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Why do my skis go faster than me?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I know this is a stupid newbie question

But I occationally during certain time of the day like early in the morning that when I'm going moderate speed or extra steep hill I always have the feeling that my skis are eagerly trying to move forward with out my upper body:. it's like your skis feel faster along than u can go as a whole....the falling backward feeling.

Is it because I don't use poles or is it because my bindings are mounted a little too far back(but boot and ski line align perfectly)

After a run or 2 it dissappears though:
post #2 of 23
Probably because you're letting the skis get out in front of your body/hips.

It takes some skill development to keep your body moving ahead of the skis. I would guess that you're not actually adjusting after a couple of runs, but rather you're getting used to how it feels to have them be in front of you. This is the sensation of the typical skier who tends to ride the skis with the weight on their heels or behind.

One way to consider countering this is to actively project your upper body towards the center of the upcoming turn starting at the end of the previous turn. Move your body downhill (perpendicular to the slope), not up "like the trees grow". Play with that for a run or two. You can even try it on a nice, gentle slope before you take it to the steeper parts of the playground.
post #3 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctown
I know this is a stupid newbie question

But I occationally during certain time of the day like early in the morning that when I'm going moderate speed or extra steep hill I always have the feeling that my skis are eagerly trying to move forward with out my upper body:. it's like your skis feel faster along than u can go as a whole....the falling backward feeling.

Is it because I don't use poles or is it because my bindings are mounted a little too far back(but boot and ski line align perfectly)

After a run or 2 it dissappears though:

Try for the 1st run on a very gentle terrain to skate down the fall line, if skating properly you will be extending your upper body out in front of you down hill i.e. mass of your body ahead of your feet. When you get some speed going try going into some short turns. Stop and try it some more. You sound like you need to get warmed up and get the neurons firing.
post #4 of 23
ctown,

Why? Because PTEX is slippery like a banana peel.

I first noticed this feeling when I got a new pair of skis once. From the belly of a turn, I could feel the skis screaming out ahead of me. It takes a a bit of effort to anticipate this movement and stay on top of the skis. But you can also "fix" this problem by starting your turns in the back seat and pivoting/skidding your skis more. Have someone watch your skiing from the side and see if your feet are ahead of you when you are going straight down the hill in the middle of a turn.
post #5 of 23
More than likely you are in the backseat when you start a new turn, especially if you are just getting into carving turns. For the first few runs of the day you might be a little timid and leaning into the hill until you get comfortable (even if you aren't really doing it on purpose it can still happen)

SSH has good advice to project forward to where your body will be in the new turn when you change edges. I would suggest also making sure to reach down the hill for a pole touch to start the new turn. Reaching will force you away from the slope and towards that perpendicular to the slope position he talks about.
post #6 of 23
I agree with the other posters 100%, but there is one other variable aside from body mechanics and position.

Since you are realtively new to skiing, how are you at reading snow? Eastern icy cord can be pretty darned fast stuff when the hill opens in the morning, especially if it has "set hard" (frozen), after night grooming.

You'll find conditions change (underfoot) all day ....
post #7 of 23
Concentrate on keeping your hands well in front of your body, and establish and maintain pressure on the front of your boot tounges with your shins.
post #8 of 23
The short answer is; inertia and you suck. As to how to fix it, I'm sure many will offer a much longer answer for you.
post #9 of 23
Just about all skiers move into the backseat when they are skiing out of the comfort zone. That is caused (for an adult anyway) by a number of interrelated factors (e.g. speed, terrain, skill, fear, muscle stiffness, etc.). Assuming that you know how to properly position over your skis on gentle terrain (or one that you're comfortable with), probably the best progressive approach to correct the backseat problem is speed control. By slowing down (by either rounding out your turns more or picking a mellower slope), you'll be more likely able to stablize yourself over your skis (or catchup with your skis) before things get out of control. This is best to do when you're practicing alone (or skiing with ppl less skillful than you) so that you don't have to worry about catching up with (and/or impressing) your peer group. Keep practicing until you can pick up the pace to advance to the next level (whatever it may be). Have fun!
post #10 of 23
L7 had a bad night ... Leeroy's trailer fell off the blocks again lass night an kilt one a' his dawgs.
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
L7 had a bad night ... Leeroy's trailer fell off the blocks again lass night an kilt one a' his dawgs.
What are you talking about?! The trailer sits on the ground... can't afford no dang blocks. How'd you know about the dog though?
post #12 of 23
ctown,
Try two simple things...
1) During the turn, pull your inside foot back under your hips. You can't pull it too far back, people don't bend that way. Pull it as far back as it'll comfortably go.

2) Keep both hands in your field of vision. Your arms should be comfortable out to the sides for balance with the hands in front. If you can see both hands, that's pretty good positioning. Having the hands in front helps keep the body's center of mass (CM) over the skis, not behind them.


Ken
post #13 of 23
It's because your feet are not behind you, probably because you are afraid of falling on your face. Trust your skis; move forward.
post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thx guys I'll try all of your advices and let you know what I'm doing wrong. I think I have a bad habit of not using poles and have my arms+hand always behind me when I go into turns
post #15 of 23

Skis running in front of me

I agree 100% with NE1. Unless you are a very accomlished slalom racer on old K2 VO skis and are accelerating off your tails ON PURPOSE then maintain shin pressure on your boot tongues and keep your hands in front. If you aren't doing this - in all probability you are in the back seat.
Also to compliment the hands in front and shin pressure tips. look up and ahead, when you look down this will give you a tendency to stick your butt out/get back/bend at the waist.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctown
Thx guys I'll try all of your advices and let you know what I'm doing wrong. I think I have a bad habit of not using poles and have my arms+hand always behind me when I go into turns
Keep your elbows in front of your backbone and bent comfortably.

Of course, it's possible (perhaps even likely) that your stance on your skis and your balance are limited by the set-up of your boots and bindings. I see many folks who really could use a good alignment session...
post #17 of 23

Nice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler
Try for the 1st run on a very gentle terrain to skate down the fall line, if skating properly you will be extending your upper body out in front of you down hill i.e. mass of your body ahead of your feet. When you get some speed going try going into some short turns. Stop and try it some more. You sound like you need to get warmed up and get the neurons firing.
Great drill for what he needs! In fact, I think I'm going to try this, too!
post #18 of 23
Folks, If Ctowns issue/feeling goes away because he gets used it then you are offering great advice, however if as he says after a run or two he is able to keep up then w/o seeing whats really going on, I may just as easily chalk it up to a warm-up run.

CTown, Some people just take longer to warm up, my entire first day of each season I find myself constantly everywhere BUT "In-balance" But the second day I'm fine. Good Luck and Merry Christmas!
post #19 of 23
Noone's mentioned this, and it instantly made me a better skier.

Pull your feet back. This involves flexing your ankles, and gets your center of mass forward. Simple move, easy to feel and it works wonders!

Pull both your feet back under you, keep that shin to tongue pressure throughout the turn. Don't let your feet get ahead of you so you have to bend over forward to catch up with them, pull them back.
post #20 of 23
I took a skiing dev PSIA clinic a few years ago. The entire topic of two days was "keeping up with your skis". I have about four pages of type-written notes from it. More than I care to relate here.

Here's a couple things to play with--

Find gentle terrain with some rolls. Practice skiing straight down it, as you move over to the down side of each rolls, focus on moving your hips forward so you stay at the same fore/aft angle with relationship to your skis.

Practice some up-hill christie. Start with skis angled about 45* down the falline in an open parallel position, ski and arc with the uphill edges set, you should move across the hill until you are eventually pointing up the hill. While you do this exercise your main focus keeping is keeping you inside hip moving ahead of your skis all the way up until you stop ... one more time ... "all the way up until you stop". A secondary focus can be maintaining shin contact (contact, not necessarily pressure) thru the entire arc.

An analogy to think when you are entering a turn-- going into a ski turn is like diving off a diving board, your body goes first, your feet goes last.

Ken K from Wa.
post #21 of 23
Nice post Ken,
You must move with your equipment (easier said than done).

Quote:
Probably because you're letting the skis get out in front of your body/hips.
ssh is so right!

RW
post #22 of 23
It's because of this same feeling that I always have a problem on my first one or two runs down a certain, steep and icy run at my local hill. There's always that scary feeling when you look down that slope that always seems to take away my control over my body's natural instincts, which are telling me to lean into the hill. This prevents me from putting my upper body in front of the skis like I should. Course, after those initial tomohawks, I get used to the feeling and I'm doing fine for the rest of the day.
post #23 of 23

........

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
It's because your feet are not behind you, probably because you are afraid of falling on your face. Trust your skis; move forward.
Remembering ssh's phrasing of Projecting your upper body ahead, Ghost's Trust your skis..., and just thinking about the 1000_Steps drill helps a lot...to keep that old stance foot from hanging on too long and putting your COM in the backseat...
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