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Digital Camera Help

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I am looking to buy my first digital camera, and was wondering if anyone on here could contribute some of the experiences with various digital cameras.

I am looking for someting that is point and shoot, and as compact as possible. Preferable something that I can fit into one of those little pelican cases, so I can also take it kayaking with me. I want something that is going to take high quality pictures, and not instantly become obsolete. Also, the ability to take short video clips is a plus.

I really don't want to spend anything more than $300, is this realistic? Also, I have a gift certificate to amazon, so it would be a plus if i could buy it from there.
post #2 of 20
Do a search with "camera" in the title of the thread. You'll find quite a number of threads with lots of good information on this.
post #3 of 20
I have always liked the small Canons -- Digital ELPH. I have an older one and it's been great. I purposely looked for the smallest camera I could find that still had decent features and good image quality, because I wanted to be able to take it everywhere. The ELPH easily fits in a pocket and is really tough. My older one (circa 2001) has a stainless steel body!

CRaig
post #4 of 20
My dad has a Nikkon 5600 I think. It works pretty well. I have a Kodak easy share C340. Both are decent cameras, but I prefer the 5600. When you are shopping make sure that if you intend to use the camera for instructional purposes, that it will do a sports sequence of some sort. My camera will only do 3 shots, so it is kind of useless for skiing analysis (haven't tried the video yet). My father's will do up to 24 low resolution shots and 16 higher resolution shots I think. I have't had a chance to piece them together into a sequence shot yet, but I know it can be done.

As far as point and shoot goes, they both take very crisp, clear pictures.

Later

GREG

(I think they are both well below your price maximum, which would allow you to get yourself a 1 GB SD memory card for them)
post #5 of 20
Check out this site www.dpreview.com

Usually, small cameras have problem with taking good quality shots.
post #6 of 20
Take a look at the Casio Exilim series- super thin (thinner than an ipod), 5mp, price between $200 and $350.
post #7 of 20
FWIW, I thought about getting a digitial camera for my mom for Christmas, and the camera store guy told me that the Nikons were the best as far as "simple" cameras go.
post #8 of 20
I use the Canon Powershot A-520

http://canon.ca/english/index-produc...23&gid=2&ovr=1

Indoor lower light shots need the Manual rotator dial setting, some practice shots to get the aparature right and either a real steady hand or setting on a tripod or solid object.

The auto works fine indoors it just looks flashy and indoorsy.

outside in good light it works great and I barely get a bad or unusable shot.

some eg of the photos it takes. Most of these are just "auto" point and shoot. Much better is obtained with using the manual settings.
http://groups.msn.com/BikersfromAlbe...cs.msnw?Page=1
post #9 of 20
I use a Canon A620 but for waterproof digital in your price range try the Pentax Optio WP 5 megapixel camera. http://www.dpreview.com/news/0501/05...ax_optiowp.asp
post #10 of 20
I've got a 4 megapixel elph/ixus and it's great, but yesterday some of my students had a 550, which is 5 mp, and it was half the thickness of my one, and the screen on the back was massive! This thing is tiny, but if the shots are as good as my elph (and apparently the pic quality hasn't diminished) then it's a winner. And it's tiny.

when you narrow down some models,check out the reviews on DPreview.com and Steve's digital cameras. They offer a good summary. I'm about to get a Panasonic Lumix DMC FZ30 after using those sites to narrow down my choice.
post #11 of 20
I have the 4MP canon ixus 40 (that is a UK model number, the identical machine is on the US market with a different model). While the sensor may seem a little on the low side in modern terms, I actually think it is just fine unless you want enormous pictures- for me at least, I rarely go bigger than a 4.5x6 so this isnt a worry.... even at A4 it is OK.... if you were going to do this alot, a bigger sensor would prob be worthwhile.

We also recently bought a casio z120. It isnt as thin as the canon but it has a 7MP sensor and seems lovely to use. It also makes use of AA batteries so saves on the hassle of silly proprietary designs which cost a fortune!

Adam
post #12 of 20
I have the Kodak V530. The pictures are very clear. Has settings for snow background so you don't get the glare, Movie taking capabilities, 5 megapixl, pocket size. Sam's club has them for $229. Very nice camera for a little price.
post #13 of 20
I have the Casio elixim Z55. It's a great little camera for the price, and the size is perfect to stash in your ski coat!
-Snowmiser-
post #14 of 20
I have a Canon G3 that works extremely well. Before that I had a Fuji FinePix 2600.

ask yourself what size prints you expect to make, and what detail you want. those two things are the primary controlling factors when deciding what features you need from a digital camera. all the silly professional reviews talk about ergonomics etc., which are critical if you are a pro or superfrequent amateur photographer. but for the average photographer, it's easy to just learn the layout of whatever camera you buy.

I found it easy to shop for digital cameras after I learned to focus on these criteria.

- size print desired
- level of detail wanted
- frequency of low-light/night photography
- mfr's durability/quality reputation
- price
post #15 of 20
There are several things that drive me nuts about most of the small digital point and shoots for ski use (or outdoor use in general). It is simple to find cameras that address one or two of these issues, but I am not aware of any that cover all the bases. If anyone knows of a small digital camera that addresses all of these, I'd sure love to know about it...

- Very short or no battery life in the cold
- Viewfinder totally washed out in bright light
- Shutter lag (fast skiers out of frame before camera reacts to button push)
- Weather/water resistance (+bonus for any way to address condensation)

From my point of view, virtually all the mainstream cameras take pretty decent pictures when conditions are favorable.
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift
There are several things that drive me nuts about most of the small digital point and shoots for ski use (or outdoor use in general). It is simple to find cameras that address one or two of these issues, but I am not aware of any that cover all the bases. If anyone knows of a small digital camera that addresses all of these, I'd sure love to know about it...

- Very short or no battery life in the cold
- Viewfinder totally washed out in bright light
- Shutter lag (fast skiers out of frame before camera reacts to button push)
- Weather/water resistance (+bonus for any way to address condensation)

From my point of view, virtually all the mainstream cameras take pretty decent pictures when conditions are favorable.
The Kodak V530 addresses three of these:
Lithium Ion Battery lasts a long time
Shutter is much faster than the old pics and the movie taking option on this camera keeps the real time movie, and as 9-12 individual pics(depending on movie length.)
It is not water resistant completely but it is definitely weather resistant. I have used it MANY times in rainy weather.

The only thing that is not addressed is the washout of the viewfinder. Can't help you there. You'd need to get a camera witha digital and optical lense for that, then you are getting in to something that isn't pocket size.
post #17 of 20
post #18 of 20

Look at: http://www.dpreview.com/

Hi ! Digital cameraes these days are in general of such high quality, that it is very hard to go wrong. A really good place to start is: http://www.dpreview.com/
post #19 of 20
I will second the Canon Elph. They are small and rugged. I used mine for a week in Switzerland. The Canon software is bullet-proof. The SL400 can probably be bought in your price range. I would suggest getting a big (512MB or 1 GB) flash chip so you can use the highest quality picture acquisition and not have to worry about downloading shots in the middle of a trip. I would also recommend a second battery. $300 is reasonable for the camera, but you really need the big chip and second battery which add to the cost.
post #20 of 20
Bought my wife a Cannon SD400 for Christmas. Extremely compact and takes great pics! Will easily fit into the ipod pocket found on many new jackets. I did a lot of research before buying this camera.
Patprof
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