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Skiing without ski-poles!

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Since I started teaching 10y ago I have pritty much gotten used to skiing without ski-poles. The other day I was skiing with my kidds and got to make a few runs on my own. I didnt even think about getting my ski-poles and didnt really miss them eather.

Anybdy else ever ski without? Do you ever involve skiing without as an exersise in a lesson when you are teaching at higher levels and if you do why?
post #2 of 13
i have a client who took up skiing several years ago and broke her thumb early on. i began teaching her when she made her comeback and to this day she refuses poles. she skis intermediate terrain well. when i ski with her i often ditch the poles.

i think if anyone wants to improve your bump skiing, a run without poles is a great help.

when i do a beginner lesson i ask/urge folks to skip poles on day one. i think it speeds up the learning curve.
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Guy
i have a client who took up skiing several years ago and broke her thumb early on. i began teaching her when she made her comeback and to this day she refuses poles. she skis intermediate terrain well. when i ski with her i often ditch the poles.

i think if anyone wants to improve your bump skiing, a run without poles is a great help.

when i do a beginner lesson i ask/urge folks to skip poles on day one. i think it speeds up the learning curve.
Sounds like she got the most out of braking her thumb. Yes, moguls without ski-poles is challanging. I got funny remarks once when I filmed friends on video in the bumps because I skied better bumps without skipoles and holding the video camera than the movie stars themselves (BTW, they were not great mogul-skiers).

For first timers I allways ditch the skipoles and have them hold their hands on their upper leggs or knees. They need to learn that turning is performed with skis and body movements and not arm rotation and swinging.
post #4 of 13

My theory

My theory is that the point of using ski poles is so instructors don't yell at you for not using them!

A top-level (PSIA III) instructor friend of mine says that poles often get in the way of learning to ski because people feel compelled to do (funny) things with them.

I like the "hands on the leg" idea.

Of course, poles are useful for pushing you along on flats (if you don't know how to skate) or impaling errant snow boarders.
post #5 of 13
I know I use blocking pole plants very effectivily in the bumps ... and waaaay waaaay waaaay too much !!!. I gotta this year make some easy bump runs with no poles so I learn to do more stuff with my feet.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Ski-poles are useful tools out on the mountain. Like njkayaker pointed out you can use them on flats if you dont know how to skate but even if you know how to skate they come in handy. In bumps and difficult snow conditions not to talk about powder and offpist skiing. Used correctly they are also a pleasure to a ski-instructors much abused and strained eye .

Learn2turn mentiones the blocking pole plant and that he overuses it in the moguls. A very typical thing to do but pole plants are infact a vital part of what you look like out on the slope. They tell us way before we can actually see the skier who it is. I myselfe dont like the modern whimpy wrist poleplant adapted from mogul skiing and I totally hate too short poles. They need to be long enough and nowadays with 50-60mm standheight the poles need to be even longer than before.

One very typical misstake with poles is to drag the inside pole behind you in the snow. It is an compensation for inadequete skiing technique. Leaving out the ski poles forces us many times back to square one and the gliding wedge .
post #7 of 13
I don't need no stinkin poles. They very much inhibit upper level learning.
post #8 of 13
I take my poles with me, but I don't really use them much for anything except really steep terrain. Even in moguls, I prefer to just go through them with my poles in the air, using them only for balance.
post #9 of 13
Tdk6,
I take poles away from first timers and second timers if they used poles as first timers--it helps them a lot.
I ski both with or without poles depending on the lesson.
I use a drill for upper level skiers (8's) where we hold our poles to the side with the thumb and indexfinger, wrists bent up with palms facing forward--- This seems to help people get in a better position on the skis and move better through the transition.

RW
post #10 of 13
I have made it standard practice to not have poles in beginner lessons in our ski school. In the past we found them to be a distraction from where the focus needs to be (the feet) and a crutch that inhibited student learning how to balance and use the feet/skis to interact with the snow surface to get around (grip and slip). Initially a few seasoned instructors challenged the idea, but everyone got on board and endorsed the process when they saw how much more quickly beginners learned to balance and get around effectivly using the ski as a tool. They are easy to introduce later when everything is working as it should without them.
post #11 of 13
The downside, as I found this week skiing with my (relatively beginner) girls: when the lift queues are sloped, it's virtually impossible for inexperienced skiers to maintain their balance and place in line without them. In fact, after giving my poles to the girls while waiting in what turned out to be a 45+ minute line, I eventually took off my skis because it was just too much hassle to try to keep from moving!
post #12 of 13

Poles

SSH, A 45 minute lift line. Eek Gads. So far the longest lift line I have been in this year is about 30 secs.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho
SSH, A 45 minute lift line. Eek Gads. So far the longest lift line I have been in this year is about 30 secs.
Ha! Me, too. Until yesterday! :
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