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Bring Back Straight Skis - Page 6

post #151 of 360
The Hart Javelin is still available.
post #152 of 360
Is that a ski available in the States?
post #153 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkarlberg View Post
Is that a ski available in the States?
Check your PM's
post #154 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Okay, Elan (for all practical purposes) actually did make parabolic skis. Some of their very late straight skis even had a very minimal parabolic sidecut to them. The SCX did in fact have a parabolic sidecut to it... 110-62-110...
Actually dimensions are 110/60/100. The midpoint of the curve being closer to the tail, hence the shovel is wider.
post #155 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkarlberg View Post
I dont understand why companies don't make a pair of straight skis. I know of about 20 people who would buy them the second they came out.

You are in luck! Second hand stores and consignment shops across the country have straight skis that they cannot get rid of (except to people who want to make furniture out of them) and they would probably sell them for $.50 each.

Buy them. You will make the charities happy, you will be happy, and we will no longer have to listen to this silliness.

Personally, I just don't know why they won't make mountain bikes with square wheels. Enough of this easy pedaling silliness. After all, anyone can pedal a mountain bike with round wheels.
post #156 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills View Post

Personally, I just don't know why they won't make mountain bikes with square wheels. Enough of this easy pedaling silliness. After all, anyone can pedal a mountain bike with round wheels.

I sense some sarcasm... I might be young but I am and old-fashioned person. I live in a small town, I hate rap music, and want to kill the people building the huge chain stores in the town center.

I dont like change, I never have and I never will. I like my straight skis and thats what i want.
post #157 of 360
Turn down the intensity a notch, champ. Otherwise you'll never be able to handle it when you turn into the butt of every straight ski joke in the local shop.
post #158 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Actually dimensions are 110/60/100. The midpoint of the curve being closer to the tail, hence the shovel is wider.
Not on all of them. The later models had a narrower tail (after the PSX was released), but the inital ones were semetrical. The skis existed for several years and went through a few changes over the years after other companies developed competing products.

Later

GREG
post #159 of 360
Ding-ding-ding

Round #2 begins. This should be exciting...
post #160 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Not on all of them. The later models had a narrower tail (after the PSX was released), but the inital ones were semetrical. The skis existed for several years and went through a few changes over the years after other companies developed competing products.

Later

GREG
No, I have them from the first year. They measure 112/60/100. The sidecut is symmetrical (as a parabola). The waist of the ski is not in the middle of the ski (probably true of all skis). Elan never made a ski as wide in the tail as the shovel.
post #161 of 360
I know for a fact that the Stealth was 87-45-87... As soon as I find the dimensions of the others I will post them for you. BTW, you have a 1996 SCX?
post #162 of 360
Terminator/Styletto were 108-65-108 I think.
post #163 of 360
Are they only ten years old? I just remember I got them towards the end of the first season they were sold in US. I measured the tails before my first post, and all three sections before my follow up. I'll measure the stealth now. You might be right on that.
post #164 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Terminator/Styletto were 108-65-108 I think.
I stand corrected. The Stealths look like 86/46/86 actual measure (close enough to 87/45/87 spec) and the mid point is equal distance from the widest points. Interesting. The curve on the original SCX is centered a little towards the rear of the ski.
post #165 of 360
It makes one wonder if some of them were truly parabolic... Supposedly PSX's were as well... but if the mounting point was not dead center (with equal tip and tail widths)... you know what that means .
post #166 of 360
Most major ski manufacturers make a mogul model with dimensions very similar to a "straight ski" but in somewhat shorter lengths around 170-180 cm's as opposed to 205-210 cm's or so of yesteryear. Fischer, for example, makes a mogul ski called the Lunar with a sidecut of 90-62-78 mm. Fischer's last true straight SL racing ski was 89-63-76 mm, very similar in dimensions though different in flex pattern.

Glen Plake still skis on "straight skis", I believe.

A great majority of those who ski on modern "shaped" skis still skid their turns down groomers. They've spent all that money to upgrade their equipment but effectively realize no performance enhancement and in some situations less. Look around you next time you ride a lift up the hill and I think you will agree.

In the PNW, you can see some very good skiers still on old "straight" boards. They use the technique associated with straight skis and have to work harder, but most would say that they still ski well.

Mark Elling author of the "All Mountain Skier," wrote in the first edition of his book that there was something more sublime about carving a "straight ski" that makes the greater effort worth it. It should be noted that that verbiage was dropped in the Revised Edition of his book after the "shaped" ski revolution had firmly taken hold.

That having been said, most here who can carve turns on straight skis and have written about taking an old pair of skis out for a spin, have said they would not go back to the "straight" ski days because modern skis perform so much better. If someone wants to learn to carve, the increased shapliness of modern skis makes it much easier. It is also possible to carve much tighter arcs on a shaped ski than is possible on a "straight" ski.

It seems the most recent trend is toward straightening out somewhat the sidecut of modern skis. The hyper-carvers of a few seasons ago have fallen by the wayside recently.

When the new FIS racing rules take effect requiring a larger minimum GS turn radius next year there may be a further filter down sidecut effect. However, other than specialty mogul skis, I don't think we will see a return to the classic "straight" ski anytime soon.

Bottom line if you are having fun what does it matter whether you ski on "straight" or "shaped" skis. Beyond encouraging someone to try the latest and greatest skis along with a lesson or two on modern technique, if having done so, they prefer the traditional style gear, that's fine with me.
post #167 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
It makes one wonder if some of them were truly parabolic... Supposedly PSX's were as well... but if the mounting point was not dead center (with equal tip and tail widths)... you know what that means .
I don't know if they are parabolic but the sidecut is symmetrical. The SCX and presumedly the PSX have more ski in front of the narrowest point, so the curve continues farther away from the axis. The Stealth and Terminator/Stiletto narrowest point is centered midpoint on the ski (effective edge). I've had many opportunities to refute claims that the tails and shovels are equal on my SCXs. I didn't know (remember?) it is true for the more exotic Elans of that era.
post #168 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy View Post
When the new FIS racing rules take effect requiring a larger minimum GS turn radius next year there may be a further filter down sidecut effect. However, other than specialty mogul skis, I don't think we will see a return to the classic "straight" ski anytime soon.
All but the shortest lengths of GS skis already comply with the new regulations. For example, the only ski Fischer needs to change is the WC GS 173.
post #169 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkarlberg View Post
I sense some sarcasm... I might be young but I am and old-fashioned person. I live in a small town, I hate rap music, and want to kill the people building the huge chain stores in the town center.

I dont like change, I never have and I never will. I like my straight skis and thats what i want.
You probably shouldn't kill people just for building chain stores. Rap music was "new" in the mid to late 80s when Run DMC, Salt-N-Pepa, The Fresh Prince and DJ Jazzy Jeff, and Public Enemy were around. Hating it doesn't make you old-fashioned, it just makes you a white kid from a small town in New Hampshire.

Being "anti-change" is completely absurd. Come back when your hormones have subsided a bit.
post #170 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy View Post
Most major ski manufacturers make a mogul model with dimensions very similar to a "straight ski" but in somewhat shorter lengths around 170-180 cm's as opposed to 205-210 cm's or so of yesteryear. Fischer, for example, makes a mogul ski called the Lunar with a sidecut of 90-62-78 mm. Fischer's last true straight SL racing ski was 89-63-76 mm, very similar in dimensions though different in flex pattern.

Glen Plake still skis on "straight skis", I believe.

A great majority of those who ski on modern "shaped" skis still skid their turns down groomers. They've spent all that money to upgrade their equipment but effectively realize no performance enhancement and in some situations less. Look around you next time you ride a lift up the hill and I think you will agree.

In the PNW, you can see some very good skiers still on old "straight" boards. They use the technique associated with straight skis and have to work harder, but most would say that they still ski well.

Mark Elling author of the "All Mountain Skier," wrote in the first edition of his book that there was something more sublime about carving a "straight ski" that makes the greater effort worth it. It should be noted that that verbiage was dropped in the Revised Edition of his book after the "shaped" ski revolution had firmly taken hold.

That having been said, most here who can carve turns on straight skis and have written about taking an old pair of skis out for a spin, have said they would not go back to the "straight" ski days because modern skis perform so much better. If someone wants to learn to carve, the increased shapliness of modern skis makes it much easier. It is also possible to carve much tighter arcs on a shaped ski than is possible on a "straight" ski.

It seems the most recent trend is toward straightening out somewhat the sidecut of modern skis. The hyper-carvers of a few seasons ago have fallen by the wayside recently.

When the new FIS racing rules take effect requiring a larger minimum GS turn radius next year there may be a further filter down sidecut effect. However, other than specialty mogul skis, I don't think we will see a return to the classic "straight" ski anytime soon.

Bottom line if you are having fun what does it matter whether you ski on "straight" or "shaped" skis. Beyond encouraging someone to try the latest and greatest skis along with a lesson or two on modern technique, if having done so, they prefer the traditional style gear, that's fine with me.
Holy bumperoo batman....let's bump this puppy up to 900 posts....whee!!!!!!!!

Seriously tho, this could be the best post I have ever read on epicski. Has the technology in my new supershape skis blown away the old school stuff I used to love?

Of course it has.

Did I have just as much fun(not knowing any better) on those 1989 Olin RTS 205's with the Look z turntables powered by the TNT's with the lime green buckles and my old school technique...

You betcha I did.

Great post lostboy, and goes nicely with my signature below.


which makes it...

word
post #171 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Birdman829 View Post
You probably shouldn't kill people just for building chain stores. Rap music was "new" in the mid to late 80s when Run DMC, Salt-N-Pepa, The Fresh Prince and DJ Jazzy Jeff, and Public Enemy were around. Hating it doesn't make you old-fashioned, it just makes you a white kid from a small town in New Hampshire.

Being "anti-change" is completely absurd. Come back when your hormones have subsided a bit.

I dont live in Nh I live in MA.
post #172 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkarlberg View Post
I dont understand why companies don't make a pair of straight skis. I know of about 20 people who would buy them the second they came out.
Same here.
post #173 of 360
This thread will never die!
post #174 of 360
has anybody skied those Hart skis?
http://www.hartskis.com/us/ski/6/

also, you can get old school straight skis from Norway!
http://www.treski.no/

I have a pair of 198 Rossi 7S's that I will be re-mounting this season.

And sadly, I believe I'm one of those individuals who skids/slides his turns with shaped skis.

As for the thrift store route, totally! Also the dump. The local dump in Napa/Solano County has an area where you leave off stuff like wardrobes, bed posts, bikes, and yes, skis. I think you pay a nominal fee to rummage through the area (like $5 or something) and take what you want.

post #175 of 360

straight skis

as I stood in line last year watching skis getting fatter and fatter( the kids were using stuff up to 120 waist) I thought about fashion and neckties........and I knew that somehow , when everyone had a fat ski, the manufacturers would bring back skinny skis and the fat ones would look stupid........................
post #176 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by duke walker View Post
as I stood in line last year watching skis getting fatter and fatter( the kids were using stuff up to 120 waist) I thought about fashion and neckties........and I knew that somehow , when everyone had a fat ski, the manufacturers would bring back skinny skis and the fat ones would look stupid........................
This isn't about fashon..it is about function. Straight skis are limited to die hard bumpers.
post #177 of 360
Dookey, I have not tried any hart skis yet, but check them out. They make a pair of almost-straight 201s ($100-ya they're cheap), im very close to ordering a pair of F-17 Team 177s ($300-not bad atall). I'v read numerous reviews that say they are great skis, the only drawback is that they're rumored to be not so durable.

P.S. If you cant find the F-17s on the website go back to the homepage and enter the UK side of it.
post #178 of 360
^you might want to call Hart before buying those "$100.00" Javelins.

I guarantee you that's a type-o since all of the other Javelin skis on their site are $999.00!!!
post #179 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
^you might want to call Hart before buying those "$100.00" Javelins.

I guarantee you that's a type-o since all of the other Javelin skis on their site are $999.00!!!

Actually You will notice that they are A vintage ski unlike the other ones displayed there, and they are marked down from $300.
post #180 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
^you might want to call Hart before buying those "$100.00" Javelins.

I guarantee you that's a type-o since all of the other Javelin skis on their site are $999.00!!!
Those old straight Javelins ARE $100.00
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