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My thoughts on the 1080s

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I got to try out my new teneighty's last night, and have decided to post what I disliked about them. I am a former skiboarder and I rented skis a few weeks ago and now have a pair of 1080's. I can only compare them to skiboards and some shaped rossignol rental skis I used. They were freshly waxed and were faster than any skiboard I have used and faster then the rentals, but the flex made turns a lot harder, ESPECIALLY on ice:. I found these things to absolutely suck on ice, so I hugged the side of most trails hoping to stay a way from ice. After the night went on I became fully used to the turning, and could turn fine. They seem fine in powder conditions, but the only time I used them in powder is when I hiked 20 ft up a closed trail. Overall I believe I would be better off with all mountain skis, but I am fine with the teneighty's for now.
post #2 of 26
I like my 1080s less and less the more I ski them.

If I weighed 140 pounds and stayed in the park they would be OK but they are not a Northeast all mountain ski.

They do OK in deep snow but as soon as you start speeding up they fold right under you.

I am looking for a better twin.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Actually I am 15 and weigh like 115lbs so maybe that is why i do ok with them.
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kowalski
Actually I am 15 and weigh like 115lbs so maybe that is why i do ok with them.
IF I were to get a pair of all mountain skis mainly for New England what would you suggest?
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kowalski
IF I were to get a pair of all mountain skis mainly for New England what would you suggest?
The K2 Fugativ. I have a 120 pound son on them and he loves them.
post #6 of 26
Just a word of advice- you should probably keep your history of skiboarding a secret.
post #7 of 26
Quote:
you should probably keep your history of skiboarding a secret
Haha... too late, the word is out. I won't get started in this thread though...
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takecontrol618
Just a word of advice- you should probably keep your history of skiboarding a secret.
I just thought it would be good to explain my background in skiing. I didnt think this place was like newschoolers.com :
post #9 of 26

kowalski

every forum has its share of members who tend to be a little blunt, insensitive, even snobby

don't sweat it

with the rain that's falling now in the east, we can look fwd to some good old-fashioned blue stuff in the weeks to come. next time you get skis, make sure they like ice.
post #10 of 26
Kowalski & Scalce -

Send your unwanted 1080s to me and I'll find them good homes with snow conditions they were made for.
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
Kowalski & Scalce -

Send your unwanted 1080s to me and I'll find them good homes with snow conditions they were made for.
I just got to use them again today in terrible conditions because of the rain we got, but they had a park open and thats deffinately what they excel in. So after using them again I decided they are easily tolerable even in the ice/frozen granular conditions. Maybe its my light weight because I can still carve fine, its just harder then the rental skis. I am still thinking about buying another pair of all mountain skis to have. Any suggestions on some cheaper all mountain skis. I found some salomon verse on ebay but i have heard they are for beginners. Any help would be great.
THANKS
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kowalski
I just thought it would be good to explain my background in skiing. I didnt think this place was like newschoolers.com :

haha that newschooler place is a joke
post #13 of 26
Just my opinion of what are some acceptable all mountain skis for the east.
Solomon equipe 10 SC - Great grip, turns faster than light, excellent short-turner very forgiving of mistakes, keep the speeds under 45 mph. Not for heavyweights.

Rossi 9S Oversize (or modern equivalent VS) Also quick short turner with a good grip fairly forgiving, does have a speed limit.

Fischer RX8 - Great at any speed or snow condition, a little more demanding than the two above, but delivers a little more at higher speeds (just my opinion)

Fischer WC SC - like the RX8 only better, stronger, faster. Doesn't like to go under 25 mph though. Feels much better on ice and refrozen crud after two days of rain and freezing rain than the RX8 could ever hope to. Still pretty easy to ski compared to race-tuned racing skis.

Atomic SX11 : Great carving ski, but not as good at short turns as the above, superb in medium radius turns. Likes to go fast.

Elan SX12 Nice smooth solid feeling ski. Likes to turn, has the strenght to move you where you want to go.

Please don't take any of the above into the park. I've heard K2 Public Enemies are good "park" skis for all-mountain skiing.

Happy skiing.
And about those 1080s folding up, learning to ski a not-so-strong ski will help you build your skills.
post #14 of 26

all mtn/park

I'm a bit closer to your position than maybe some of the other people here - I'm 17 and 130 lbs.  I love steeps, carving, and bumps, but being in the mid-atlantic (teaching at wintergreen) I spend alot of time in the park (60% mtn/ 40% park) because it keeps me occupied after skiing the same slope 20 times that day, and getting some air is always fun.  I got new skis this season - and ended up getting 167cm Line Chronics and I love them. I needed the twin tip - I love carving backwards and it helps for teaching. They're great in the park and have a very progressive poppy flex (carbon ollieband) but they're not nearly as flexy as something like the 1080, don't get me wrong they are NOT uber stiff (racing) skis (bad choice if you're 180lbs), but they carve nicely in pretty much anything (especially at my weight, and even more so at yours), and are defenitly stiff enough to hold an edge. They are a bit wider than many skis on the east cost - but they carve fine and it provides that extra stability which is very useful when landing jumps.
post #15 of 26
You need Volkl karmas. Check them out.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kowalski
I got to try out my new teneighty's last night, and have decided to post what I disliked about them. I am a former skiboarder and I rented skis a few weeks ago and now have a pair of 1080's. I can only compare them to skiboards and some shaped rossignol rental skis I used. They were freshly waxed and were faster than any skiboard I have used and faster then the rentals, but the flex made turns a lot harder, ESPECIALLY on ice:. I found these things to absolutely suck on ice, so I hugged the side of most trails hoping to stay a way from ice. After the night went on I became fully used to the turning, and could turn fine. They seem fine in powder conditions, but the only time I used them in powder is when I hiked 20 ft up a closed trail. Overall I believe I would be better off with all mountain skis, but I am fine with the teneighty's for now.
Have I read this right: you only being SKIING for a few weeks, and have deduced that the tools are to blame for your lack of traction on ice?

I suspect that the skiboards have given you good centred balance skills but not necessarily good edging or fore/aft balance ones. At your weight, you might not have noticed it until you stepped on something longer than 100 cm. Bad habits get exacerbated on ice.

For the record, I've skied every iteration of the 1080 since its inception, except the GUN LAB) and found them all completely usable on the east coast. Although not the fastest ski in the pack, they are great multi-purpose tools. Favourite thus far: CR LAB. Stiffer and quicker.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
And about those 1080s folding up, learning to ski a not-so-strong ski will help you build your skills.
Good point! My 15 yr old daughter is 5'5" 115 lbs rips on her 150cm 1080's under all sorts of conditions. She's often faster than most of the people on the hill (including myself) who are on 'better' equipment. It's definitely the user not the tools that make a good skier.
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard
Good point! My 15 yr old daughter is 5'5" 115 lbs rips on her 150cm 1080's under all sorts of conditions. She's often faster than most of the people on the hill (including myself) who are on 'better' equipment. It's definitely the user not the tools that make a good skier.
I'm sorry but there is a big difference between a 115 pound person on a 150 and a 170 pound skier on a 171.

I know many very good skiers who do not like the 1080s because of their instability and lack of edgehold.

I like the 1080s in deep light snow and for messing around in the park or skiing slowly with beginner friends.

They are not good for a run such as Skidder at Sugarloaf on an icey day no matter how good you are at feathering an edge.
post #19 of 26
Taking a ski that's nice and flexible, good in the bumps and on soft snow (and supposedly good in the park; not my thing) and trying to go fast on relatively steep icy hard-pack can be an unpleasant experience, especially for someone that doesn't have a lot of experience.

When I say you can learn a lot on it, I'm not saying it's the best tool for the job; I'm saying learning to adapt to what you have to work with increases your skill set.
post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by warren
Have I read this right: you only being SKIING for a few weeks, and have deduced that the tools are to blame for your lack of traction on ice?
I have skiboarded for 3 years before I switched and the skiboards and the rental skis were far better (TO ME) on ice compared to the 1080's. The switch to skiing from skiboarding wasnt bad, skiboarding is not that much easier (as most people assume). I am not trying to diss the 1080s, I was just comparing them to skiboards and rossignol 150cm rental skis. I was able to ski better on the rental skis then i was on skiboards, and I was a fairly good skiboarder. I am actually starting to like the 1080s, after getting used to the flex. Maybe I a need more experience on ice, but to me the 1080's seemed harder.
post #21 of 26
OK slugger, you should probably just stop now.
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takecontrol618
OK slugger, you should probably just stop now.
I dont get it! I wasnt trying to start a fight. I guess once a skiboarder you might as well just expect to get crap. I was just trying to explain my situation from how I felt when on theses skis compared to the other skis I used, and skiboards. I was just explaining how I felt, I guess a newbie on the forum just cant try to state his opinion, explain his background, and hope for kind and informative replies. Im sorry to those who did give me helpful replies, and thanks.
post #23 of 26

Who is qualified to comment on skis?

He, he, this should get some folks riled up...
I have to agree that judging a ski when you've been skiing for a few weeks is just not possible. It takes years to learn to ski well, to have touch on ice.

I'd like to explore the topic more generally, and perhaps will start a new thread, but I often see people who describe themselves as "intermediate" reviewing and critiquing material. This just seems farfetched to me. An intermediate skier isn't even using the design of the ski. Many self-proclaimed "advanced" skiers aren't either: how many truly good skiers does one see on the hill? Sure, they're getting down double-diamonds ok, but that doesn't mean their technique is any good. (To those who are going to react aggressively to my post, I'm speaking from personal experience, but that's not important)
Any ski by a major (or even minor) ski company was designed by smart people, ski experts I would think, with a particular style, but they're all good. Of course they're different, and that's why it's fun to try different skis and read reviews. I would propose that only a very small group of people are really qualified to analyze these matters and proclaim judgement on skis.
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Yeah, that was a very long but informative post, I guess I just blew my temper. I think it was the skiboarding thing that got me riled up. I would consider myself a intermediate skier (well a 7-8 on the aspen snowmass skill level thing), so I guess I must sound kind of like a fool trying to review a ski.
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kowalski
Yeah, that was a very long but informative post, I guess I just blew my temper. I think it was the skiboarding thing that got me riled up. I would consider myself a intermediate skier (well a 7-8 on the aspen snowmass skill level thing), so I guess I must sound kind of like a fool trying to review a ski.
Kowalski,
You are not a fool in trying to express your opinion or experience with a ski-after all what's a forum for? My post wasn't directed at you, but just a general observation. So sorry if it sounded like I was ranking on you. The problem with forums and email is it's so easy to sound pissy and critical.
Keep skiing and have fun.
post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by squawbomber
The problem with forums and email is it's so easy to sound pissy and critical.
Keep skiing and have fun.
Very good point, and I think your right about just to keep skiing and having fun.
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