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what do your kids carry?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
About 26 yrs. ago a lady comes into the lounge at Fortress at 5:30 pm , the lifts have been closed for 1 1/2 hrs and it's dark , her son and another kid have not shown up , next thing all employees are shuttled to select locations with radios to do what we can . Unbelievable , the one kid had a hockey whistle in his pocket from the day before and was blowing the thing like crazy. They where on the top cat track on the backside , we could hear that thing on the front ridge ............both my daughters have always carried one because of that day long before they were born.
post #2 of 17
I like the whistle idea.

It'll be a while before I have to worry about my 7yo son going on the lift alone, even though he's been progressing quickly. But I might add the whistle to the checklist so it becomes a habit when we pack. No battery/reception to worry about a la radio, simple to use, etc. Thanks for sharing the info.
post #3 of 17
Usually the only thing my kids carry while on the slopes is my money.: I'm going to pack a whistle when we ski unknown areas but we usually have two way radios or cell phones. No guarentee of reception so a whistle would be a good backup.
post #4 of 17
a whistle sounds like a good idea for both my son and me.
post #5 of 17
Nice idea, thanks. We actually thought about it, but I believe the 4 year old would drive us insane on the trip up to the mountain.

Remember to teach the Morse Code for SOS
3 Short - 3 Long - 3 Short

For us, I put a radio in Janes pocket in case she gets away from me. How this would help is not important - for some reason it makes me feel better.
post #6 of 17
Whistle is a good idea. I have one in my back country pack and I have one for my son when we go hiking. I think I will have him carry it skiing too. We also carry radios and, if the mountain has a good signal, phones. We keep the radios off unless or until we get separated. This ensures that the batteries will be fully charged when needed and eliminates annoying radio chatter that bleeds through.
post #7 of 17
And remember, no metal whistles and it is best to use a solid body whistle. You know the ones without the pea inside. Make sure it is LOUD and that the kids can blow hard enough to make it work.

Here is a web site: http://www.basegear.com/signaling.html

And remember the whistle should be kept out of the weather when it is below freezing. It is all but useless if it is covered with ice and you may need to blow it on a moments notice. You may want to pair it with one of these :
http://ecom1.sno-ski.com/product163.html clipped to an inside pocket.

Mark
post #8 of 17
My kids have plastic whistles attached to ski coats as well as daypacks when hiking. They are under death threats to NEVER blow it in the tent or the car. Or for fun, even.
post #9 of 17
This year at Steamboat we gave our oldest a cell phone and told them to stay together. They could only call my cell phone and only answer if it was me calling. It worked out very well and we didn't have any problems.
post #10 of 17
If I had any they would carry a capital one card to keep those marauding hordes at bay. Then they could buy whistles.
post #11 of 17
post #12 of 17
I haven't seen (or heard) of those at all. The next thing I've read about coming here is GPS tracking on the cell phone where mom and dad (or paranoid lover) can keep tabs on where the cell phone is at all times.

Of course any of it only works where there is cell coverage which is often an issue on mountains here. The one Leeroy mentions still has zero coverage but also hasn't opened yet this year as originally planned.

edit just realized the link within the article you linked refers to the GPS tracking phone. My first tumor is a cute reference, wonder if their mareketing department will use it.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by janesdad
...

Remember to teach the Morse Code for SOS
3 Short - 3 Long - 3 Short
Too complicated - Repeating 3 is the international signal for emergency. So, just teach them to do to 3 blasts wait and repeat.

I have skied w/ a whistle for over 30 years. Since my dad had us carry them when we were kids. Even in familiar terrain or skiing trails only back EC. In the East, if the fall takes you off the trail, patrol would probably miss you in a sweep. You can lose you voice in as little as 10-15 minutes of continuous yelling.

Edit: Fox whistle is a good whistle. It is small and very loud. It is the whistle I use when river guiding.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by StormDay
Too complicated - Repeating 3 is the international signal for emergency. So, just teach them to do to 3 blasts wait and repeat.

I have skied w/ a whistle for over 30 years. Since my dad had us carry them when we were kids. Even in familiar terrain or skiing trails only back EC. In the East, if the fall takes you off the trail, patrol would probably miss you in a sweep. You can lose you voice in as little as 10-15 minutes of continuous yelling.

Edit: Fox whistle is a good whistle. It is small and very loud. It is the whistle I use when river guiding.
This one I will print and keep, forever, and pass it on to my son. I had never thought about the whistle, being lost thing, but pretty soon he'll ski on his own, so make it a habit early.

THANKS all for super, possibly life-saving advice.
post #15 of 17
We could market a "Slope Alone" kiddie kit! The Macaluy Caulkin (sp.),version comes with:

A US Coast Guard approved flare gun.

Bear spray .. not for Barking Bears .. pepper spray for the real ones.

A high voltage tazer ... if any adult that ain't yer' mommy or ski patrol comes within 20 feet, zap em'.

Canned air horns of at least 100 db with a range of 10 miles.
post #16 of 17
Since my daughter is still a few years from skiing on her own (and even more years for skiing on her own on vacation, since we live in the mid atlantic), I hadn't thought about this kind of stuff yet, but I really appreciate the info.

What else do you have your kids carry? Food (powerbar, or something else)? water or juice box or some other form of hydration? Glock 9 (you know, for bears and mountain lions )? Flare gun?
post #17 of 17
With three (10, 7, &5) kids on the hill (never alone) I am looking for ideas on how to keep them safe so we can all enjoy the ski trips. There is the safety thing and the communication thing.

I like the whistle idea...inexpensive, small, easy to operate

We got a free second phone with my last phone purchase (Sprint) and it allows you to program it to call or receive calls from programed numbers only. Load them in speed dial and you have something even my five yr old could handle. Have not tried the two way radio yet.

There are some interesting GPS styled items out there
too.

http://www.brickhousesecurity.com/child-locators-personal-gps-tracking-device.html?engine=overture!4819&keyword=child+saf ety+alarm

Getting seperated, then getting hurt. Either of these things can happen in seconds. This does not even take into account any criminal element.
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