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Mountain Responsibility Code for Kids

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Is there one? I find the need to use one word 'commands' to keep Jane safe. Here's our list - what do you do to teach the rules to your kids?

1. Always stay in control, and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.

STOP
STRAIGHT
LEFT
RIGHT

2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.

HEAD’S UP

3. You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.

NOT HERE – or - THERE

4. Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

LOOK
READY – SET - GO



http://www.nsp.org/1/nsp/Safety_Information/YourResponsibilityCode.asp
post #2 of 15
Humpty Dumpty?

Don't stop under a lift .... falling skis, phones, bottles etc.
post #3 of 15
Ok, I don't have kids but, I did witness a father teaching his son to ski.

His kid (about 3-4 yrs old) was straight-lining it down a narrow trail. As he was trying to catch up to him, he kept screaming: PIZZA, PIZZA.

lol....
post #4 of 15
Jane must be a budding prodigy...most of the kids I teach have no concept of LEFT or RIGHT! I use easily identified landmarks, i.e., GO TO THAT BIG TREE! or GO TO THE SNOWGUN! or something similar.

FWIW, I try to throw a basic nugget of on-hill etiquette into most of my lessons, from the lowest level stuff (look out for other people, look uphill, etc.) to advanced stuff that many adults still haven't nailed down (don't cut off someone that's ripping a bump line, wait your turn & yell DROP before hitting park features, etc.).
post #5 of 15
Ski safety for kids is easy.

DON'T HIT PEOPLE.
post #6 of 15
My wife skis so we usually ski in a train. One of us leads the two kids are in the middle and one of sweeps for falls. The kids can both get up so we don't need to pick them up but they like to know they are there.

My kids can tell their right from left but if I yelled at them to turn one direction under pressure they would likely mess up.

My biggest challenge when they aren't following me is to get them to be aware of other skiers and not get so close to them.
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
My biggest challenge when they aren't following me is to get them to be aware of other skiers and not get so close to them.
Yes. What can we say to get them to leave room for those around them? The scale is different for kids - Jane is half my height and easily goes twice as close as I feel comfortable. We all forget that kids think there is plenty of room. Relatively speaking, they are right, but getting them to understand that the people ahead may do something unexpected is the tough part to get across. At the same time, she can turn on a dime and gives me the look now, like - chill out Dad.
post #8 of 15
If you get lost or need help, Look for the guys with a red (insert color of your patrol) jacket and a White Cross on their back. They are like the policemen and will help you!
post #9 of 15
Depending on age,

"Make sure an adult or instructor is with you or gives you permission to ski through the tree path"

"Stop to read a few park rules each time you enter the terrain park or pipe"

Or if they are very young kids, "Make sure you are with an adult or instructor when you go into the park/pipe"
post #10 of 15
How fantastic that you are teaching some etiquette as well as technique! Last weekend we hit our local hill where it was apparently "teach your child to ski" day. It was amazing to see the same kids you saw in the morning, progressing at lightening speed! By afternoon I wanted to tell some parents to stop yelling "DO PIZZA" and let the tike experience the fun of a little speed. I don't know that you can define an area of personal space to a kid, except perhaps the length of the other person's poles? That is a concrete distance and with their fast reflexes should cover them. Ask them to imagine the "obstacle person" were to stick their poles straight out, to stay out of that area, and pass behind instead of in front where possible. Oh, and STAY OFF the back of my skis in the lift line!
post #11 of 15
This does not apply to Janesdad, but this post struck a nerve. Perhaps the best safety starts with where the parents choose to take the child. Lately, I've been seeing parents with kids under the age of five taking them on trails they have no business skiing.

Yesterday at Breckenridge, a mother had her child, who was skiing in a wedge the size of an entire mountain on a bump run. The bumps were bigger than the kids head, the trail was ridiculously crowded, people were crashing into each other right and left. Why was that a good terrain choice for a kid younger than five who was still skiing in a wedge?

Furthermore, Mom was a prime candidate for a Darwin Award. When I realized that there was no way I could ski my chosen line, for fear of hitting little Johnny, I changed my direction. Sure enough, Mom decides to ski right into my line. Gee, it's a good thing I know how to stop.

The uphill skier has the responsibility to stop, but parents should be obligated to not turn their kids into target practice!
post #12 of 15
In re: to "janesdad" keep jane safe statement . Your on the right track , but sometimes you have run interference . I often held back and was the blocker while mom lead the way . Ski one behind the other / follow the leader , it leaves more room for others to get by. If your going to venture into more challenging areas do it when there are no crowds , the code and their own safety are hand in hand . Our girls are now 13 & 14 with a good skiing ethic . Mom and dad were on them all the time about respecting other skiers plus what was safe and not .
For us one unforseen situation made it all click into place and reinforced what we where teaching them (so much that they still reference that weekend 7 yrs. later) .It started with fact they are both more protective of the gear they have than their dad is , no scratches please , etc. ,etc. ,etc. This gear protection mode they are in plus the fact we spent a weekend (when they were about 6-7yrs. old )with a family that has 2 kids the same age but on snowboards with no control set the parameters of ski ethics in their minds. That weekend of getting hit , having their skis ran over and being knocked over in lift lines was so impacting that everything we had been teaching hit home .
Also because of the constant waiting and hassle they now have no interest in snowboards ......................
an added benefit for me.
post #13 of 15
teaching kids anything requires the basic "broken record" technique. I find that I have to say something two or three times and then from that point forward I ask them ... "what do we do when ..." sort of thing

another challenge is that kids -- up until about age 10/11 (depends upon individual maturity, really) -- are in their own bubble ... this stage of development is marked by this particular pattern, in other words ... kids at this age are almost totally absorbed in their own worlds exploring. You know when the kid literally skis right over your skis and doesn't even blink. hahaha They don't even know you're there.

good luck and have lots of fun.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unhurried_fun
By afternoon I wanted to tell some parents to stop yelling "DO PIZZA" and let the tike experience the fun of a little speed.
I have found the constant parental chatter is more my own inability to shut up when I'm nervous - the trick is to shut up until you expect to be listened to - which is why I am shooting for the one word command approach.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
...kids -- up until about age 10/11 (depends upon individual maturity, really) -- are in their own bubble ...
The only time I intentionally raise my voice is when we are seeing this - Jane was brushing the snow off her boots yesterday while heading straight downhill. She now holds the unofficial 4 yr old land-ski speed record.
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