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Corbet's Open... - Page 6

post #151 of 231
 Corbets is not currently open.  I skied over and looked in yesterday and it still seems thin to me with several rocks in the chute that I'm not used to seeing.  Also the drop looks a little extra large.
post #152 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by gfabbri View Post

Shamelessly resurrecting this classc thread with my own anecdotes from my first trip to JH last year... First day: wanted to check it out, so convinced my partner for the day to accompany me past all the orange poles... I made it about 10 feet from the deserted edge, and got a little freaked my the abyss ahead in the day's white-out conditions. So, in true gaper style, I unclicked and did a commando crawl up to the edge. I couldn't see squat except nasty rocks too close to either side, with nothingness ahead. Then a dude with wiiide twintips and a pack skis up, pauses for a second, and drops -- just vanishes. I didn't hear him land or see him ski out, but my bud caught a glimpse of the skier ripping it down by the infield... At this point, I was pretty freaked by the run, but had a great few days all over the rest of the mountain. Last day: My first tram up, we approach Corbet's. All of a sudden, the entire tram goes "OOOOOHHHH," then "WHOOAAAA," as a blue streak comes rocketing down Corbet's on his back, head first, at Mach 3, all his equipment scattered all over the hill. He nailed one of the indicator rocks way down the chute and kept sliding. Tram op declared it among the two or three worst crashes he's seen on Corbet's. At this point, I completely gave up any illusion of skiing it that trip. Yet still, I'm kind of obsessed and would love to drop it, at least once... I just can't get it out of my mind...

Nice Bump.

Tetonpowderjunkie, keep the updates coming.
post #153 of 231
Hey guys new guy here. Heading out to Jackson Hole From Feb. 13-22 and I can't wait. It will be my first time skiing at JH and to say that I have been obsessing at trying corbetts is an understatement. I really hope it opens up while I am there. It has been awesome reading about everyones experiences skiing it and I cant wait. I look at the picture of my dad skiing it in the 80's and think how great an experience it would be. From what I have read it seems like the Couloir is the ultimate test of mental strength. With the recent snowfall Im hoping that it will open up by the time I get there. Keep the updates coming!

Snap10
post #154 of 231
I believe it was just opened while I was there last week.  I wanted to at least peer over the edge of it, but every tram ride I took was in white-out conditions at the top so I didnt get my chance.  I doubt I would ever ski it myself unless it was one of those high-snow situations...

Quote:
Originally Posted by snap10 View Post

Hey guys new guy here. Heading out to Jackson Hole From Feb. 13-22 and I can't wait. It will be my first time skiing at JH and to say that I have been obsessing at trying corbetts is an understatement. I really hope it opens up while I am there. It has been awesome reading about everyones experiences skiing it and I cant wait. I look at the picture of my dad skiing it in the 80's and think how great an experience it would be. From what I have read it seems like the Couloir is the ultimate test of mental strength. With the recent snowfall Im hoping that it will open up by the time I get there. Keep the updates coming!

Snap10
 
post #155 of 231


I thought that looked familiar...nearly the same spot almost 20 years ago:

post #156 of 231
you can see that the trees are the same pattern and therefore the snow depth must be similar for the two shots. nice.
post #157 of 231

Corbets is way more serious than Saudan's.  Many years ago, my then-11-year-old son (now a software engineer and former ski instructor) and I skied Saudan's.  Meanwhile, my wife and daughter watched from the top, a woman next to them wondering out loud, "Who would let their child ski something like that?"  Then, according to my wife, my daughter's eyes got very, very big.  Not too far below the top my son hit a patch of black ice and cartwheeled head over heels, over, and over, and over, until finally some saint standing on the halfway ledge sacrificed himself by tackling him in midair.  My son and I then skied to the bottom, at which point he broke down crying, the only time I've ever seen him cry.


Edited by raspritz - 1/29/10 at 8:13am
post #158 of 231
 Corbets was still not open two days ago when I went over to look at it.
post #159 of 231
I wish it was!  Hope it is at least 1 day between the 6-13 of Feb! :)
post #160 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

 Corbets was still not open two days ago when I went over to look at it.

Then I must have been mistaken.  I thought Ben told me it was open.

Sorry 'bout that!
post #161 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by raspritz View Post

Corbets is way more serious than Saudan's.  Many years ago, my then-11-year-old son (now a software engineer and former ski instructor) and I skied Saudan's.  Meanwhile, my wife and daughter watched from the top, a woman next to them wondering out loud, "Who would let their child ski something like that?"  Then, according to my wife, my daughter's eyes got very, very big.  Not too far below the top my son hit a patch of black ice and cartwheeled head over heels, over, and over, and over, until finally some saint standing on the halfway ledge sacrificed himself by tackling him in midair.  My son and I then skied to the bottom, at which point he broke down crying, the only time I've ever seen him cry.



would it interest you to expand the meaning of your son's fall by addressing parents whose ego (and apparent poor judgement about conditions) demands performance from their children that is beyond fun or reason?

Kids are happy to share with their friends stories of jumping some rock, hitting some jump, or nailing some line in front of the classmates or girls. They don't need to ski the no fall zone in icy conditions, someone else needs that.

I see it all the time and I deplore and totally disrespect it, and it's a crappy way to teach skiing anyway, and the ends do not justify the means.    
post #162 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post





would it interest you to expand the meaning of your son's fall by addressing parents whose ego (and apparent poor judgement about conditions) demands performance from their children that is beyond fun or reason?

Kids are happy to share with their friends stories of jumping some rock, hitting some jump, or nailing some line in front of the classmates or girls. They don't need to ski the no fall zone in icy conditions, someone else needs that.

I see it all the time and I deplore and totally disrespect it, and it's a crappy way to teach skiing anyway, and the ends do not justify the means.    


I love Monday morning quarterbacks...they are the best.
post #163 of 231
No, if you played in the game Sunday, raised young boys and taught them to ski, and share the mountains with lots of young kids, you can comment on personal experiences, teaching techniques, like and dislikes, O-kay with you?.

got anything to say, or just being snide this not after football monday?

Whenever I skiing with the little ones on the hill, I give them major stoke, and they love it, unconditionally.
post #164 of 231
Dear Davluri,

Possibly you might be more judgmental that is warranted given that you know nothing about me, my background or experience, my son, his background or experience (either before the incident of after), or about our reflection and thinking about that day over the following 20 years.  Far from my pushing my son, I rather doubt that I could have prevented him from skiing Saudan's that day.  I'm also delighted that, given the rarified level of skiing he has since achieved, he is still happy to have me tag along after him if I can.  I suspect he'll chuckle over your comments when I show them to him this evening.
post #165 of 231
Thread Starter 
Davluri:

This is one of those impossible-to-call situations.  I also see lots of situations where parents push their offspring (or spouses push spouses, boyfriends/girlfriends, etc etc) to do something that may or may not be beyond their skill level.  When it works, it can be a life-changing experience for the person who got pushed.  It can help that person make enormous strides not only in the sport but also in life itself.

When it DOESN'T work, it's very easy for any onlooker to say "Well, that was obviously a really bad idea.  What was that moron thinking?"

I've been in the "pushed" category lots of times in the years I've skied.  Luckily, none of them killed me but several of them scared the crap out of me at the time. 

During the years that I was a backcountry guide here in Jackson, there were several times I pushed people beyond what *they* thought they could do but I felt was well within their skills.  If any of those had gone bad, I'd have been on the receiving end of the same kind of judgements you're making.  None of them did go bad, but that may have been luck as much as anything else.  I would prefer to think that raspritz knew his son's capabilities and felt confident he could do the couloir.  Something went wrong, but that doesn't NECESSARILY mean it was a bad decision.

And just for the record going back to the original point of the thread...

As of 1-29-10, Corbet's Couloir is closed and has not been open to the public yet this winter.  It appears to have definitely been poached a few times, but it's not open.  I would say it needs at least another storm of last week's magnitude to cover up the Indicator Rocks that are still exposed right in the slide line if somebody were to fall on entering the couloir.
post #166 of 231
Kids several years younger than 11 have skied Corbet's, and had fun doing it.  Good on'ya, raspritz, for being a cool dad who let his son test himself.

The cool thing about the internet is hearing things like raspritz' story, or several of Bob Peters' Corbet's stories for that matter, like the husband who couldn't handle his wife skiing it.  (It may even be in this thread for all I know.)  
post #167 of 231
A small, but growing part of me kind of hopes that it will be closed on the day should I ever make it to JH.  That would spare the embarrassment of chickening out or the pain of eating it after the drop.  I have little doubt that I would have done it if challenged 20 years ago.  Today, I'm not so confident
post #168 of 231
CGil, easy on yourself, and no need to rationalize.


So open or closed, it's all your call.

but you're thinking you will feel compelled, no matter what.

Then pick great conditions and enjoy.
 
Edited by davluri - 1/29/10 at 7:46pm
post #169 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

C...


So open or closed, it's all your call.
....



 

For the sports fans out there, actually, if it's closed, please don't...this just in:  it may be closed for a reason.

My personal fave here is the Dutch guy who tried to hip-check the drop while it was closed due to thin cover...good times.  The poaching threads on here sound cool but blow in the real world. 

Anyway, there are lots of other drops so there's lots to hit there ranging from always-good side hits on up.   Some of the side hits could be good starters anyway.
post #170 of 231
my bad writing. I just meant he didn't have to hope it was closed to save face. He could reject skiing it even  if it was open, cause, it's all about him, his call. sorry. not advocating poaching.
post #171 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

my bad writing. I just meant he didn't have to hope it was closed to save face. He could reject skiing it even  if it was open, cause, it's all about him, his call. sorry. not advocating poaching.

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/89566/poach-of-the-year

This thread may have been started while you were sleep-walking.  Again, the online soul-brah thing has its place but trying to make poaching among other things sound cool is not one of them.
post #172 of 231
Of course he was crying.  You would be crying too if you had just blown your shot at the much-hyped-up run, and KNEW that you would likely have to leave home before getting another shot at it; I'm sure MOM would never allow him to try it again.

My kids need not fear that; Mom stays home.

Well done raspritz; it's Dad's job to compensate for over-protective Mom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raspritz View Post

Corbets is way more serious than Saudan's.  Many years ago, my then-11-year-old son (now a software engineer and former ski instructor) and I skied Saudan's.  Meanwhile, my wife and daughter watched from the top, a woman next to them wondering out loud, "Who would let their child ski something like that?"  Then, according to my wife, my daughter's eyes got very, very big.  Not too far below the top my son hit a patch of black ice and cartwheeled head over heels, over, and over, and over, until finally some saint standing on the halfway ledge sacrificed himself by tackling him in midair.  My son and I then skied to the bottom, at which point he broke down crying, the only time I've ever seen him cry.

post #173 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Of course he was crying.  You would be crying too if you had just blown your shot at the much-hyped-up run, and KNEW that you would likely have to leave home before getting another shot at it; I'm sure MOM would never allow him to try it again.

My kids need not fear that; Mom stays home.

Well done raspritz; it's Dad's job to compensate for over-protective Mom.

 



 


The only protection I ever offered my 10 year old was to understand the conditions for him. With 20 years in those chutes, I can help him there.  Never did he have to ski over ice or rocks when tackling vertical drop in chutes at 9 or 10 years old. That's all. His confidence built from absolutely nailing lines that most 25 or 45 year olds wet their pants just looking into. So you'd be off to say I was overprotective or a hindrance to my son's progress on tough lines. He's now a very respected steep line skier, and didn't need to learn from trauma or mistakes at an early age.  

Judgemental of some parents, yeah, probably too much, but I'm projecting from all the bad parental behavior I have witnessed. You are unknown to me, and may exemplify the very best of parental guidance and support (way back when).
post #174 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post




http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/89566/poach-of-the-year

This thread may have been started while you were sleep-walking.  Again, the online soul-brah thing has its place but trying to make poaching among other things sound cool is not one of them.

 

easy with the sarcasm, your point is clear and fully supported here and on the slope. Poachers, 99 % of the time, look like flaky dorks, ducking a rope to ski 5 yards into closed terrain. Lame. agreed. Major poaches usually a horrible idea. But there are moments when the conditions, the skiers, and the line just merge into something wonderful and beautiful. sorry, we'll have to agree to disagree.

and that thread made an attempt to talk about restrictions to the poaching practice as well.

it's sounding a little like the fight crime in the streets idea. who could agrue against that?
post #175 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post




For the sports fans out there, actually, if it's closed, please don't...this just in:  it may be closed for a reason.

My personal fave here is the Dutch guy who tried to hip-check the drop while it was closed due to thin cover...good times.  The poaching threads on here sound cool but blow in the real world. 

Anyway, there are lots of other drops so there's lots to hit there ranging from always-good side hits on up.   Some of the side hits could be good starters anyway.

 


What's a side hit. Hope it's not a traverse entered line! Traversing (like under the chute photo posted) may be more criminal, in the real world, than poaching.
post #176 of 231
Just for the record, Davluri, I was talking about razpritz, and Dad's and Moms in general.  I made no comment about you.  Me?  I'm probably on the under-protective side, but my kids seem to have been able to survive without injury.  Maybe that's because they are and were smart enough to avoid doing stupid stuff. 
post #177 of 231
It's all good.  I totally understand it's an issue with many aspects.

Ultimately it is of course a parents decision, and there are many, many good decisions, and not all the same.
post #178 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post





What's a side hit. Hope it's not a traverse entered line! Traversing (like under the chute photo posted) may be more criminal, in the real world, than poaching.

Dude, in the real world, a side hit is a pretty well-known thing.  Particularly for hardcore bro-brahs, like the persona you are trying to be. 

Ski more, get some more experience, and until then just know that from time to time the idiocy of your posts may get pointed out.
post #179 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post




Dude, in the real world, a side hit is a pretty well-known thing.  Particularly for hardcore bro-brahs, like the persona you are trying to be. 

Ski more, get some more experience, and until then just know that from time to time the idiocy of your posts may get pointed out.
 

Shees, a little bit of hostility there? Calm down guys...
post #180 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post





The only protection I ever offered my 10 year old was to understand the conditions for him. With 20 years in those chutes, I can help him there.  Never did he have to ski over ice or rocks when tackling vertical drop in chutes at 9 or 10 years old. That's all. His confidence built from absolutely nailing lines that most 25 or 45 year olds wet their pants just looking into. So you'd be off to say I was overprotective or a hindrance to my son's progress on tough lines. He's now a very respected steep line skier, and didn't need to learn from trauma or mistakes at an early age.  

Judgemental of some parents, yeah, probably too much, but I'm projecting from all the bad parental behavior I have witnessed. You are unknown to me, and may exemplify the very best of parental guidance and support (way back when).

Dear Sir,

I responded to your original, rather negatively ad hominem post with civility.  Insofar as you know nothing about me, my son, or the circumstances, your comments ring sanctimonious and condescending. The only "bad behavior" I have witnessed here is yours.
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