or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How often do you break while on the trail
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How often do you break while on the trail - Page 2

post #31 of 72
Stop is a four letter word!
post #32 of 72
hell the only reasons i stop r

1. straving 2 death
2. *other people ...hehe
3. have 2 go 2 the bathroom
4. the lifts stop
5. there is no snow
6. mountain closes
7. thirst


ya....i can ski for forever
post #33 of 72
Whenever I see two cute women stopped by a trail marker looking confused... that's when I stop.
post #34 of 72
I sometimes count how many turns I can make in the bumps without stopping. 25 is a lot for me.
post #35 of 72

Filling in the time with non-sense.

Sorry, but I find this thread rather ridiculous. Why do you want to know what others state they are doing on the mountain? When you ski you can see them. Second, taking breaks depends on so many factors that it would be stupid to use the answers here to determine what you are going to do. I break when I feel the need to break. I do hope others do the same.
post #36 of 72
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot AT

But I am finding the responses to be helpful. You know you could go start your own thread and seek information that may be of interest to you.

The reason I asked is because of the experience I had at Killington skiing with the two guys I mentioned earlier. The nature of this tread for me is about conditioning. Nearly every response indicates that they do not take short breaks on the trail. What this means to me, is that most of these skiers run top to bottom. In the bumps I find that hard to believe, but one of the guys I was with did not stop on Outer Limits. I was impressed.

I often wonder what would happen to me at a place like Jackson Hole. I used to live at Whistler, but the vertical I skied was at the top and short.

If I skied with those two I think my conditioning would improve.
post #37 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskinow
Just wondering how often people stop to take a short break while on the trail they are skiing. I met some nice guys today and we skied hard, but they did not stop! Now I can hardly walk.

Do you stop and how often.
Stopping on a trail scares me--too many out-of-control people--so we avoid trails as much as possible, and when we HAVE to be on them, we try not to stop till it feels safe! Skiing in the trees means making sure you haven't lost your partner(s), so we'll stop fairly often. Besides, it's a peaceful feeling to listen to the quietness of a snow-covered mountain and trees. Same "stopping rules" apply in the backcountry.

We are no longer as young as we want to think we are. : Fortunately, adding gym workouts to our usual array of year-round outdoor recreational activities now means that "screaming body parts" rarely dictate when, where and why we stop. It just took us a few years to figure out it was time to start working out in the gym.

Thatsagirl
post #38 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thatsagirl
Stopping on a trail scares me--too many out-of-control people--so we avoid trails as much as possible, and when we HAVE to be on them, we try not to stop till it feels safe! Skiing in the trees means making sure you haven't lost your partner(s), so we'll stop fairly often. Besides, it's a peaceful feeling to listen to the quietness of a snow-covered mountain and trees. Same "stopping rules" apply in the backcountry.

We are no longer as young as we want to think we are. : Fortunately, adding gym workouts to our usual array of year-round outdoor recreational activities now means that "screaming body parts" rarely dictate when, where and why we stop. It just took us a few years to figure out it was time to start working out in the gym.

Thatsagirl
Roger That. Conditioning your body is the key to top to bottom endurance, all day long. Bumps, trees, groomers, whatever the case, if you are an out of shape couch potato weekend warrior and skiing any sort of decent vertical you might as well take a run and hit the bar. Plus you will probably feel more at home on your bar stool and less chance for injury

P.S. I am still as young as I tink I am
post #39 of 72
I'm an older, out of shape, mom. I say out of shape because if I climb up hill, I stop a lot. That being said, if I'm skiing alone I rarely stop on the way down the hill unless it's to inspect a previously unskied run to see what kind of shape it's in. If I am skiing with someone, it depends on if I'm following or leading and if I'm leading and they're a bit back I stop to make sure they know which way I went. Other than that, I stop for lunch.
post #40 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
P.S. I am still as young as I tink I am
Enjoy it while you can! One day you'll wake up and it'll hit you like a ton of bricks! And us old folks promise not to say, "I told you so!" Well, maaa-aybe we won't say it...

Thatsagirl
post #41 of 72
Heck! I had to stop to take a break half way through reading this thread!

I ski in Michigan so I'm not privelaged enough to ski the long runs you do.

You people are amazing! I only hope I'll be able to perform half as well when I take my trip west this winter.

I'll let you know how baddly you can laugh at me when I do it!
post #42 of 72
I'm surprised with the responses to this thread that no one has taken the time to address the causes of over fatigue and to give this gentleman a solution. I'm a fifty year old skier that runs as hard on the mountain as the teenagers behind me. I was having trouble up until this year with over fatigue. The solution to the problem came to me in two areas. first I had to work hard and condtion my body. I built myself up to running eight miles a week and also work out on a trampoline. Secondly and probably the most important is I have been working hard at understanding and improving my turns and using my skis as tools instead of muscling them down the moutain. I studied old school carving technics which were developed with endurance in mind and started to apply them. Skiers that have really mastered solid carving technic experience very little leg fatigue. Now when my legs start burning I pay attention to my stance and weight transfer. Usually my fatigue is caused by old habits creaping back. I make a few adjustments and I'm good to go. Anyone that is having alot of problems with fatigue needs to look at there technic. There is plenty of old farts that ski like teenagers and it's not because ther'e super human. They only ski better.
post #43 of 72
When skiing with the wife and/or slow friends, it seems like we stop WAY too often. When skiing with the hardcore buddies, we NEVER stop. We're off the lift, decide which lift to meet at and we're off.

A couple of years ago, we had a very hardcore day. Literally no stopping at all. It was an awesome @ Mammoth. Got home and I had this rash on my back. My back was also killing me. I thought I over did it. It turns out that I had shingles! I'm still not quite sure what caused it, but my doctor thinks it could've been fatigue from that hardcore day.

We still have hardcore days, but I try to keep it somewhat under control.
post #44 of 72
It Depends :

1. Skiing with my ski buds and adult children = yo -yo skiing !!@warpspeed/top to bottom , take no prisoners stop only for a 20 min lunch /pee break : then repeat process till closing

2. Skiing with the Queen of the Hop and her friends repeat process #1 above but reduce speed to cruising level reduce testosterone level

3. taking the 2 grandboyz and the 2 little "JV "Queens stopping as often as necessary --make sure we play intersting ski games , take Hot chocy breaks ON DEMAND ----------- making memories-----PRICELESS !!!!
post #45 of 72
I got shingles one summer- due to exhaustion and stress- worked 5 16 hour days in a row landscaping, then "entertained" my girlfriend for a few more hours afterward. By the end of the week I couldnt see straight.

I stop whenever I get remotely tired. I am 24 years old, in great shape (or so I thought before skiing this year), just not in "ski shape". I think who you ski with influences your mind too, so it may be more of a mind over matter mentality. You dont stop with your buddies, but isnt it sorta a relief when you "have to" stop to wait for your wife or other slower skier-NOT ALL WIVES ARE SLOWER. I always appreciate the excuse that I "had" to stop for them (Of course sometimes we really have to stop) when Im huffing and buffing after skiing bumps or ungroomed terrain in general.
post #46 of 72
If you start doing plyometrics a month or two before ski season (getting in the squat rack doesn't hurt either), you don't have much to worry about. I'll echo what others have said. If I'm skiing with someone not quite as comfortable with speed, I'll stop every so often to avoid losing each other. If I'm flying solo, I'll stop when I get to the lift line! I typically don't put in a full 8 hour day though. 5 or 6 hours of high intensity skiing is all I can take. Of course, that's also in lower altitude areas like Tahoe.
post #47 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceDaddy
I'm surprised with the responses to this thread that no one has taken the time to address the causes of over fatigue and to give this gentleman a solution. I'm a fifty year old skier that runs as hard on the mountain as the teenagers behind me. I was having trouble up until this year with over fatigue. The solution to the problem came to me in two areas. first I had to work hard and condition my body.
Several of us suggested working out at the gym/conditioning your body. But you're right, we didn't go into details like you did. Everyone needs different workouts, so I suggest speaking to a trainer to find out what you need to work on and what program will help you achieve your goals.

Thatsagirl
post #48 of 72

variablility

Here are some things to consider that greatly influence physical need to stop:

1. intensity and speed of turns + slope and features of terrain
2. conditioning both aerobic and anaerobic

my own data points for Colorado runs which is combination of muscle fatigue and aerobic endurance:
a) blue groomers making GS turns high speed - no need to stop
b) blue groomers making constant short slalom turns - maybe every 1000 feet of distance
c) black mogul zipper line full speed - maybe every 25 turns catch breath repeat
d) black groomers GS turns maybe every 700 feet

Even at best shape of my life (after 16 months of continuous rehab and strength training on my ACL replacement + biking), my stregnth was better and my skiing technique better due to improved strength, but shear distance didn't change that much before needing the rest. I do believe that different combinations of exercise could improve both muscle fatigue (more plyometrics and balance motions etc beyond strength training) and aerobic endurance (increased aerobic exercise maybe more like 30 miles jogging/wk instead of 15)

Just my thoughts.
guy
post #49 of 72
I stop when doing drills, and in between them I stop and assess.

Lately I have been stopping to try to figure out what the heck I am doing wrong, and why my da*ned skis dont seem to want to be doing what I want them too. these stops are often accompanied by Loud Expletives, vigorous Head Shaking, angry Pole Jabs, and removing skis and Checking Bases for the Cause of Bad Turns, as it couldn't possibly be my fault.

And here I thought skiing was supposed to be fun.
post #50 of 72
Thread Starter 

technique

I ski real hard. I ski the bumps and do it well although I am not a basher. I finish my turns. When I'm on the flats carving I don't get as tired. I believe that technique does play a role in my fatigue.

The guys I ski with notice the fatigue and winded condition but they also acknowledge that I ski the more challenging, nasty stuff while they ski the groomers. Usually for every turn they make I make 5. They stay away from the bumps, which is where I go.

There is no question, I have a conditioning issue. I go to the gym off season and train as hard as I can. But I still am pathetic on the tread mill and other cardio exercisises. I have worked hard to get to 5.5 mph and I work hard to keep my weight down. There are other conditioning issues as well. I work hard for a little.

And I might be a little lazy on the slopes! I think I just stop too often.
post #51 of 72
If I am on my own I stop for lunch and a bathroom break and thats it. If I am skiing with friends usually 1-2 times a run. The chairlift is for rest unless you are on a seriously long run. I skied in europe the last 3 years and usually had to stop at least once on a run but some of the runs I was skiing were 1500+ vert and 1-2 kilometers long.
post #52 of 72
Like Kevin Sorbo, I ski for the hot chocolate!
When he came out with that one, I knew I loved him for a reason What a man! What a man of a man.
post #53 of 72
I'm afraid I stop quite a lot. Being a control freak I've not yet quite got my head round the idea that you can still be in control even if it will take you a couple of turns or so to stop. Therefore I tend to do a lot of shorter, completed turns which means, good technique or no, I'm doing a lot more work when I'm skiing. Trouble is, I've had so many close calls with people who weren't in control where the only way a nasty crash was avoided was by me putting in a lot of evasive action, that I want to make sure I'm always in a position to do that. (However good a skier you are, if you're going so fast that you can't turn in time to avoid me, the downhill skier, and I have to turn to avoid you, the uphill skier, (especially if you've charged over a ridge without looking) then you're not sufficiently in control). All this control/speed control tends to take its toll and uses up my energy quite fast.

The other thing that uses up my energy actually is lift/gondola queues. Mr Eng is 6'4" and crowds open up in front of him like the Red Sea. They also close behind him (in front of me) like the Red Sea so I end up walking 3 times as far (anyone see the Brainiac experiment on Oxford Street?). And then he wonders why I'm so far behind and knackered to boot.

Either that, or I have a sign on my back saying "ski/walk into me!" :
post #54 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
Like Kevin Sorbo, I ski for the hot chocolate!
When he came out with that one, I knew I loved him for a reason What a man! What a man of a man.
Oh I like that! "Have you seen my force lance??"
post #55 of 72

Conditioning

I consider my conditioning to be poor this year. I really must say that I agree that it is easier and smarter to get in shape to ski. I rollerblade and cycle. Early spring I will cycle around 60 miles a week and increase that to around 120 miles a week by mid summer. I have no problem with the kind of leg burn I get skiing when I cycle because I am spinning to recover. The major advantage I get from cycling is cardio-vascular. I will also rollerblade when I am living in Co. because they have all those miles of bike paths. Rollerblading increases my leg endurance and strength. I really don't know how far I go rollerblading, probably around 5-20 miles.

I am going to get a GPS unit this year so I will have data to help me evaluate my skiing. I just skied the same bump run today and I stopped twice . The bumps were harder, at least I think they were. I also noticed through the trees there was a couple inches of powder on top of an icy crust, difficult conditions. I think Keystone glazed up, which it has a tendency to do. It might have got real warm there in the last week. I think engaging my tips early in the bumps makes a huge difference for me, also softer bumps let me have more control over my speed. It may be that the glaze made me hesitate in engaging my tips and caused me to be more on my heels.

Freeski, to be honest it sounds like you are in horrible shape. I mean horrible sea level shape. People out here say they are not in shape and its a whole different "not in shape" at a few thousand feet than it is at sea level. If you have kids I could understand, plenty of people with kids make the decision to put the time into their children instead of working out, and I say GOD Bless them for it. However, realize that time is the stuff that life is made of, and how you spend your time and on what you spend your time, thats your life.
post #56 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskinow
Just wondering how often people stop to take a short break while on the trail they are skiing. I met some nice guys today and we skied hard, but they did not stop! Now I can hardly walk.

Do you stop and how often.
As an IT worker, I spend a lot of time on my a$$. Being the opposite of many people, I tend to lose weight in the winter skiing. When I first start skiing my legs burn and I have to suck wind down those long trails. But that's why I bring my camera with me whereever I go. So I can gape and take pictures. I'm a passholder so I go often. By the end of the season I can go top to bottom without sucking wind. But for now, a little rest is in order.
post #57 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
Sorry, but I find this thread rather ridiculous. Why do you want to know what others state they are doing on the mountain? When you ski you can see them. Second, taking breaks depends on so many factors that it would be stupid to use the answers here to determine what you are going to do. I break when I feel the need to break. I do hope others do the same.
Hey BESWIFT, aka, Major Winchester! Didn't realize that was you until somebody else pointed that out. Too bad you were banned at the AZ last February. I enjoyed your rants, much like the above example. Here are some of my favorite of your rants:

*If you hit me, bozo, I would have turned around and put your lights out without giving you the benefit of a quote of the law at all.

*I wish Greg would get rid of that Astronaut picture and try something that makes him look like a skier.

*Do you expect me to read a post which starts with a mis-spelled insult? You remind me of a guy I took camping in Wisconsin once.

*By the way, if you haven't discovered it in that little lonely cyber-linked cubicle of yours yet, women are different than men.

*Only an Eskimo could be better qualified than I am to deal with the cold.

*Do you always compose your posts after drinking?

*The Austrian's teaching methods are more plentiful than frogs in a marshy pond.

*Firemen, Policemen, Soldiers, Ski Patrollers, Homeland Defenders, etc. with Hero or Napoleonic complexes would be best put at a distance.

*Please try attacking ideas instead of personalities, it only reflects your home life.

*The U.S. wouldn't allow such a brand to sell commercially. I've skied with the 10th. Their skiis have a white topskin, quite generic.

*I make eratic, ratical turns in front of snowboarders, and I carry a knife.

*Sitting by the fire on my hearth, sipping Italian wine, eating Vermont cheese and munching Canadian crackers, please allow me the liberty of adding a little anecdotal wisdom to this thread

*Skinny dipping requires a reserve of clothing in case the fascists may stumble upon the scene.
post #58 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by james
Freeski, to be honest it sounds like you are in horrible shape. I mean horrible sea level shape. People out here say they are not in shape and its a whole different "not in shape" at a few thousand feet than it is at sea level. If you have kids I could understand, plenty of people with kids make the decision to put the time into their children instead of working out, and I say GOD Bless them for it. However, realize that time is the stuff that life is made of, and how you spend your time and on what you spend your time, thats your life.
James, I think you have a keen sense of the obvious. My background is coaching, I was a championship swimmer and I know plenty about trainning. I go to the gym at least 3 times a week. But, you are right - I am still out of shape. I have problems with fatigue in general, and I have sore muscles even when rested. It is not uncommon to ski a day and not be able to get out of bed the next day. It is always difficult to ski back to back days. If you were to look at me you would not see a person who is out of shape. Laziness or lack of motivation also plays into this, I can't seem to push myself like others.
post #59 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskinow
I go to the gym at least 3 times a week. But, you are right - I am still out of shape. I have problems with fatigue in general, and I have sore muscles even when rested.
Have you ever wondered whether you have a medical condition that makes you fatigued and gives you sore muscles? I'm not a doctor, and I'm not going to suggest possible medical causes because there are so many, some obvious and some not so obvious. It just seems like someone who does some training (3x a week is nothing to sneeze at) and has a history of being a championship athlete shouldn't have these symptoms. And you say it's something that you've been living with for some time.

Just a thought...

Thatsagirl
post #60 of 72

See a Dr!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskinow
James, I think you have a keen sense of the obvious. My background is coaching, I was a championship swimmer and I know plenty about trainning. I go to the gym at least 3 times a week. But, you are right - I am still out of shape. I have problems with fatigue in general, and I have sore muscles even when rested. It is not uncommon to ski a day and not be able to get out of bed the next day. It is always difficult to ski back to back days. If you were to look at me you would not see a person who is out of shape. Laziness or lack of motivation also plays into this, I can't seem to push myself like others.
Honestly, I was so direct with my last response because I thought it might push you to admit you really don't go to the gym, which is what I figured the case to be, given your fatigue. You have a medical condition. What medical condition you have is the only question. It may be as simple as depression, or it may be related to diet or over training, it may be more serious. Please, see a Dr. and be gut level honest with the Dr. about what you are experiencing. Make an appointment, your worth it.
I use workouts like meditiation. When I am spinning on my bike I think about one topic. I just let my thoughts flow on that topic. I have thought about what love is, what anger is about, my work, relationships, anything. The miles become secondary, it helps me with getting the bike out.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How often do you break while on the trail