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Suggestions for Education & Enforcement on-piste

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
1. Penalty Box - Infractions for Minor, Major, and Game Misconduct to be served out in full view of the largest lift line at the resort. Maybe a stockade?

2. Bib Numbers - How else are you going to be able to tell who ran crudmeister down if you saw it from a distance? http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=20999

3. Post the rules in the lift areas/towers and on the maps/brochures with some prominence that suggests the ski resort takes safety seriously.

4. Mountain resort cooperation blacklisting. OK, even I hate this idea, but c'mon, its the Internet after all.

5. Insert your idea here.
post #2 of 11
no cops.

"enforcement" is too schutzstapfel for my blood.
post #3 of 11
How about this, you take off your Oakleys, look the people in the eye and in a calm and rational fashion explain the reason you are talking to them, what it is that they are doing that is out of line. You then thank them for listening and wish them a great day.

It works for me.
post #4 of 11
Back to real enforcement instead of the Sesame Street approach ..... first we put a "black circle" on the ticket ..... then we put a red "X" through the black circle ..... then (yawn) ..... if we catch you again with a red X in a black circle you have to see "the video" ....... OH! HORROR AND DREAD ... "a video" .....

What are the statistics on getting nailed three times in one day by a bunch of "Rangers" who stand out like sore thumbs in bright yellow jackets?

Give all mountain employees "crayons" ..... the Patrol and the Instructors too.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunion
How about this, you take off your Oakleys, look the people in the eye and in a calm and rational fashion explain the reason you are talking to them, what it is that they are doing that is out of line. You then thank them for listening and wish them a great day.

It works for me.
At least while you are still around. The moment you get out of sight they call you a jerk and think you should mind your own business.

This line of reasoning works on people who aren't self centered enough to actually absorb what you are talking to them about. That type of person usually will not need to be talked to in the first place.

People who are intentionally being a menace or skiing recklessly are typically not going to be interested in a heart to heart on why they shouldn't break the rules. They already know they are breaking rules, and thats the whole point of doing it.

I don't like the idea of ski patrol cops either and would probably not be skiing at a mountain that had them because I wouldn't want to get nailed by mistake or taken advantage of by an abusive patroller on a power trip. I'm also not sure it would really improve the situation as every road I travel has traffic cops but that doesn't stop people from intentionally driving recklessly on the highway. That would be an interesting study. Gather data on conditions, skier visits, and number of collision related injuries for a given area and then post traffic cops around the mountain and see if there is any correlation to a lower number of injuries per skier visit on days with like conditions.
post #6 of 11
JUST SAY NO, then go tell the ski patrol
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunion
How about this, you take off your Oakleys, look the people in the eye and in a calm and rational fashion explain the reason you are talking to them, what it is that they are doing that is out of line. You then thank them for listening and wish them a great day.

It works for me.
What are you - some kind of liberal freak?! Clearly, ski resorts need the "ambience" of a US airport.
post #8 of 11
[quote=bunion]How about this, you take off your Oakleys, look the people in the eye and in a calm and rational fashion explain the reason you are talking to them, what it is that they are doing that is out of line. You then thank them for listening and wish them a great day.quote]


That's how they do it at Mad River Glen unless you do something real bad. It gets the point across and builds respect for the authority of the ski patrol.

Ski areas are often too quick to cut someones ticket.

I also like time out for snowboardes, that might help.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl
At least while you are still around. The moment you get out of sight they call you a jerk and think you should mind your own business.

This line of reasoning works on people who aren't self centered enough to actually absorb what you are talking to them about. That type of person usually will not need to be talked to in the first place.
You are probably right, but here is an example of this very method working quite well.

My area has a ton of kids, many times kids (as well as adults) don't know the consequences of their actions---not from malicious intent---just lack of lack of knowledge.

Bouncing a chair up and down. All it takes in one to start and sometimes you end up with 3 or 4 chaires of kids laughing and bouncing away---having a grand ole time. Most times, nothing malicious going on.

I'll yell at them to stop, and if I am on the lift behind them---I tell them to wait until I get off ---I want to talk to them.

Basically I describe in as graphic detail (embelished as needed) as I need to, the consequences of bouncing a chair off the transport wheels and what happens when there is suddenly no support for the cable. I tell them, quite calmly, that we'll treat their broken bodies as best we can---that is if they survive both the crash to the ground AND the slingshot effect on the rebound.

It is also a good time to segway into the hazards of jumping off a chair. You can cover quite a bit of ground in just a few minutes---and usually---one talk is all it takes. Often, you'll hear them telling their friends to stop bouncing the chairs.

And, yes, I have given this talk to adults too.

But, you are right, the idiots won't absorb it
post #10 of 11
Resorts usually put policy information on their trail maps which they ought to but that is far from enough. Many beginers and novices are certainly more likely to read information on trail maps. More experienced skiers may read that stuff on a trail map just once in a few years so there needs to be better ways to occasionally reach them. The reality is those in ski management that would have the power to do something apparently are never interested in doing much more in terms of communicating information than other resorts. Creativity is out and conservative approaches the norm. Like they have all bought into what other resorts do and just leave it there.

You've already mentioned one solution, SIGNS. The only signs I have seen are very tersely concise and usually only are the usual skiers responsibility code. There is a lot more that could be displayed. Like boundary policies, lift riding ettiquette, use of foul language, etc. Implementations I've seen do not look as though the persons in charge were trying to seriously solve the problem as much as making resort management think they did something with signs.

There are two places posting policy can have most effect. One is to have signs at lift mazes where people must spend idle time just standing waiting for their ride. With a bit of thought, someone ought to be able to mount such signs up high enough and with large enough fonts that everyone in a maze can easily read them. And they can probably do more than just slapping on a bunch of text. Add some comical cartoon to such and they are bound to get more attention.

Another place where skiers are a captured audience ready to be enlightened is on the lifts. On detachable high speed lifts, the lifts move too quickly to put signs with much information on towers. But short concise messages like single parts of the skiers responsibility code fit that form.

Even better get hi tech and add an LED information panel that can simply display a few lines of continually changing text on a whole range of things that might be useful. Heck they could do stuff like displaying lift status information as saying that chair so and so just opened up. On a powder day I'd bet a lot of skiers would be watching the display for that alone. And it could be worth some money to them too as they might advertize that the advanced mountain ski school clinic is meeting in 15 minutes over at the base of chair 4 with drop-ins charged $20. It might even include simple weather information like the local temperature right there at the display panel and also at the top of the mountain if the guys in the exit lift station simply phoned in now and then. Its time a ski area move into the twenty-first century and I'd wager they would not be alone in what they do for long.

...David
post #11 of 11
Around here, every area's every cafeteria and restaurant has the skier responsibility code printed on the napkins. And on all the trail maps. Plus almost all of them have the code and/or terrain park "smart style it" rules posted clearly on lift towers.

The code is posted in plenty of places already. It needs to be enforced. Not with a heavy hand, and not with a misguided idea that speed in itself is bad - it's not, if the skier/rider is under control. But we don't need to post it in more places, unless we start stamping it on their a$$es for the people with their heads stuck up their butts!
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