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SL skis

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I need some advice on SL racestock and consumer skis. I would like to get a ski which is good freeskiing choice. I have many, many choices but some skis are a lot easier for me to get. All skis should be 155. I would like the ski to have a softer flex (longitudinally).
I am looking at:
Volkl Racetiger SL WC (i can get easier)
Volkl Racetiger SL retail (i can get easier)
Rossignol 9S WC (i can get easier)
Rossignol 9S Oversize (i can get easier)
Elan SLX (retail)
Nordica Dobermann Pro sl xbs alu
Nordica Dobermann SLR (not on my list, thanks Heluva)
Atomic SL11 WC
Atomic ST11 (softer flex?)
Atomic SL11m

I am very interested in the Atomics.

Thanks a lot!

Jamie
post #2 of 18
I purchased the Head i.SL Chip for almost exactly the same purpose. Love it.

Pretty soft flex longitudinally but stiffens laterally based on the load. Stable at speed, yet capable of being skied slowly.
post #3 of 18
You listed some great skis. I think that any of them could be a winner for you. Why 155? Are you female? The reason I ask is because I just switched to 165's and I will never go back. They are sooooooo stable and offer speed and edgehold well above the performance of a 155cm SL ski.

Race Stock:
As far as the skis go, I have heard that the Rossi this year is VERY stiff, but I could be entirely wrong. If it is the same as last year, it is a noodle and will be perfect for what youre looking for. The Volkl is in the same category, but it will require much more input from the user. They still ski very fast and very smooth though. They will have more rebound than the Rossi (assuming last years Rossi). You don't want an SL:11 WC - it is in the same category as the Nordica SLR - probably at a higher level.

Retail:
The best retail ski that you have selected, and the best ski for what you're looking for overall is the Elan SLX Fusion (formerly SX Pro). I have skied on my brothers and they are possibly the easiest, smoothest, fastest, easiest, best edgehold, snappiest, easiest (did I mention they are easy?) ski in the bunch. They have edgehold similar to a stock ski, and rebound similar to a stock ski, but everything is tamed down to something more managable for normal humans. They are crazy stiff, but due to the HUGE sidecut, bending them is effortless. Short turns are a no brainer. Rebound is less than a normal race stock ski, but only due to the stuff they put on the top of the ski to settle it down - I suspect that the innards of the ski closely resemble my race stock boards from Elan. They do no thave a speed limit, but I sensed that you can push them to a point where they will stop giving you unlimited rebound... although that point is probably far beyond most skiers capabilities... I didn't find it, but I could feel that it might be there (like I was skiing it on the edge of its capabilities). The SL:11m is also a great ski, but I skied it last year a few times (160cm) and nothing really impressed me. It was okay, but didn't really do anything special. I suspect this is also the case for the slightly softer ST:11. Both the ST and SL are soft skis in my opinion.

Later

GREG
post #4 of 18
Look at the Head i.SL RD. I've had about 4 days on mine now, and I'm loving them. For a racestock ski they're quite versatile. They're certainly stiff, but they have a good smooth flex, so it's not really an impediment. Exceptional edgehold, and you can get them over on edge as far as you're capable of, they won't let you down. They're available in 156, 161, and 166. The 161 is a great length IMO, you get a little more stability than a 155/156, but you don't have to go with the more demanding 166.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input guys. I am a male skier, i weigh only 155lbs. My current ski is the Volkl P50 SL WC (165) and i feel it is quite stiff. I want a ski i can bend more (and more forgiving if possible). This is why i was looking at 155 (at least for the racestock boards). I guess 160 or 165 would be better for me. Only a few times i was caught in the back seat. so this is not a problem for me. But with a 155, who knows?

I will definitely check out the Heads. I am open to any suggestions you might have.

Heluva, i looks at the Elan SLX Fusion Pro. It looks very good. Sidecut: 160: 114-66-104
165: 116-66-106
There is one thing i would like to ask you. You said it is very stiff, but it can be bent easily b/c of its sidecut. Could you explain how it works? I can bend my stiff Volkls but not as much as i would like.
What binding system does it use? I hope you can tell me more about this ski.
post #6 of 18
I second the 165 recommendation. Your P50s are from a time when 155s were made for men. 155s now are made for women, with 165s just as easy to ski as an older 155 but with increased grip, stability and ability to control the rebound.

A good ski for you would probably be last year's Rossi 165 WC. They are extremely easy and ski beautifully. They're extremely smooth and feel like the entire edge is glued to the snow. My dad has last year's Rossi Oversize 165 and I find them to be nothing special. They don't have too much energy and just sort of plod along...not super quick.

I have not tried any of the Racetigers but I currently ski on last year's P60 165 race stock. This is another ski that might be worth considering, although it seems to like to go straight and fast more than the Rossis, a somewhat sacry feeling when you first get on them. They tend to lock into the turn more than a Rossi.

You should also consider the Salomon LAB ski. It is one of the softer slaloms and I have heard great things.
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C)
I second the 165 recommendation. Your P50s are from a time when 155s were made for men. 155s now are made for women, with 165s just as easy to ski as an older 155 but with increased grip, stability and ability to control the rebound.

A good ski for you would probably be last year's Rossi 165 WC. They are extremely easy and ski beautifully. They're extremely smooth and feel like the entire edge is glued to the snow. My dad has last year's Rossi Oversize 165 and I find them to be nothing special. They don't have too much energy and just sort of plod along...not super quick.

I have not tried any of the Racetigers but I currently ski on last year's P60 165 race stock. This is another ski that might be worth considering, although it seems to like to go straight and fast more than the Rossis, a somewhat sacry feeling when you first get on them. They tend to lock into the turn more than a Rossi.

You should also consider the Salomon LAB ski. It is one of the softer slaloms and I have heard great things.
Thanks for your input.
Did you ski this year's Rossi 165 WC? If no, is there anything you can tell me about it? I already knew it is stiffer, but i do not know if they are a lot stiffer or not. It seems nobody skied them.

I did not include the Salomons b/c they are very hard to get. For me it would be almost impossible to get them.

I have a question about the Rossi WC skis. Is the factory tune good or not? Are the Rossis skiable with their factory tune? Did you ski last year's version with the factory tune?
I have to say i skied my Volkls with the factory tune. This may have been a bad thing. it worked well for me.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sywsyw
Thanks for your input.
Did you ski this year's Rossi 165 WC? If no, is there anything you can tell me about it? I already knew it is stiffer, but i do not know if they are a lot stiffer or not. It seems nobody skied them.

I did not include the Salomons b/c they are very hard to get. For me it would be almost impossible to get them.

I have a question about the Rossi WC skis. Is the factory tune good or not? Are the Rossis skiable with their factory tune? Did you ski last year's version with the factory tune?
I have to say i skied my Volkls with the factory tune. This may have been a bad thing. it worked well for me.
I have no idea about this year's 9S WC. Off the shelf they feel extremely stiff but I know no one who has skied them.

I did not ski the rossis with the factory tune, so I can't really answer...
post #9 of 18
I just bought some sl:11 and they rip I love them...enough said ..I couldnt be any more satisfied
post #10 of 18
Say you have two equally stiff (longitudinally) skis. You flex them in the shop/lodge and they seem equal. Both skis are 165cm. One has a turning radius of 14m, while the other is 12 or less. In order to get the same turn shape out of both skis, you will have to flex the 14m ski a lot. Due to its stiffness the 14m ski will feel like MUCH more ski just because you have to bend the ski by your own initiative, versus having a huge sidecut that will compress to the snow as soon as you put it on edge. Think about the extra input you need to add to the skis to get the same turns out of the 14m ski. It is a big difference. I did this with skiing an SLR back to back with the SX/SLX Fusion (btw, which has a Tyrolia Fusion Pro interface - my brother who is a Salomon freak, seems to enjoy it a lot and has had no trouble).

Based on your length comments, I would encourage you to stick with 165's, and just look for a softer ski. I am just slightly heavier than you are and I will never go back to a 155. They are fun, but the slightly longer ski offers so much more performance. I now realize why most men on the WC never did ski a 155 when those were the rules. An ideal eastern free ski slalom for me would be the Rossignol 9S WC (last years) and the Elan SLX Fusion Pro. The Salomon's that were mentioned were very soft a few years back but I have heard that they beefed things up - especially for the male skiers. Most skiers/racers I know will ski the factory base tune initially, but will hand tune the skis before they ever use them. Typically I will ski the early season on the factory base structure, and then have them redone around the end of January, where they will get a full prep.

Later

GREG
post #11 of 18
I have an extra pair of SX Pro's in 160 laying around unmounted (they are non-fusion) as well as unmounted Head i-SL RD's in 166 (I also have an unskied pair in 161, but they have been drilled), if you want to pick up something relatively cheap. Greg is right about the ability of those skis: the SX Pro/Fusion's are some of the best real, but not racestock skis out there, and the Head is slightly heavier in feel and very powerful.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching
I have an extra pair of SX Pro's in 160 laying around unmounted (they are non-fusion) as well as unmounted Head i-SL RD's in 166 (I also have an unskied pair in 161, but they have been drilled), if you want to pick up something relatively cheap. Greg is right about the ability of those skis: the SX Pro/Fusion's are some of the best real, but not racestock skis out there, and the Head is slightly heavier in feel and very powerful.
Thanks dawg.

A friend of mine told me that next year, Rossi is going to change the current race skis. He told me it is not going to be a simple graphics change. I cannot confirm it yet. I am going to wait for the 2006 SIA Trade Show to see if there are new skis on offer (am not talking about a minor graphics change here).

I can always get this year's models (or last year's). I just want to see if there is something new worth waiting for. If there is nothing new, i will try to get a very good deal on an SL ski.
post #13 of 18
Couple of guys on the team are on this year's Rossis (they just got them) and it seems like they are stiffer, but very much like the old Rossis: do not feel like a lot of ski, great out of the course, not all that hot in the course.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffr
Couple of guys on the team are on this year's Rossis (they just got them) and it seems like they are stiffer, but very much like the old Rossis: do not feel like a lot of ski, great out of the course, not all that hot in the course.
Thanks for the input. That's exactly what i need. The Rossi 9S WC would be my first racestock ski choice. But i don't think i am going to get the '06 model. I am going to wait to see if Rossi changes the '07 model.

Meanwhile, i am open to any suggestions/comments you might have.
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
I have one more question. What plates do you guys recommend if i get the ski flat? The Volkl SL WC is flat, so i can mount any plate i want. The Rossi on the other hand comes with a plate.

What options do i have? I am looking for a soft (but top of the line) plate.

Is the Marker Piston control SL plate a soft plate or not? I have been using this plate on my Volkls but i don't know if it is stiff or soft.

I have also been looking at some Vist plates, but i don't know what models are softer.
I do not race so i do not have to worry about the height of the whole setup.

Thanks again,
Jamie
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sywsyw
I have one more question. What plates do you guys recommend if i get the ski flat? The Volkl SL WC is flat, so i can mount any plate i want. The Rossi on the other hand comes with a plate.

What options do i have? I am looking for a soft (but top of the line) plate.

Is the Marker Piston control SL plate a soft plate or not? I have been using this plate on my Volkls but i don't know if it is stiff or soft.

I have also been looking at some Vist plates, but i don't know what models are softer.
I do not race so i do not have to worry about the height of the whole setup.

Thanks again,
Jamie
I think the Piston plate is softer than the Vist plate. I you want softer you could go with the Salomon Poweraxe SL from a couple years back or the older Rossi all-plastic plate that came on the T-Power 9S's a while back.
post #17 of 18
Pistons are a pretty soft plate, as they are mostly plastic. The older rossi plate, while soft isn't that great when it comes to offering free flex. The Salomon plate is pretty good. I use it currently on my Nordicas. I liked the VIST WC AIR plate tht was on my Nordicas last year though too. It seems much softer than the WC Race, and offered a really smooth ride. It kind of sucks for free skiing unless you really work the ski though. Luckily last years ski was soft, so I am able to get around the plate's soft snow shortcomings.

BTW, with that in mind, last years Nordica SLR might not be a bad choice. It takes focus to ski (forward like this years model) but you don't need the power or precision. They seem to ski more like a GS ski than a slalom ski, because they lack the rebound that a slalom usually packs in its punch.

Later

GREG
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thank you for your input. I will continue to use the Marker Piston Control SL plate.
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