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What qualifies as "the steeps"? - Page 2

post #31 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gill
I use the sphincter gauge. The more it tightens up, the steeper the slope is considered.
And what kind of tool to you use to measure that factor? Wait, nevermind, I don't really want to know. :
post #32 of 95
I am looking at Kirkwood here, and one said that the one man chute is steep. My recollection is that it is narrow, but not necessarily steep. The first 200 feet or so off the lift of "The Wall" is much steeper.



http://www.kirkwood.com/winter/images/trailguide.jpg
post #33 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho
LeeLau said it Right! Steep: (In no special order)

KT22 North Side-Squaw
Headwall-Squaw
Ridge-Sugar Bowl
Chutes-Mt Rose
Scotts Run-Alpine Meadows
One man Chute - Kirkwood
Gunbarrel-Heavenly
None of these are steep.

Steep is like "Little Jim's" at K-Wood, or Fingers at KT-22, etc. Oh yeah, that little chute skiers left of Our Father at Alpine was pretty steep too.
post #34 of 95
steep = can't ski "in the front seat" straight down the fall line without doing a summersault over the tips.

Steeper than steep = no matter how far "laid back" in the back seat I am, I am only able to go straight down the fall line for a couple of ski lengths before preventative action must be taken.
post #35 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
steep = can't ski "in the front seat" straight down the fall line without doing a summersault over the tips.

Steeper than steep = no matter how far "laid back" in the back seat I am, I am only able to go straight down the fall line for a couple of ski lengths before preventative action must be taken.
?????
post #36 of 95
Any shot that the snow falls with you on each turn=steep
post #37 of 95
Something that's beyond your own capability. Steep to me was CPR ridge, Glory, and Feuz bowl at Kicking Horse. That was MY steep. Aceman
post #38 of 95
Jed Peters: None of these are steep.

Note to self: never ski with Jed Peters.
post #39 of 95

Welll

Anything that I slide for 200 feet after I fall is steep .. I have skiied only in NE and White Nitro at Sugarloaf is the steepest I have skiied. Its supposed to be the steepest lift serviced ski slope in NE or something like that. I am pretty sure its wussy boy stuff to the back-country and chute skiiers.
-AJ.
post #40 of 95

What is Steep

Dave SSS, yep Gunbarrel isn't that steep unless it is your lst time down and you are looking at VW size icy moguls and when you look down the hill it goes forever and Harrahs Hotel/Casino looks like a postage stamp-doesn't matter what the degree is - its a long way down. Double Diamonds-too too many times I've been told "I only ski doub le diamonds" and probably 80 percent of the time that means they're an upper intermediate skier. Its a PR and martketing trick.
post #41 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jed Peters
?????
Ok. I'll explain, and since I've had an extra day to think about it I will improve. Please bear in mind that I haven't been on steeps with the new "shaped" skis.

Steep = I have to make a conscious effort to get forward so my front edges will have enough weight on them.

Steeper = I have to keep my weight back because If I'm forward, a line drawn straight down through my centre of mass(representing the gravity force vector) will not go through my base of support (skis), but will go above my tips. A free-body diagram will show that the net forces and application points will cause me to rotate down the hill over my skis. Moving further back puts me back into a stable position.

Steepest = I cannot move back far enough to stop from rotating over my ski tips, but I can tolerate this unstable position for a short time, before I'm actually past the point of no return. I have to have my skis sideways to the fall line in order to get close enough to the hill not to start tumbling. A rough calculation puts this steepest slope at about 80 degrees, but I could be off.

I have found steeper slopes generally the most efficient in generating speed.
post #42 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jed Peters
?????
Ok. I'll explain, and since I've had an extra day to think about it I will improve. Please bear in mind that I haven't been on steeps with the new "shaped" skis.

Steep = I have to make a conscious effort to get forward so my front edges will have enough weight on them.

Steeper = I have to keep my weight back because If I'm forward, a line drawn straight down through my centre of mass(representing the gravity force vector) will not go through my base of support (skis), but will go above my tips. A free-body diagram will show that the net forces and application points will cause me to rotate down the hill over my skis. Moving further back puts me back into a stable position.

Steepest = I cannot move back far enough to stop from rotating over my ski tips, but I can tolerate this unstable position for a short time, before I'm actually past the point of no return. I have to have my skis sideways to the fall line in order to get close enough to the hill not to start tumbling. A rough calculation puts this steepest slope at about 80 degrees, but I could be off.

I have found steeper slopes generally the most efficient in generating speed.
post #43 of 95
Echo?
post #44 of 95
steeps = stuff they have to chuck bombs at every time it snows?
Anything steepish makes my guts shrivel and my toes go all tickely, like just before you crash on skates. If it's really steep and very smooth, I freeze up! Powder or bumps are OK though.
post #45 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman
Echo?
Sympatico.......Cannot find server.....
post #46 of 95
my 2 cents. it must be marked double black diamond at least. Preferably there is a sign that says "Warning, experts only, you may slide to the bottom if you fall", is usually laden with wind swept rocks, icy spots, NEVER EVER groomed, might be through some trees, usually has a 4 foot wide gate at the top to get to it if its even in bounds at all. Anything less should not be referred to as "the Steeps".....that's disrespectful to true steeps.

Of course there are some people that will take it even further and say it must be something that you hike to and have to drop off a cornice or slide in on some hairy single track ledge that drops you in to a skinny colouire for at least 1000 vertical feet.

But please..if you're talking about a named, groomed run that simply has a big sign in the trees to the right of the run saying Black diamond...I don't care how many degrees that is...that is simply a steep resort managed ski run. Not "Steeps"
post #47 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
steep = can't ski "in the front seat" straight down the fall line without doing a summersault over the tips.

Steeper than steep = no matter how far "laid back" in the back seat I am, I am only able to go straight down the fall line for a couple of ski lengths before preventative action must be taken.

If it can be skied in the backseat has nothing to do with steep.
post #48 of 95
Oldschool,
I thought my reply to Jed made it clear, but I guess it didn't. I will try one last time.

The friction force acts upslope on your ski bottoms
The Normal force acts Normal to the ski slope.
The weight force acts Down.
These forces are applied at different distances from your CM.

As you increase the slope angle, you will reach a point where the net torque provided by all of these forces together causes you to rotate forwards over your ski tips when they are pointing straight down the hill. Even if you deliberately ski "in the back seat" you will not be able to get your cm into a position that will prevent the rotation.
post #49 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool

If it can be skied in the backseat has nothing to do with steep.
Exactly!
Ghost is apparently confused about what "backseat" means. Probably he listened to some confused instructor who told him to get perpendicular to the hill.

BK
post #50 of 95

Tucks?

Is Tuckermans head wall "steep"?

Eastern skiers pipe in!

CalG
post #51 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy
Is Tuckermans head wall "steep"?

Eastern skiers pipe in!

CalG
The headwall is steep. I've been told that it is equal to the angle of repose of snow, so that's about as steep as you can get. it's the steepest place I've ever skied.
Of course, now that I've said it, someone will respond that it is not steep.

BK
post #52 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer
Exactly!
Ghost is apparently confused about what "backseat" means. Probably he listened to some confused instructor who told him to get perpendicular to the hill.

BK
I know what back seat means.
post #53 of 95
After you've made a couple of turns, you stop to plan your next few and feel something touching your uphill shoulder.
post #54 of 95
BK

It's Steep!

CalG
post #55 of 95
To me, steep means "live or die time".
post #56 of 95
If you think twice about taking the line, it is steep. The Starr and Goat get me thinksing everytime, but it is so worth it.
post #57 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by dewdman42
my 2 cents. it must be marked double black diamond at least. Preferably there is a sign that says "Warning, experts only, you may slide to the bottom if you fall", is usually laden with wind swept rocks, icy spots, NEVER EVER groomed, might be through some trees, usually has a 4 foot wide gate at the top to get to it if its even in bounds at all. Anything less should not be referred to as "the Steeps".....that's disrespectful to true steeps.
That would seem to fit the bill for Tower 3 Chute at JH, as well as the Expert Chutes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dewdman42
Of course there are some people that will take it even further and say it must be something that you hike to and have to drop off a cornice or slide in on some hairy single track ledge that drops you in to a skinny colouire for at least 1000 vertical feet.
Zero G in Rock Springs Bowl
Corbetts
Hourglass Coulair
post #58 of 95

Headwall at Tucks is steep.

It is almost difficult to come to a stop and hold your position on it. You can touch the slope by just extending your arm out. I can't imagine how snow could hold on anything steeper.

The thing with Tuckerman's is that the snow gets blown in from above and just packs in. If you've ever seen it with no snow, it's hard to imagine how it could ever get covered with snow. The snow is 50-100 feet deep in places.
post #59 of 95
Ski up to any "steep" slope. If more people are looking at it, than skiing it, its probably steep. If they are backing away and leaving, its very steep.

If there is avy debris in the runout or apron, its probably steep.

Rock outcrops and walls are a dead give-away something is steep.

If you are skiing, but not touching the ground, you are probably on a steep slope.

Carving is not a really steep technique, but you may think you are carving.

Similarly there is no slow line to take fast, if the the slope is really steep.

When your slough outruns you, and continues out of sight, its steep. (for some, the presence of slough, is sufficient evidence).

When all else fails pull out your inclinometer. If you think, gee, I thought this was steeper than 40 degrees, its probably steep enough

The best reason to ski steep slopes is, its easy to stand up if you fall..........assuming you can stop.
post #60 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
Ski up to any "steep" slope. If more people are looking at it, than skiing it, its probably steep. If they are backing away and leaving, its very steep.

If there is avy debris in the runout or apron, its probably steep.

Rock outcrops and walls are a dead give-away something is steep.

If you are skiing, but not touching the ground, you are probably on a steep slope.

Carving is not a really steep technique, but you may think you are carving.

Similarly there is no slow line to take fast, if the the slope is really steep.

When your slough outruns you, and continues out of sight, its steep. (for some, the presence of slough, is sufficient evidence).

When all else fails pull out your inclinometer. If you think, gee, I thought this was steeper than 40 degrees, its probably steep enough

The best reason to ski steep slopes is, its easy to stand up if you fall..........assuming you can stop.
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