or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › How to proceed with teaching someone new?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How to proceed with teaching someone new?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Howdy everyone. Nice forums. Glad to be aboard.

I've been skiing actively for about 4 years and ski primarily in the Poconos (lots of ice) but have gotten to Killington, Sunday River and others in the Northeast. I've yet to ski powder anywhere but look forward to that some day. I also ski most of the terrain here now. I'm certainly no expert and still have a LOT to learn but most who watch me say I'm doing quite nicely and have the basics down.

That said, my youngest brother has no decided that he'd like to see what all the interest is in this skiing thing. <grin> He's asked me if I'd be willing to get him started. I realize it'd be optimal to just get him lessons but he's also a starving college student and would like to just have me spend a day with him to avoid as much embarrassment as possible.

The question is, is this a waste of time for me? I realize I'm not an instructor and may instill some bad habits but I'm usually fairly detail-oriented and remember my early instruction well. I also learned from my own brother without instruction and was skiing around just fine early on (got instruction later and will likely continue to get it for life).

If I can meet his request, what should the focus be on that first day? I'm pretty tedious so things would go rather slowly. Familiarity with the equipment before even putting it on. Putting on one ski, moving it a bit, then the other, etc. He's also a very good rollerblader so some of that should help this process out. I've also inundated him online tutorials, videos, pictures and discussion.
post #2 of 9
for a first timer, I would put them in a class. Most resorts have good programs for never evers. I don't know about the east coast but most of the resorts here have programs that are generally about the same price and even less expensive than renting gear, and buying a ticket etc.. For instance, rental of equipment (even from a location off hill) 25.00. all day lift pass, 49.00 (holiday would be 59.00 here) Ala carte lesson is 40.00 for a total of 114.00. the group package first timer class is 85 here. Young adult (up to 22) would be 75.00. A second visit would be same offering except 20.00 less so 65.00 or 55.00 depending on age.


At our resort, our learning center actually has it's on rental shop and ticket office so it's not slowed down (as much) as the main rental location. This means better attention and better instruction on use of the equipment.
post #3 of 9
yeah, as most mountains a beginner package with lift, lesson and rental will be just about the same price as lift and rentals purchased seperately. Get him the beginner package and then pick it up with him after the lesson. You'l get 1.5 hours of skiing time in and then you can help with pointers after the lesson.
post #4 of 9
somewhere along the line, taking a class IS recommended. however, it may not be necessary to do it for his first day, provided that you can rent skis and get a limited (lower) mountain pass (not all places offer one) for less than the cost of lessons and rental (usually the rental is incl. with the class cost but dbl-check) *and* if you're willing to at least spend 2-3hrs with him showing him some basics.

the reason why you can probably skip classes for his first session (though i'd generally recommend that he take a class within his first 2-4 times on skis) is that there's not very much they teach you on your first day that any reasonably competent skier couldn't show him and the learning curve for the majority of people on the first day is the lowest of any session. usually session 1 consists of fitting, walking on skis, how to fall and get up, simple gliding, balancing, simple turning and the wedge stop...nothing complicated at all.

OTOH, there really isn't any stigma attached to taking lessons no matter how old you are. any embarrassment is purely in their own mind since classes are grouped by skill and i'll guarantee you that the day #1 class will all be newbies.

btw, i happened to take lessons for the first three times that i skiied. the cost of the 3 day lesson package was cheaper than the lift ticket/rental for the same time period.
post #5 of 9
Agrajag,

you're probably better off spending your own money than trying to teach him. It'll save both of you quite a bit of aggrivation and possibly straining your relationship with your brother.

If he's putting out the mney for lifts and rentals, it'll only cost you about $40 to put him in a beginner lesson or a few bucks more for a private. If he's athletic, he'll pick it up quick, but you need to know what to teach him, the order of things to teach and how to communicate it effectively.

That said, if you don't have the $, I think there's a thread from a few days ago where someone asked the same thing, and people posted a progression of a beginners lesson. If you choose to use that, print it all out and take it with you and expect it to take a few hours and be mildly frustrating if he doesn't get what you ask him to do.
post #6 of 9
Some places have packages like a lost leader in a store. They may be priced the same as an all day ticket and contain cupons for the snack bar and cupons for a second day that may add up to be better than teaching him yourself. Shop around for beginner packages. I think you will be pleasantly supprised.
post #7 of 9
agrajag,
dchan and learn2turn are giving you excellent advice-----and one more piece of advice, keep your brother on green runs for the first day, don't be in a hurry to get him to more difficult runs. He will advance his skiing more quickly if he doesn't develope defenisive movements b/c the terrain is too difficult.

RW

Quote:
less is more
post #8 of 9
I'm pretty familiar with the issues of "real estate" in the Poconos.

What I mean by that, is that you will be pretty hard pressed to find a suitable "quiet" spot on gentle terrain to conduct a lesson.

The lesson areas are for ski school classes only and you will get booted out on most days. That puts you out on the "bunny hill" and especially on weekends, that is not the place you want to be.

The best thing in the world is to have him spend that hour and a half with a class .... during the week when the pressure is low all over the hill and the class size is usually small.
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlterEgo
OTOH, there really isn't any stigma attached to taking lessons no matter how old you are. any embarrassment is purely in their own mind since classes are grouped by skill and i'll guarantee you that the day #1 class will all be newbies.
I'll say!

I just took my first lesson at the age of 35... as a newbie on a snowboard. The four others in my class had to have been between the ages of 12 and 15. No awkward discomfort whatsoever (seriously).

Was the 90 minute lesson worth it? Ehhh... lets just say that I'm glad I read the first couple section of The Illustrated Guide to Snowboarding the previous night. Not exactly the expert caliber PISA-quality instruction I expected for **cough** twenty-six bucks.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › How to proceed with teaching someone new?