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experienced easterner looking for a pow tip or two... no real pow experience here!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi all, I'm a newbie on here, and have a quick question for as many of you as want to help me out. I ski in MASH (Mid Atlantic Ski Hell) and am extremely proficient in all our crap conditions, but am heading to Utah in 3 days and CO in early March for my first pow experience (I hope, snow willing). Rather than be my ego-driven self and just trying to learn on my own, and outside the lesson I have scheduled, are there any quick tips I should keep in mind for the powder? When we get a lot of snow here, it's always heavy, so i'm sure it's not the same! Any help is much appreciated! Again, at this point I think Pow is the only condition I really haven't seen yet! Thanks in advance, I look forward to some quick tips! And yes, it's taken 28 years to make enough money to be able to come out there! LOL!
post #2 of 15
This comes up here regularly; the most recent discussion we've had is at:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...ghlight=powder

And that contains links to earlier discussions, etc. That should be more then enough to get you started.
post #3 of 15
My way...
1) Rent fat, soft skis, or fat-tip & tail, narrow wasted skis (better on the pack than fatties).
2) Use boot adjustments to soften you boots, loosen the top buckle and power strap. (Soft boots & soft skis for soft snow.)
3) Visualize an airplane banking in a turn. Visualize your two feet together banking in a turn inside the snow. You bank (edge), not steer, to turn in powder. You don't bank your body, you counter the body while the feet bank around the turn.
4) Both feet close together, equal weight on both feet.
5) Weight centered in the middle of the ski; don't pressure the tips and don't sit back.
6) To turn, reach way downhill with your pole and make a blocking pole plant. At the same time, strongly tilt the downhill foot to the little toe edge and move the hips across the skis as you cross the fall line. Keep the good "comma" position, hips toward the hill and shoulders down the hill. Keep hands in good position, not high nor (uphill hand) low, and reach way downhill early with the hand making the next pole plant.
7) Find the tempo the snow will let you turn. Don't try to force fast turns.
8) You don't need to ski fast if you ski correctly.
9) Edge both feet for the new turn before you reach the fall line.
10) Finish your turns as far uphill as you need to control your speed. Control the radius of your turns by the amount you angulate your body and tilt your skis.

Or...
1) Jump high,
2) ski fast,
3) push your skis around to turn,
4) wear yourself out.


Ken
post #4 of 15
SPEED SPEED SPEED is key. Go fast have fun. Hoot. Hollar. While carrying a bunch of, you guessed it' SPEEEED.
post #5 of 15
I had a really good east coast skier show up for my powder class, at the end of the afternoon, he was able to link at least 10-15 (really good) turns before biting it. The main problem he had was timing, he was relaxing his legs a little too early in the turn, the skis would decamber & stop turning. I had him work on extending longer into the turn, the skis would continue to bend and continue to deflect & turn. This also had the effect of slowing down his rhythm. So my tip is: let the pressure of the snow build up under your feet by keep your legs long longer and your turns will be effortless. Note in lighter snow or with stiffer ski, you will need to go faster in order to create enough pressure to bend the skis.
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help, I'm hitting it with my Fischer RX6's, I can't justify paying more for renting a pair of B2's per day than what I'm paying for my rental car, and I want to be able to ski with what I got so when I hit CO in March I'm on my game. The RX6 is a stiffer all-mountain ski that is pretty wide at the tip and in the back, but is only a 68 waist. Regardless, I'm sure I'll have a blast biting it until I pick it up! Anything else to remember? Hopefully I'll be blessed with a dump or two, it seems like that's pretty common out there! I'm absolutely geeked!
post #7 of 15
Redgabe,
Hundenmaster has good information. Also, go to powder help thread, some more good information there, you don't need to think of 10 things while you are turning, although the 10 items are correct, think of no more than 2.

RW
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by HundenMaster
I had a really good east coast skier show up for my powder class, at the end of the afternoon, he was able to link at least 10-15 (really good) turns before biting it. The main problem he had was timing, he was relaxing his legs a little too early in the turn, the skis would decamber & stop turning. I had him work on extending longer into the turn, the skis would continue to bend and continue to deflect & turn. This also had the effect of slowing down his rhythm. So my tip is: let the pressure of the snow build up under your feet by keep your legs long longer and your turns will be effortless. Note in lighter snow or with stiffer ski, you will need to go faster in order to create enough pressure to bend the skis.
Wasnt that good of skier if he couldnt tear up the pow! Good technique if you have it already will carry over to powder. A few minor modifications here and there.
Speed is your friend in the pow. It makes it easier to turn as you plane out on top of the snow. Practice Practice Practice. Time on the snow is your best friend!
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hey ya'll thanks for the tips... skiied 4 of 6 day so far and 2 have been freshie days, Brighton had some nice tucked away stuff off Great Western! I'm learning fast and trying out as much as I can to see what is working for me, and pretty much you guys and the thread on the post are spot on. Today is a rest day (even though they got 5 inches+) but it's supposed to snow more today and tonight for 8-14 in the Cottonwoods, so I'll be back at it tomorrow bright and early! Thanks again, my only powder fall so far involved an "Ostrich-like" head-first into about 2 1/2 feet at Alta. I was laughing the whole time! My head was the only part of me under the snow! ::
post #10 of 15
Believe it or not its snowing in Pittsburgh today. Believe me its not going to amount to much but at least its not rain.

Soft Snow Guy covered the bases very well. Here's a tip I have used with some people and they have remarked it worked well for them. I got it off Harald Harb's site.

Imagine squeezing a small nerf ball or glove between your knees and your ski boots. This creates a platform with both your skis weighted pretty evenly. I like to feel a little up down motion, almost like standing and bouncing pretty lightly on a trampoline. Face down the fall line and use some rotary foot steering to guide your skis form one turn to the next. I try to think about keeping my knees over my toe pieces avoiding getting pushed back. All kinds of ways to do that, retract your feet back under your hips. Staying in the fall line more versus coming way across the hill can also make it easier to change directions. Have a blast.

Smile and have a blast.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
I got it off Harald Harb's site.

....Face down the fall line and use some rotary foot steering to guide your skis form one turn to the next. .

: surely not!
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
16+ inches at Brighton this morning! Got my game on, thanks again for the tips! I was in snow up to my balls! LOL What a blast! Best day of skiing I've ever had!! Thank you, UTAH!!! Now I know what an EPIC Powder day is!
post #13 of 15
Sorry Disski for the rotary suggestion after referencing Harb and the glove or nerf ball squeezing tip. Harb of course is the King of pure carves under any circumstances.The up down rotary suggestion is my half as- powder technique. Give me some credit though, I didn't tell him to raise his inside arm a la Lito when skiing wet heavy snow to get the skis to come up and out of the glop.

Speaking of powder I'm about to go AWOL to go ski some. The weather has been so lousy here.
post #14 of 15
Powder to balls = chest height on me! :

can I change my mind about ESA please? ..... or does anyone know where to hire a small steamroller?
post #15 of 15
who suggested narrow waisted skis? A ski with too much sidecut is hell in powder. They sink, wobble, wiggle and twitch. They are really rotten. A ski with less sidecut,and nice fat waists is way more fun than a turny ski.

Powder is easy, I don't know what the big deal is. I take all my people into it, even beginners. If you do it right, it's the least technical snow around.

Key is ski the first part of the turn in slow motion. Once you're turning, you can play with the turn but the start is key. Start soft and gentle.

The other key thing is to KEEP turning. Keep moving.

Oh, and the third key thing is, ski the bloody stuff. The only way to learn powder is by doing it, and feeling it.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › experienced easterner looking for a pow tip or two... no real pow experience here!