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Getting over the fear of pitch - Page 3

post #61 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikewil
Steve. I would also add focus on the intensity of the steering action-get them around and back across the fall line pronto.
This is part of what I did on that Liberty run, for sure. Question, though: don't you think that at the extreme limits of "getting around", recreational skiers often resort to big rotary movements (upper-body) that can sabotage what we're trying to do, here? In your case, you were able to show them what intensity of steering action is beforehand, and I think that's key. So, this is increasing the intensity while maintaining some of that patience--and that's where it can get tough.
post #62 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
My skis are tuned, sharp, waxed, etc. The stuff I am scared of, and fall on, are difficult to change direction on without falling down. I need to keep doing them, trying different techniques, as obviously I haven't got a good 'ice technique' yet.

I'm even ugly on the steeps in hero snow!

Go at night? Therein lies the problem. Here's my typical skiing experience.

We mostly ski at night. It's had all day to soften up and be great, then we arrive about the time everyone's scraped the good stuff off, the ice is showing through in spotty arrangements, the piles are starting to harden up again due to the 36 degree day in the sun and now it's 25 (freeze, thaw, freeze, thaw), and it's Chunky Monkey skiing in dim light.

I'll be skiing along on the blues, edging for what's good under me, then SCRAAAAAAPE, ice for 10 feet, then hit a thick 6 inch pile of frozen crud, then nothing but something snowy and edgable.....it's a potpourri that needs constant adjustment because you can't see what you're getting but you can feel it when you're tossed around. While I get a little nervous in this, it's What's On The Menu. (thanks, nolo!)

Going onto steeper stuff, it's more of that, only I can barely seem to even stand on the side of the hill without some downward movement. Even a tiny release of edges (while standing across the fall line) sends me down quickly and I'm usually skidding all the way down.

The light touch needed to ski this icy stuff is interrupted by these other things that you can't 'lightly' ski through.........the piles, etc. My balance is not as good as it should be (thanks to MS), so I feel like a gyroscope trying to stay upright. It's a scary thing.

Moving seems to be the best answer to my continued happiness in skiing. It's getting so that I don't even want to go out here anymore.
Bonni,

I was unaware you have MS and that it affects your Balance, I cannot in good conscious encourage you to keep skiing steeps if it may place you in serious danger, however if you are dead-set determined to attempt them and you can side-slip them then I recommend that you continue this approach focusing on your weaker side until it no longer causes you fear to side-slip.

Then its time for an instructor to work with you on the slip pivots or other drills, but the key will be to keep your skis and more importantly feet underneath you and do not lean back as the skis seek the fall line but rather unweight them and continue a smooth pivot back to a sideslip.

If you push yourself too fast too hard you will continue to beat yourself up on the ICE.

Good luck!
post #63 of 83

Yes Indeed

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Question, though: don't you think that at the extreme limits of "getting around", recreational skiers often resort to big rotary movements (upper-body) that can sabotage what we're trying to do, here? In your case, you were able to show them what intensity of steering action is beforehand, and I think that's key. So, this is increasing the intensity while maintaining some of that patience--and that's where it can get tough.
Very definitely they can resort to some large rotation. In fact, I often expect it especially if that was their primary turning mechanism. It is why I often focus the first part of a lesson on the technical part then address tactical applications in the latter half. In the case of Cory and Catherine we did see some reversion mostly because the release of the new inside ski prior to turning that was part the technical session was inhibited as they made sure they had a very secure platform from which they could turn. But in the greater sense we were also addressing the psychological need that they could ski on steeper terrain-from there we backed down a bit for ego runs and technical reinforcement. A lot of praise for a job well done and here is how what we worked on in the morning would have made it even more effective. As you know being able to perform a maneuver in a lesson and "ownership" are two different animals. I would suspect the next time they are on similar steeper terrain we'd see less of the rotation as they move toward "ownership".
post #64 of 83
That helps me "own" your approach! Thanks, Mike. See you tomorrow?
post #65 of 83

........

Hi Bonni,
Just keep on pushing yourself to ski steeper & steeper...and mentally(just as physically)..just ski ~20' at a time.... When you really think about it..as we see when riding the lift up....that's all we can ski anyways. We adults(?) are really afraid of distances in height, not really the steepness...when at the top of some formation, we adults always look to the lowest point of reference...aka the valley floor.. Kids NEVER look that far!..NEVER.
post #66 of 83
Bonnie, I agree with Rusty above. I ski ice here in PA all the time, and when I first started as a kid, I was lucky that my non-skiing parents would pay for my skis to get sharpened a lot... a worrying mom, for sure. Now that I'm 28, my best advice for folks who hate ice is kind of a silly solution: ski the cruddy areas and small bumps instead. I ski at 7 Springs outside Pittsburgh and unless we get 4 or more inches the night before, I head to lift line type runs that most people stay off of. Lets face it, too many boarders like to push what snow is on our East Coast groomers off, butterknife style... and then all we have is the cement! So sharpen up and/or get used to skiing areas that the weekenders usually avoid! Hope that helps!

Now I'm off to read the pow posts since my first 2 trips west are in the next 3 months! Finally make enough loot to do it, so why not twice?! 10 days in Utah mid Jan. and 10 more in CO early March! I forsee several deep-snow yard sales for me! Hope I can find the sticks when or if they come off! Gotta try em all though, that's how I've always learned... the hard way! Good Luck! :
post #67 of 83
Reddgabe, be sure to hook up with some Bears while you're here. There should be quite a few of us around for skiing in March... Watch the Meet on the Hill Forum (or post your own thread there).
post #68 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
That helps me "own" your approach! Thanks, Mike. See you tomorrow?
I'll be there.
post #69 of 83
Thread Starter 
Guys, guys, guys! I'm not talking Corbet's here! I'm not even in that league. Not even close.

Kind of runs I mean are like Gondolier, Switchback or Perry Merrill at Stowe. I can do them in good snow. I can do them in ice (I get down, it ain't pretty, but they don't scare me.

It's anything Steeper than that. I'm stuck on that level.

Why do I want to go steeper? To quote Springsteen, "Cause Momma......that's where the fun is!" I want to ski where everyone else skis and not stay on the baby blues all the time.
post #70 of 83
I can't reference the runs that Bonni's talking about because I've not skied any of them, but I strongly suspect that we're talking about the same type of pitches.

The 2 things that motivate me are that: (1) judging from what a few instructors who've seen me ski at the end of last season have said, I have the technical skills to get my skis around without undue rotary -- probably not a super clean carve on a tight radius, but edged -- so I suspect my problem is a mental one, not nessarily one of skill; (2) I'd like to be able to ski more terrain that Mr delta skis. Not that he's pushing -- not at all. In fact, frankly, he's a model of how you want to be if you want to convince your never-ever SO to keep on skiing. But I really enjoy that we can ski more and more of a mountain together instead of having to arrange to meet at a spot when he takes the high road and I the low, so to speak.

I like the advice of getting help with a line down a particular slope. That's still a skill I can't seem to master. When I ski behind someone better than I am, I'm fine. But when I have to choose the tactics, things don't fare so well with me.
post #71 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre
You will go where you look and gain feeling from what you look at. Get to the top of something steep and look all the way to the bottom and you will get the feeling of skiing it in one turn to the bottom. Solution; DON'T LOOK DOWN THE DAMN SLOPE.

Plot your course and look for one turn at a time. Better yet follow someone competent who can do this effortlessly ahead of you and match them turn for turn only looking to where they are. DON'T LOOK DOWN THE DAMN SLOPE.

Another solution is do some steep two story residential roofing.
Good advice! I used to not be afraid on something steep but now if it's steep and wide open, it really scares me (strangely a run that is narrow and steep is not usually a problem). I use exactly the same approach -- just "don't look down the slope" and it usually works pretty well. Try it and good luck.
post #72 of 83
Bonni,

I read all the posts. My question is why you want to ski the steeps. Skiing should be fun, not terrifying. There are so many times I just say no, especialy out west. If you are having fun on the groomed blues then maybe thats where you should hang out. Not everyone likes to have the crap scared out of them. I do once in a while but sometimes regret it later. Not everyone needs to challenge themselves all the time. My wife won't ski half the stuff I do and thats fine with both of us. We all reach our limit at some point, why try to exceed it. I don't do cliffs and never will. I have no desire to even try them. Steep icy mogul runs get the best of me too. And yes I feel the same way about moving so I don't have to deal with them as much. Isn't going to happen though so I am stuck with dealing with them for now. My fear is falling down a 35 degree icy pitch and not being able to go to work for the next month. So I pass them up, a lot. Ticks me off but it's better than bashing your self up. I know my limits and only exceed them once in a while. I'd like to keep skiing for as long as possible and you prolly would like too.
P.S. Last April I skied down a pitch that was as steep as I ever tried. took me 10 minutes to get the nerve up. Didn't know my wife could see me from the base (this was at Snow Bird). After I get back she tells me she saw a guy ragdoll down the whole thing. That night at the hotel we ran into him. Full cast on his leg, crutches, banged up. Made me think about what I did for a while. Nothing wrong with staying on the blue cruisers.
post #73 of 83
Thread Starter 
Ok, eyeski, you can stay on the blue cruisers with the noobs and masses of people vying for elbow room. Chances of getting hurt are greater with the sheer numbers of people that Don't Know How To Ski thinking they can on those runs. You know......the gapers on rentals in a tuck with poles in the air mainlining down something unable to turn? I want OUTTA THERE!

I'd like to ski the STEEPER (not STEEPS, ie cliff, couliors, etc) runs other than the blues no matter where I go. It's attainable.......I'd like to know how I can stop fearing and start doing.
post #74 of 83
Bonni,

There's gotta be something more. You don't have an idea of what it is that bothers you? I've worked with lots of folks (ladies) helping them to overcome fears. I've got some ideas on things to work on. PM me. Off to Alta....

L
post #75 of 83
Hey Bonni, I totally get what you are saying. We have an area here that has night skiing with much the same conditions you speak of. With the added bonus of having 80-90% teenage snowboarders. I don't go there anymore.
Steep icy stuff not only requires really good balance to ski well, it can be physically and mentally exhausting. Without decent lower angle stuff to work on technique it seems like an impossible situation.
post #76 of 83
Bonni:

My meager qualifications: Skier since 1972, no formal training, good skill level, capable of skiing virtually all conditions and pitches.

I understand your gear is sufficient for the steeps and conditions you are skiing, and your gear is properly tuned, waxed, and the edges are sharp.

Psychological

Your brain is the most powerful organ you possess. It can be a power for greatness or smallness. It is difficult to control and must often be retrained. The Placebo effect is an example of the good power the brain possesses. It believes you are receiving a drug, which will speed healing, and, viola, healing is faster. Unwarranted fears are an example of the opposite; they paralyze the individual and make functioning in the situation difficult or perhaps impossible.

To address your psychological issues on the steeps you need to build confidence by skiing steep slopes you can ski well and fluidly. Each run, or day, add steeper and more difficult skiing working diligently to master each steepness issue before moving on.

Skis

Tune, sharpen, wax before skiing the steeps, especially icy or hardpan steeps.

Skiing Skills

1. You need an upright stance. Most who have difficulty in the steeps either adopt a backward lean, inward lean, or break at the waist.

a. Backward lean places weight on tails and makes the skis very fast and reduces control. Experts avoid this position but occasionally us it. If you are not an expert this position if nearly always fatal in the steeps. You must keep your weight balanced over the balls of you feet.

b. Inward lean is nearly as bad as backward lean since it forces your ski edges away from contact with the snow and makes it more likely your skis will slide out from under you. This is a "safe" feeling position but it also is nearly always fatal in the steeps. Your weight should be balanced between your skis and a bit more towards the downhill ski.

c. Break at the waist is another problem that causes your center of gravity to lower (which is not a bad thing) but it forces you to sit back and move your chest forward to keep balanced. You cannot adapt or react to conditions from this position. The result is a loss of control. Ski in an upright, athletic skiers stance.

2. Pole plant is critical in the steeps. You need a strong reaching pole plant to force your body downhill. This permits your center of mass to crossover the balance point (your downhill ski) the result is you are forced to turn your skis straight down the fall line.

3. Fall line is where the action is and where you need to be. Big arcing curves with long traverses feel safe. They are not. You are most prone to fall while in a static traverse then when aggressively skiing straight down the fall line. Counterintuitive but true. To ski the fall line you need to keep you head high, look far down the fall line (4 turns is good), and make quick transitions from foot to foot. While you can use the tried and true hop, or jet turn, you will look better if you use a more fluid compression/explosion turn. In this turn you compress while entering the turn, crossover, and then let the energy stored in the skis pop them out of the turn and into the next. Ok, so I am partial to that technique, you can use something more feminine and fluid.

4. Rent videos and watch how really great skiers ski the really steeps. Envision yourself doing the same. Think of how they are doing each aspect of the turn. Feel what it must feel like to them. Get used to it. This will help your muscle training, and your psychological training.

5. Challenge yourself every time you ski.

6. Have fun and remain willing to talk to me once you are a truly great skier.

Mark
post #77 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
Ok, eyeski, you can stay on the blue cruisers with the noobs and masses of people vying for elbow room. Chances of getting hurt are greater with the sheer numbers of people that Don't Know How To Ski thinking they can on those runs. You know......the gapers on rentals in a tuck with poles in the air mainlining down something unable to turn? I want OUTTA THERE!

I'd like to ski the STEEPER (not STEEPS, ie cliff, couliors, etc) runs other than the blues no matter where I go. It's attainable.......I'd like to know how I can stop fearing and start doing.
The last place you will find me is on the blues, I prefer the steeps. I will prolly never get rid of my fear of hitting sheet ice on a 30 degree+ pitch but it happens. I just try to stay balanced until I can find some snow to turn on. I prefer to ski out west and this is one reason. Our eastern conditions can be hairy. Lot of good advice around here. That plus practice might help you. My point was that sometimes we hit out limit and it can be very dangerous to exceed it. But if you still feel that you want to push it higher, more power to you. I take a good lesson once a year, out west usualy. It has helped a lot. Especialy the one I took at JH. All day for $80.00. Best deal around. Changed the way I ski the bumps. Now I seek them out.
post #78 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
Guys, guys, guys! I'm not talking Corbet's here! I'm not even in that league. Not even close.

Kind of runs I mean are like Gondolier, Switchback or Perry Merrill at Stowe. I can do them in good snow. I can do them in ice (I get down, it ain't pretty, but they don't scare me.

It's anything Steeper than that. I'm stuck on that level.

Why do I want to go steeper? To quote Springsteen, "Cause Momma......that's where the fun is!" I want to ski where everyone else skis and not stay on the baby blues all the time.
Ok Bonni,

Having just done the ESA at Stowe, here are my Stowe recommendations for you.
Before you try Rusty's Stowe Steep Program, make sure you:
a) have your skis freshly tuned (wax and sharp edges)
b) can do 3 hop turns in a row
c) can ski backwards from Midway Lodge to the Gondola entrance
d) can carve a traverse to an uphill stop leaving railroad tracks in the snow
e) have buddy to go with you

RSSP will use 3 runs:
1) Main Street off the new sensation quad
(It's got lots of little steep pitches interspersed with mild blue terrain)
2) Lower Gondolier (the last steep pitch just above the Miday Lodge)
3) Hayride (go up Liftline and come down Lord to Hayride)

On Main Street, I want you to stop at the top of each little steep pitch and look at it like you're scared. Criss cross traverse each pitch rediculously slow, even if you don't need to. Do another lap taking wide turns on the steeps with finishing each turn a little up hill. Do another run straight running the last half of each steep. Say bad things about Rusty at the bottom.

On Lower Gondolier, do short radius turns in the fall line (no wider than 2 cat widths). Next, get from the top to the bottom of the steep pitch in no more than 4 turns. Ski the entire pitch backwards. Finally, do medium radius turns (at least 3-4 cat widths wide) as SLOW as possible.

While riding up the chair on Liftline, watch other skiers coming down. Find the slowest skiers to watch. Don't worry about their form. Observe their tactics. Turn in the chair and look at the trail looking downhill. Imagine you are skiing it. Look at the steepest, iciest sections. What tactics would you use to get around them? Hayride is a wide, wandering trail that does not go too far before flattening out. This is your test trail. Try to do the slow medium radius turns. If, at any time, the view looks scary, then stop on the edge of the trail and stare into the woods. Then do a very slow traverse back and forth looking only to the side of the trail. Every now and then, stop and look up the trail to see how steep you've already done. Give yourself 45 minutes to get from the top of the trail to the bottom. Don't take less than 30.

Or forget all of this and just take a private with Epic. I can understand why you want to get off Gondolier. Please note that I was in Rogan's group at ESA. We spent a lot of time on Gondolier. A lot of time working on things. Before we started doing laps on Liftline. When it was really nasty firm snow. Rogan's line of the day was "That was bad. Let's do it again". And that's why you want to ski those trails. You can do it. We can help.
post #79 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Ok Bonni,

Having just done the ESA at Stowe, here are my Stowe recommendations for you.
Before you try Rusty's Stowe Steep Program, make sure you:
a) have your skis freshly tuned (wax and sharp edges) check
b) can do 3 hop turns in a row uh, no
c) can ski backwards from Midway Lodge to the Gondola entrance uh, no
d) can carve a traverse to an uphill stop leaving railroad tracks in the snow uh, almost there
e) have buddy to go with you check

RSSP will use 3 runs:
1) Main Street off the new sensation quad
(It's got lots of little steep pitches interspersed with mild blue terrain)
2) Lower Gondolier (the last steep pitch just above the Miday Lodge)
3) Hayride (go up Liftline and come down Lord to Hayride)

On Main Street, I want you to stop at the top of each little steep pitch and look at it like you're scared. Criss cross traverse each pitch rediculously slow, even if you don't need to. Do another lap taking wide turns on the steeps with finishing each turn a little up hill. Do another run straight running the last half of each steep. Say bad things about Rusty at the bottom. check

On Lower Gondolier, do short radius turns in the fall line (no wider than 2 cat widths). which cat? I have 3! Next, get from the top to the bottom of the steep pitch in no more than 4 turns. Ski the entire pitch backwards. Finally, do medium radius turns (at least 3-4 cat widths wide) as SLOW as possible. here is where I think you're joking. I can't ski backward......sorry.

While riding up the chair on Liftline, watch other skiers coming down. Find the slowest skiers to watch. Don't worry about their form. Observe their tactics. Turn in the chair and look at the trail looking downhill. Imagine you are skiing it. Look at the steepest, iciest sections. What tactics would you use to get around them? Hayride is a wide, wandering trail that does not go too far before flattening out. This is your test trail. Try to do the slow medium radius turns. If, at any time, the view looks scary, then stop on the edge of the trail and stare into the woods. Then do a very slow traverse back and forth looking only to the side of the trail. Every now and then, stop and look up the trail to see how steep you've already done. Give yourself 45 minutes to get from the top of the trail to the bottom. Don't take less than 30.

This is where all the guys who can ski this come screaming down and bark that 'If you can't ski this steepness, you shouldn't be there!!!!' It's what you hear over and over in this forum.

Or forget all of this and just take a private with Epic. Would that I could.I can understand why you want to get off Gondolier. Please note that I was in Rogan's group at ESA. We spent a lot of time on Gondolier. A lot of time working on things. Before we started doing laps on Liftline. When it was really nasty firm snow. Rogan's line of the day was "That was bad. Let's do it again". And that's why you want to ski those trails. You can do it. We can help.
Ghosts of Depots Past? The correct phrase is: You can do it. We can watch. If you're an employee, the correct phrase is: You can do it. Go to hell.


The reason I used Gondolier was just for reference. It's a widely known run out here. We're over 3 hours from Stowe, so we don't ski there on a regular basis. You wouldn't know the names of stuff we normally ski.

Yesterday we went to Berkshire East (which had some pretty good conditions, actually!) I spent the day on the green stuff working on stability. Some of the blue stuff (Competition) has some good pitch to it. The blacks were too scary to even look at.

I need more skills and time on hill.
post #80 of 83
Thread Starter 
Maddog....

Thanks for the advice. I think that hopping around on the icy black runs out here would not be a good idea, though.

After pitch is under control, then I'll work on powder. We don't have that out here either. It's as difficult to ski as sand for me. What a mess!
post #81 of 83
Bonni

for some (wimp) perspective......

When I started learning to ski & was an lower level skier I was very loathe to turn unless I could find a NICE patch of snow......

Now I live in a warm FLAT land... so pitch is not too much of an issue for us.... but NICE snow - forget it! It gets REALLY warm during the day & it all turns to soup(like there are bits that are nearly clear & you STOP when you hit it unless you go fast & surf it!

Overnight of course all the slop piles freeze up....

So then you have hardpack & death cookies (up to 6- 9 inches across is common because they struggle to groom at right times).....

I was told that to learn to ski it I had to practice....

So EVERY morning at 8:30am I was riding the lift to the next slope from our beginner area & skiing the green run there..... & MOST days a poor boarder instructor(level 3 - with telemarker instructor brother) would be there with a private.... & EVERY day as I went past he would yell " RELAX disski it will be easier if you RELAX" and every day my heart would be in my throat & I would only ski it because we were the only people there....

I now would not blink skiing the blue runs there in same conditions & happily ski the off-piste in almost anything(not very steep but bumpy & a bit of a narrow runout)
the run I told you used to scare me is a black on the other side (steeper side) of the mountain.... & even it no longer gets me REALLY scared - just worried enough to be chanting "softly on the skis - keep moving"

It is all a matter of mileage & some GOOD instruction in the conditions - I know you had the lessons - so just keep the mileage going on the stuff you CAN ski.... & eventually you will be able to ski the harder stuff....

If I can do this you probably can as well...... it is just harder for us than "normal" people as our balance is less useful
post #82 of 83
Bonni,

The "before" tasks are stuff you can work on. When you can do those tasks, Brain will be ready to let you go to the next level. When you do the 3 step RSSP, that's what gets brain convinced to not freak out on Stowe quality blacks.

Yes, I made all this stuff up on the fly. No, the particular tasks are not set in stone. The point is that these are the kinds of things that need to be done to get to the point where you are ready to not freeze up attempting the steeps. Since you'd been to Stowe, I had hoped that you would at least understand the difficulty of the tasks relative to the actual pitch of the slopes. If you can find similar terrain at home great. If you're motivated to "fix" your problem, is it worth a trip back to Stowe? 3 hours to Stowe is within reach. It's only a 10 hour drive for me.

Hop turns help build your confidence that you can steer the skis quickly out of the fall line.

Skiing backwards is a mind trick. If you are skiing Gondolier comfortably, you can get in a backwards wedge and ski backwards at 2 miles per hour down a green pitch. The reverse weighting (right foot weight to turn right)you use to steer in a wedge and the discomfort at going backwards train Brain to do difficult tasks in uncomfortable situations. I want you to practice backwards skiing on the flat pitch between midway and the gondy. Once you are comfortable with that, then try backing down the steep pitch. The beauty of this is that any time you freak out on the steep pitch, you can always swing around and finish forward. Changing backwards from Midway down to the steep pitch down is equivalent to going forwards from any other part of Gondolier down to going down Hayride.

The railroad tracks in a traverse help to give you efficiency so that you can ski a steep run without wearing yourself out. The more you can carve vs skid, the less work you'll be doing. It's possible to power wedge straight down a steep slope (we see kids do this often), but it burns your legs out quickly. If you get tired coming down a black trail from fighting it, it's only going to make it worse.

If you're going to use kitty cats, you'll need a few more. But I've heard they don't like snow any more than water. Try Snow Cats or groomers or 8-12 feet instead. Use more or less width if you have to, but the point in saying no more or no less than a certain width is to make it uncomfortable. Cheating is ok to start, but won't help if you can't get there eventually.

If anyone yells at you for going down a steep run slow, well that's what your buddy is for. Why do we have baskets on poles? So the snowboarders (and yelling steep skiers) don't go all the way up to the grips when you stab them. If you can't control yourself on steeps, you are a danger to others on the slope and you should not be there. Such people should be advised to change their behaviour, but not yelled at. People who yell at lesser skilled people who are in control are rude and should be politely informed of that fact (however, if your buddy says piss off instead of please read Your Responsibility Code, we'll forgive him).

Hopefully this kind of stuff can help you build your skills in less time.
post #83 of 83
Thread Starter 
Thanks, therusty. These are all good things and I WILL try them.

Well, all but the going backward on a steeper pitch than green. Depends on the green, too. At the home hill, I CAN go backward down it. It's SOOOOO flat. At Berkshire East, I can't go backward down any of their greens. They're like Blues at the home hill. It's all relative.

Thanks for taking the time to address these things, peeps. I'm going to try to get to ESA East next year and do some work with a good coach.
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