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New Ski Boots - Pack out time

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I bought a pair of Salomon X-wave 8.0 Free ski boots back in November and have since skied in them 7 times - most of the time going 3-5 hours. It's been quite a painful experience and I've had parts of my boots blown out a bit... but I still seem to be having slight problems with comfort.

My question is how long it takes for liners to pack out... because if I wear my boots w/o my socks on (not skiing of course), they're fine.... but when I have thin socks on, my last 3 toes go numb from poor circulation.

Should I just wait for the pack out? Because I can't pinpoint the exact location to blow out the boot. Also, after skiing for about an hour, my toes are numb but there's no more pain in the front part of my feet.

Thanks!
post #2 of 19
get the boot boards ground down a bit thinner (1-2mm) should give you the instep room for socks.

or thin the footbeds

or cut a slit in the elestic over the instep.

after 7days 4 hours/day should be 90% done packout
post #3 of 19
Did the boots ever fit right in the shop?
post #4 of 19
sixth toe..i wore my kryptons for about 15 hours at home and it took about 10 days to break in... then had the sixth toe blown out a little on both feet...except for the fact my liners started to come apart they where broken in
post #5 of 19
Any place where there seems to be more pressure? (top of the foot, pinching in the heel) etc

Are you sure the numbness comes from circulation and not nerve compression?

Do you have custom or supportive footbeds or just the stocks?

What size street shoe and what size shell? did you get shell sized?
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonpole
... because if I wear my boots w/o my socks on (not skiing of course), they're fine.... Thanks!
I wear my X-max 10s without socks (skiing), and they're fine too. I would get them blown out a little more if I were you.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
Any place where there seems to be more pressure? (top of the foot, pinching in the heel) etc

Are you sure the numbness comes from circulation and not nerve compression?

Do you have custom or supportive footbeds or just the stocks?

What size street shoe and what size shell? did you get shell sized?
I'm in an 11.5 US street shoe size.. in a 27.5 Mondo sized boot. My foot measured on the scale is around 27.5.. slightly less than it. Shell fit was said to be okay by the bootfitter. Using custom footbeds. Not sure if it's a nerve or circulation problem.. it could be either. All I can tell is that my toes are numb ... and not from cold.

Ski boots have to be by far the hardest thing to fit = (
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion
get the boot boards ground down a bit thinner (1-2mm) should give you the instep room for socks.

or thin the footbeds

or cut a slit in the elestic over the instep.

after 7days 4 hours/day should be 90% done packout
The boot board is the piece of plastic inside the boot that's removeable - locked into the boot under the liner right?... By grinding it down, that lowers my foot in the shell and the lower I go, the more room there's supposed to be, right?.. I'll go give it a shot next week at my bootfitter. Thanks.
post #9 of 19
hmm thats funny
I have the same problem with the same boot same size.
Im pretty sure my smaller 3 toes are just getting too cold cause I dont have that problem when i wore them around the house for break-in.
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Indoors: With socks on, my right foot has the last 3 toes numbing, but no pain. Without socks, both feet are fine.

Outdoors skiing: First hour - Feel like jumping out of my boots for both feet and feels like something in the toebox is wrong. Second Hour - toes are numb and it feels fine... (probably because the toes are numb!)

Currently testing: Removed boot board (to simulate having the boot board grind down to flush) and seeing if my right foot still has the same problem indoors. If it doesn't, I'd say grinding it down would be the perfect solution (I hope!).

Note to add: I've never been able to "wiggle" my toes in the boots. Also, I'm already at the loosest setting for buckles.
post #11 of 19
Caveat - I'm not a bootfitter, but here's some advice on boot fit from someone who's been skiing for 30 years.

The main key to a good fitting boot is heel hold down in my opinion. This comes from a combination of a good fit around the ankle and achilles and the correct volume over the instep. The toes MUST have wiggle room or they will be cold. Many skiers down size their boots to improve the fit in ankle and instep areas and then just punch out for the toes.

I'm a strong proponent for metatarsal support in the footbed. This will relieve toe numbness in many cases. When feet are held tightly in a ski boot (as opposed to street shoes) the metatarsal area will collapse and cause problems for some people (I'm one of them). Not only does a good footbed reduce the overall length of your foot (due to the increased arch support), but it can provide better support for your forefoot (through some kind of built-in metatarsal pad) and alleviate toe pain.

Bootboard grinding can help fine tune the fit in the instep area (increasing the available volume) and it can reposition the heel and achilles into a better position on the spine of the boot. I've used this technique to solve both problems.

I believe that being as educated as possible on what a good boot fit is and how it can be achieved will help you work with a boot fitter much better. It should be clear if your boot fitter is knowledgeable if you yourself understand what you're trying to achieve.

BTW - I should also point out that one must distinguish between true "boot induced" pain and pain due to muscle weakness or fatigue in your foot. If you can wear your ski boots around the house (tightened down as they would be for skiing) without any pain for hours, but you are experiencing pain on the slope then there's a good chance it's just due to weakness of the muscles in your foot. I experience this at the beginning of every season and sometimes when I haven't skied in 2 weeks. Once your feet are stronger your boots should feel totally dialed-in on the slopes just like they do when you're romping around the house.
post #12 of 19
How thick are your socks? I had a pair of Nordicas years ago that I used to wear a pair of black silk dress socks with. If you are using thick socks try going thinner, if you are using thin socks now and don't want to go "commando" and don't want to mess with the boots, try a pair of real thin dress socks. Won't do much for foot warmth, but makes a boot fit good.
post #13 of 19
Something new I discovered last night as i was trying on new boots (for the thrid day in a row , I found that I could identify exaclty where the boots were pinching, crushing, generally mashing my feet to exact points by wearing the boots for a while without ANY buckles or straps done up at all.....try it out.
post #14 of 19
I use ultra-thin socks (usually called "liners") that just make it a bit easier to slide my feet in and give a touch of insulation (most of them are Outlast, which seems to help, too).
post #15 of 19

Well said!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
The main key to a good fitting boot is heel hold down in my opinion. This comes from a combination of a good fit around the ankle and achilles and the correct volume over the instep. The toes MUST have wiggle room or they will be cold. Many skiers down size their boots to improve the fit in ankle and instep areas and then just punch out for the toes.
This is a very astute observation. Worth focused attention for those wanting to get the most from their boots!
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonpole
The boot board is the piece of plastic inside the boot that's removeable - locked into the boot under the liner right?... By grinding it down, that lowers my foot in the shell and the lower I go, the more room there's supposed to be, right?.. I'll go give it a shot next week at my bootfitter. Thanks.

right

right

as others have said can you find a thinner sock.
rest sounds right
post #17 of 19
Where are your toes going numb. Top, Bottom whole toe?

Metatarsal arch area could be suspect and also the area below the nevicular (medial side of foot slightly forward and below ankle bone) if the bottom of your toes are numb. I assume it is your little toe and the 2 toes up from it that are numb on the bottom.

i experienced this in my new boots last weekend (1st day on them) last 3 toes on right foot completely numb on the bottom. But i was able to ski all day in them the 1st day out with little or no ache or pain. A tribute to the bootfitter considering my fat foot rigid foot with fairly high arch & instep, skinny heel and birdlike lower leg in a Head RD96 plug with booster strap!

I went and had new non-posted conformable custom pro beds made. I was in an old surefoot made for 2 pair prior to my current boot. they were too short and didn't have enough support. I won't really know about the numbness until I ski again Sunday, but these beds feel great!

You can check out this bed at www.sidas.com
post #18 of 19
thinest you can get and i wore were womens knee highs...worked great:
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for everyone's input. I really appreciate the extra knowledge before talking to my bootfitter.

Bootfitter: "You have killer wide feet"
Me: "Are my feet really that wide?"
Bootfitter: "They're like boats"

Expanded toebox by a lot.. felt great skiing them today.. no pain at all. Thanks again!
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