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curling my toes

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone Merry Christmas. Well I got out to my local hill last week on my new 8000 . Felt good the only negative comment would be, they felt like they were pushed around abit more than my old 184 XX skis. One day I will take them both to the hill and do my own test comparison. More to the point of this thread. While skiing quite hard on either ski at some point I notice my toes are curled as if holding on to a bar. I then relax them and continue skiing. I take notice of this as I am skiing agressivelly and fast. Question then, am I doing something wrong, is this natural, are my boots to loose. Any observations would be welcome.
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKINUT59
Hello everyone Merry Christmas. Well I got out to my local hill last week on my new 8000 . Felt good the only negative comment would be, they felt like they were pushed around abit more than my old 184 XX skis. One day I will take them both to the hill and do my own test comparison. More to the point of this thread. While skiing quite hard on either ski at some point I notice my toes are curled as if holding on to a bar. I then relax them and continue skiing. I take notice of this as I am skiing agressivelly and fast. Question then, am I doing something wrong, is this natural, are my boots to loose. Any observations would be welcome.
Two distinct possibilites come to mind. One, the boots are to loose in the heels. You can tighten them up with a heel lift under the footbed but inside the liner. Or, your bindings are mounted or adjusted to far to the tail of the ski. This makes it hard to get over the sweet spot and you curl your toes to get there.
post #3 of 15
This is the same sensation I was describing in another thread about "hanging on to the inside of the boot with my toes".
post #4 of 15
I found when i was curling toes i was scared and tried to dig in to slow down. Not a size issue... a fear issue..i only did on steeps..let go of the fear and all will be right in the world:
post #5 of 15
I would say barring the equipment issues mentioned before, it's probably a mental issue. Our tendancy is to want to control every nuance of skiing, which usually ends up hurting us in the long run. You were feeling a difference in the way the skis performed and were unintentionally trying to force them to react in a manner that you have come to expect.

Without seeing you ski, I would say that you should examine your stance and balance to make sure you are skiing efficiently. Then, on moderate to easy terrain, rip a variety of arcs with various stances to find the sweet spot on that particular ski. Are you too far forward/back/narrow/wide? Then progressively work into more challenging terrain. If you feel your toes curling, back off a bit and see what variables changed.

I ski a lot with my boots unbuckled to find my center on a given ski.
post #6 of 15
ontologically speaking we humans have grasping ability inherent in our feet. just because we have toes that are shorter proportionally than our fingers, it doesn't mean we can't use our feet like hands. remember Christy Brown ("My Left Foot")? you can pick up things with your feet if you try, really!

it is a human tendency to want to grasp something when a feeling of slipping, sliding, falling, losing traction, etc. arises. some of us can sense a rather involuntary "grasping" by the foot/feet when we get into icy terrain or other terrain that causes that feeling of diminished control.

a well-made footbed that provides proper support for your foot will go a long way to eliminating the "grasping". from my experience, it seems this is because the stable underfoot platform allows the foot to relax more.
post #7 of 15
I have also found that intentionally flexing and relaxing the toes before starting out helps, as does a concentration on flexing my ankles and keeping my weight even along my foot. There have been a couple of threads on this in the past, including this ancient one that I started.
post #8 of 15
This is a common, unconscious reaction to feeling unbalanced. Many of my fitness students tell me that they have stopped doing this when they gained better core stability and proprioception. You can warm up your feet by trying a toe arpeggio. Start with your big toe, and lift one toe at a time. Then return from the pinky toe. Next, start with the pinky toe. Do this about four times, then try your other foot. Warning: Easier said than done, but even attempting it is helpful. No need to do it perfectly! Off to ski!
post #9 of 15
Thanks for this thread skinut. I've had this issue too, but had never really heard it from others or maybe I just couldn't communicate it well enough to find out.
post #10 of 15
Both my Mom and I do this at the begining of the season. I just tense and relax my feet a few times and it usually goes away. I didn't know anybody else did that.
post #11 of 15
I used to curl my toes in my old boots that were slightly too big.

My new boots fit much better and I do not curl my toes anymore.

It's really hard to pressure the tips of the skis properly when you curl and it's very annoying.
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Wow , you people are great outhere.I have read all the replys and remember a few points. My new 8000 are 176 mounted according to the dimple on the skis. I could remount if that was the issue (I dont know yet ). I am ble to relax my toes as I ski,when I do this ,I then seem to feel more even presure downward through the whole bottom of myfoot onto the ski.I belive this last observation may mean I move from the back of my skis to over the middle or the sweat spot of the ski. I have not had custom footbeds made I ski only up to 10 days a season. Will try better of the rack footbeds,I could see that helping. The more I remember the sensation it seems thatas I catch myself relaxing my toes I feel that I am pushing down with my shines into the turn rather than with my "seat". Thank you all again for your replys and any more that may come. SNOW SNOW SNOW.
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Please excuse my spelling and typing, I will make greater effort to do it right next time.
post #14 of 15
Are you skiing on the balls of your feet? That's where your balance needs to be. You don't want your shins pressing against your boot tongues most of the time, and you don't want your weight on your heels.

Quote:
One, the boots are to loose in the heels. You can tighten them up with a heel lift under the footbed but inside the liner.
Be careful about boot mods. A heel lift is usually not a good thing. It may make the lower legs angle more forward, and the skier has to stick their butt back to balance. The heel lift does help a small number of people, but isn't benign.

If the boots aren't very snug and a very good conductor of leg motion to the skis, visit a good bootfitter. A bootfitter can't do a lot to make too-big boots work well, but can make slightly small boots fit. Here's what a bootfitter can do:
http://www.gmolfoot.com/performance.html
http://www.gmolfoot.com/balance.html
http://www.gmolfoot.com/jeanne.html
http://www.gmolfoot.com/footbeds.html

I feel that proper bootfitting is yields the most skiing improvement for the money of anything I've bought.


Ken
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
I do not ski against the tounge of the boot all the time just as I push down and forward to start the turn,then I ease up and try to stay centered on my feet. This will be an ongoing investigation and maybe a lesson from the top instructor at Blue Mountain. I will get some new footbeds this year. This is a study I do not mind following up on. Thanks again for everyones feed back.
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