EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Food & Drink › Your fav. home made food for skiing?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Your fav. home made food for skiing?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
After reading (with envy) the post about the massive grilled steaks, I got to thinking about what I like to eat while I ski. When I am rushing out the door and busy the night before, I end up buying my lunch or eating cold cheese sandwiches. When I have the time, and will be skiing somewhere I can have food heated, I always cook these chicken pockets. I've wrapped them in foil and heated them on woodstoves, asked staff at Breck to heat them for me, poked a stick into them (wrapped in foil) and heated them over a fire, they are my favorite food to bring skiing. Heres the deal though, you post your favorite food you gotta give the recipe.

Chicken pockets (if you ski vail you can substitute crab or lobster )

3 oz. cream cheese (to make the filling thicker use more cream cheese)
3/4 cup milk or half n half
1 tbsp. marjoram
2 tbsp. diced pimento (you can increase to 3 per taste)
2 chicken breasts cooked & diced
2 packs (tubes) of Pillsbury Crescents
2 tbsp. butter
Blend cream cheese, milk, pimentos and marjoram in a mixing bowl until consistant viscosity is reached. Toss diced chicken into mixture.
Preheat oven to 350.
Open one tube of Pillsbury Crescents at a time and carefully place the entire tube of dough on a (teflon of lightly greased) baking sheet. Look for the lead edge of the dough and unwrap carefully and sepperate into four rectangular pieces of dough which will each be intersected diagonally by perforations. Gently press your finger down on these perforations to seal them up.
Melt butter in a saucepan.
Scoop one heaping tbsp. of mix into the center of dough and fold the corners up pinching them to seal the dough. Brush melted butter over tops and place in oven. Cook for around twenty minutes on the middle rack or until tops are golden brown.

I usually let them cool and them wrap them in foil and throw them in the fridge. This recipe makes 8 pockets. The Pillsbury Crescents are each 8 crescent tubes, but since it takes two crescents (triangles) to make one rectangle you end up with half the number.
post #2 of 24
Sounds very tasty.

At the top of my list would be a dozen or so raw oysters, followed by a bowl of hot Gumbo.
Seafood or chicken, it really doesn't matter.

I'd love to post the recipe, but every time I do, someone has trouble with the roux. It's not that hard.
post #3 of 24
We have a dehydrater and my wife makes the best teriyaki beef jerky out of lean London Broil It's perfect for the long drive to Mammoth, 6 hours. It's also perfect to stick in your jacket and have munchies while skiing. :
post #4 of 24
I'm assuming you mean for after skiing??

The people in my ski house are BIG on salad - got to have a salad with dinner....But I recently made a pulled crockpot beef that we had for dinner on rolls - can post the recipe if interested....

Otherwise, "warm" foods like chili, soup, stews, etc hit the spot after a day on the slopes....
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenscats5
I'm assuming you mean for after skiing??

The people in my ski house are BIG on salad - got to have a salad with dinner....But I recently made a pulled crockpot beef that we had for dinner on rolls - can post the recipe if interested....

Otherwise, "warm" foods like chili, soup, stews, etc hit the spot after a day on the slopes....
I'd like the pulled beef recipe, please. Thanks.
post #6 of 24

Gumbo

Quote:
Originally Posted by rayl1964
Sounds very tasty.

At the top of my list would be a dozen or so raw oysters, followed by a bowl of hot Gumbo.
Seafood or chicken, it really doesn't matter.

I'd love to post the recipe, but every time I do, someone has trouble with the roux. It's not that hard.
Hey RayL,
Go ahead and post it. Love a good gumbo recipe. I can make a roux (any color you want).
post #7 of 24
I like sausage soup. The recipe is basically fried up crumble hot and sweet italian sausage, chicken broth, canned tomotos. You serve with noodles and fresh grated parm.
post #8 of 24
I'm old school and I eat sandwhiches sometimes.
Everything flavor bagel
Deli Turkey
Swiss Cheese
Baron Carribean hot sauce
or,
Sandwhich roll
turkey & ham
Habanero hot sauce
This things beat almost any lodge food 'specially the bagle ones
post #9 of 24
Scotch...I mix it with my own special ice (made with real water).
post #10 of 24
A bag of Cashews mixed with Nestle toll house chocolate drops (the kind they use in cookies), and sometimes add in some dried cherries or dried pineapple. Yum.
post #11 of 24
Tuna sandwiches. Kinda weird, but I have many fond memories of sitting in a lodge at lunchtime eating a delicious (if half-squished) tuna sandwich. My mom always made them for skiing -- put chopped apple and pecans in the tuna, lots of mayo, whole wheat breaad. For some reason, it STILL hits the spot.
post #12 of 24
james, I make 2x those about half that size by folding into a croissant shape.

Try them with lingonberry or quince or apricot preserves for dessert.

The salty ones I do with diced ham, then brush with egg and caraway seed, just to know which are dessert.
post #13 of 24

HHAHAAHAHHAH  THATS THE BEST!!!!   i love it!  made with real water!  

post #14 of 24

 

Quote:
I like sausage soup. The recipe is basically fried up crumble hot and sweet italian sausage, chicken broth, canned tomotos. You serve with noodles and fresh grated parm.

 

Try cutting an eggplant into cubes and throwing them in as well. After 30 or 40 minutes they disintegrate but add texture.

 

For on the hill I like egg salad sandwiches.

post #15 of 24
Pickup phone and call a pizza place. Works for me.
post #16 of 24

Leftover pulled pork, wrapped in a flour tortilla with a little parmesan and salsa verde.  Wrap in foil and pack several  fairly tightly into a thermos bottle, still warm and mighty tasty at 16:00 after being packed at 05:30.

post #17 of 24

Leftover Thanksgiving turkey sandwiches is always my favorite home made brown bag snack, either in the car, in the lodge, or on the deck.  It's extra tasty because Thanksgiving Friday or Saturday is usually my first ski day of the season.

post #18 of 24

I enjoy a good burger while at the ski hill, but pound for pound after a hard day of skiing nothing beats pasta.  Any pasta, but my personal favorite would have to be gnoche with a good meat based sauce. 

 

Hits all the major requirements, lots of carbs after a full day of exercise, protein to help rebuild the muscles you've damaged, and some vegetables to make you feel better about yourself while eating it.  A glass of milk and some garlic cheese bread to go with it and you're pretty close to heaven. 

 

Then you break out the beer and look for a hot tub... or some slap n tickle depending on who you've been skiing with.

post #19 of 24

Ski dinner would have to be the slow cooker pot roast recipe using Lipton Onion Soup Mix.  It's on the mix package.  Unbelievably great.  We try to remember to get chuck roast cuts from Costco, they really are the best.

 

I'm going to make some of that cashew trail mix, that sounds REALLY GOOD.

post #20 of 24
Green chili chicken soup!!!
post #21 of 24

Mac-n-Cheese with bacon.

post #22 of 24

The good ol' PB&J and an apple.  Plus the lunch beer at the car and a flask full of homemade Mexican coffee liquor or peppermint schnapps  to sip on lift rides...

post #23 of 24

Since the cost of on the hill food is getting out hand with a family, I started to bring light snacks & sandwiches in my backpack.  This always includes brownies individually wrapped in foil so the kids can eat them anywhere they want to. I used to make brownies from scratch but now I don't bother because the Ghirardelli mix from COSTCO is very good and inexpensive.  When skiing alone I bring soup in one of those individual serving sized vacuum thermos things, and stick it in the backpack.  I use the microwave to heat it up, pour it into the bottle and it is still piping hot at lunchtime.  Most of my soups have the usual leek and potato base, and then I throw in whatever needs to be used before it spoils in the fridge.  Last week it was squash.  This week I have carrots and turnips to use up, and some celery left over from Friday night's creole sauce.  Soups are nutritious & cheap since they are mostly made with food that would normally go to waste.

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by nhmtns View Post

Mac-n-Cheese with bacon.


 +25

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Drink
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Food & Drink › Your fav. home made food for skiing?