didn't want to keep that a secret, did you?
post #13 of 18
40! Old fart...







Opps. I'm past that myself!
post #14 of 18
I am in shape...round is a shape
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
40! Old fart...
I know. There's lots of people here that are a lot older than me (and a lot that are younger). I don't feel old, except that it takes longer to recover from working out or from injury, and to get to a certain level of strength or fitness.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I am in shape...round is a shape
This just totaly cracked me up. Real men have curves?
post #17 of 18
Alpine skiing is primarily an anaerobic activity. I noticed that when I consciously control my breathing when going down (extend - inhale, contract - exhale), I get a lot more mileage (well - footage) out of my legs.
post #18 of 18
I had a similar experience a few years ago. I used to be a regular runner and weight lifted in the fall to get ready for ski season. I had a nagging hip problem and stopped running for a while and then started to mtn bike. I went back to running only to injure my right knee and basically gave up running and started bike riding. Commuting to work, riding up monster ascents in the Cascades and doing 100 mile treks. So, I thought I was ready for the ski season. Man what a rude awakening! Since that experience 2 years ago I have started doing some short running works out, choosing to run on a HS track and instead of running miles, I run 400 and 800 meter sprint works out. It has made a huge difference in my skiing. Plus, I do a bit of strength training and ab workouts, which has helped with lower back soreness, especially after a day in the bumps. There's no substitute for a bit of weight training.
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