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Bring Back Straight Skis - Page 5

post #121 of 360
Quote:
He does this because that is what he likes to ski on.
That was my only point. The question was "does anyone miss the days of 204cm skis?" My answer was yes, Glen Plake does. Too bad about you not being at Holiday Valley. Some other time I guess. And I wasn't putting down your skiing ability or underestimating your skillz. Note the smiley face after what I said. I just like to see people ski so I know where the opinions are coming from.
post #122 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattchuck2
That was my only point. The question was "does anyone miss the days of 204cm skis?" My answer was yes, Glen Plake does.
I still disagree with this. I don't think that's why he skis them, and I don't think that he thinks we should bring back those days. I think that he skis them because he find them a challenge and recognizes very clearly that they are far more difficult to ski than are modern skis.

The original question was:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski2die
Does anyone out there long for the days of 204 slalom's and no groomers? Long rithmic moguls and back country with verticle lines with no side slips?
...and I, for one, don't miss those days for a moment. And I don't think Plake does, either.
post #123 of 360
Well, I don't miss them. As proof, I turned my old straight skis into Christmas decorations this year. I sanded them down, painted them red with white snow flakes, screwed the two together in a slight "x" shape, put a bow on them and set them outside. Everybody loves them and, most importantly, my wife loves them...which always yields certain benefits for me!
post #124 of 360
Every ski I ever owned has had sidecut, just a question of how much. Every ski I ever owned has not had metal edges. So my vote for creative anachronism is for the ski without any edges or bottom treatment at all. Pure wood unlaminated. Oh and Long Thongs as well.

I have been skiing for over 53 years. I buy ski equipment every so often. I now have three pair of modern "shaped" skis and love them all. I gave my fine pair of 205 cm Blizzard Slaloms to my son who seldom skis now that he has the little ones. He didn't have the skills to ski the older Dynastar Omega Giant Slaloms which would put you into the trees if you even had a wrong technique thought.

There are a whole range of "shaped" skis which is why I have three pair. Skis are becoming more specialized and Bravo for that.
post #125 of 360
Bring back straight skis? Time to step into the new century. Don't tell me you are still wearing 1980's Vaurnet sunglasses too. Embrace the future, open up those turns and your stance too, it is 2006!
post #126 of 360

My final answer

I've thought about it, because I had so much fun skiing back when I was on straight skis. But then.....I've had even more fun on shaped skis. Now I have the ULTIMATE in shape skis.....huh SSH?

So my answer to Bring back the straight skis is .....
No!

Let me rephrase that

H#LL NO!
post #127 of 360
I like the new slalom skis in the course, but if next year, I had to ski the old pencils of old, I wouldn't quit skiing, just change my technique and still have fun (provided the course had the horizontal offset prevalent in 1996).
post #128 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulskier
Don't tell me you are still wearing 1980's Vaurnet sunglasses too.
Hey, what do you mean by that!? I still wear my Vuarnet Mountaneering glasses. You know, the ones with the super dark lenses and the leather side shields. I also have the same version made by RayBan but these ones have the mirror lenses.

Also, I just retired my Oakley Pilots (?). These are the glasses that Greg Lemond made famous in the mid to late 80's. The lenses could be switched (grey, yellow or clear) and they were really practical and well designed.

I guess that I have become officially and 'old foggie'.

The English Beat rules... ! (an english band from the 80's who still do the Geritol tour every now and then). On the same note, add The Clash, Ramones... etc

Ok, enough rambling and back to my rocking chair :
post #129 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick
Now I have the ULTIMATE in shape skis.....huh SSH?
I didn't steer you wrong, did I? :
post #130 of 360
save it for later is an english beat song, not a command to keep the straight skis and vaurnets. i confess i like them too but i have tears of a clown right now thinking about what you look like when you look into the mirror in the bathroom with your sunglasses on.
post #131 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulskier
save it for later is an english beat song, not a command to keep the straight skis and vaurnets. i confess i like them too but i have tears of a clown right now thinking about what you look like when you look into the mirror in the bathroom with your sunglasses on.
Good one!

Soulskier, a message to you. I fought the shaped skis and the shaped skis won... (Specials, The Clash)

Happy New Year everybody!
post #132 of 360
hey ski2die, are you still catching the tails with the new wondersticks?!
post #133 of 360
Not sure if this is the best place for this question, but has anybody here tried out a modern SG or DH back to back with something like my old Kästle SGs?

I really love the old SGs for going fast, but I can't help but wonder if the SG skis have come as far as the slalom skis have. I am really blown away with how much better the Fischer WC SL is than the SLs that were available in the early to mid 80s when I got my Kästles. Can you imagine making a 60 mph turn with say a dyanastar coursa Comp (chicken hart) ski? Not much better than plastic bags over your ski boots. Yet it wasn't a problem for the 165-cm Fischer WC SCs.

Do they even make SG skis anymore or do people just use their GS boards for that or are the DH skis more "turnable"?
post #134 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
Not sure if this is the best place for this question, but have anybody here tried out a modern SG or DH back to back with something like my old Kästle SGs?

I really love the old SGs for going fast, but I can't help but wonder if the SG skis have come as far as the slalom skis have. I am really blown away with how much better the Fischer WC SL is than the SLs that were available in the early to mid 80s when I got my Kästles. Can you imagine making a 60 mph turn with say a dyanastar coursa Comp (chicken hart) ski? Not much better than plastic bags over your ski boots. Yet it wasn't a problem for the 165-cm Fischer WC SCs.

Do they even make SG skis anymore or do people just use their GS boards for that or are the DH skis more "turnable"?
I have skied a pair of modern 205 CM Blizzard SG skis. Absolutely the ride of my life- these things pull some crazy Gs while holding on to ice that's pretty much what you'd find on the surface of a lake. Compared to my limited experience with straight skis (I'm only 18- I don't think I missed much, though), these things felt like 205 cm ice skates, whereas the straight skis would never make some of the turns set in a modern SG course without sending you into the fences.

Straight skis are for fighters; for the rest of us who like to work with our equipment instead of against it, we have shaped skis.
post #135 of 360

Bring Back Straight Skis

Don't know about that.
Length is a crap shoot. I can use anything from 150cm
to 210cm.

My 188cm parabolics work better on eastern hard packed
and packed powder (Fischer RCR - similar to RC4 but stiff
and more sidecut)

These Fischers stink bigtime in crud and deep powder -
totally unpredictable. They are so bad I won't even take
them on western trips. I've dug out a old pair of Volkl
Snowrangers which are great for that.

The Parabolice are downright dangerous for tree skiing-
they want to hook and pitch and dive unperdictably.

Best skiing is often in the woods.
John in Md
post #136 of 360
They aren't parabolics... that proves you can't ski them.
post #137 of 360
[quote=HeluvaSkier]They aren't parabolics... [quote]

what are they?
post #138 of 360
Read the whole thread, I think it is in there somewhere. Do you know what a parabola is?
post #139 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
Read the whole thread, I think it is in there somewhere. Do you know what a parabola is?
as a matter of fact I do. why do you ask?
post #140 of 360
I loved staright skis so much I have two pair Salomon Power 8 skis , 1S and 2S in mint condition in the garage rafters that were never skied again after skiing my first shaped ski, the Volkl Carver Plus , which I thought were short at 198 cm.

I'd be willing to send the Salomons to a good home if anybody would want them. They were great skis in their day, but IMHO the change in ski design with the "shaped" skis and their continued refinement with construction etc, aniquated everything previous to this.
post #141 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12CSki
as a matter of fact I do. why do you ask?
Because it's impossible to make a parabolic ski.
post #142 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Because it's impossible to make a parabolic ski.
Yeah? Great. However my original question goes unanswered.
post #143 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12CSki
Yeah? Great. However my original question goes unanswered.
They are shaped skis. They don't follow the formula for a parabola, so aren't parabolic. However, they are shaped, and perhaps even extremely so. If you are looking for a formula to describe all shaped skis, I think you'll be disappointed (although I haven't tried to find the commonality, myself).
post #144 of 360
Okay, Elan (for all practical purposes) actually did make parabolic skis. Some of their very late straight skis even had a very minimal parabolic sidecut to them. The SCX did in fact have a parabolic sidecut to it... 110-62-110. Because Elan invented the shaped ski, the name stuck (kind of like calling all SUV's trucks). However, skis from any other company at the time and now all companies are SHAPED skis. The sidecuts are equations based on continually changing second order polynomials... which, news flash, is not a parabola... therefore they are not "parabolic." Some have probably also been bits of hyperbolas put together as well (note: you need several to make a sidecut on a ski). Determining the sidecut equation would have to be done on one of two highly complex computer programs (both names escape me right now). You would also have to apply a changing rate of change to your entire parabolic equation to come up with modern cuts. Many I am certain are completely different from the mid-sole mark forward when compared to the mid-sole mark backwards.

Later

GREG
post #145 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
Okay, Elan (for all practical purposes) actually did make parabolic skis. Some of their very late straight skis even had a very minimal parabolic sidecut to them. The SCX did in fact have a parabolic sidecut to it... 110-62-110. Because Elan invented the shaped ski, the name stuck (kind of like calling all SUV's trucks).
I stand corrected! You know, I wondered if those were true parabolics, but didn't check. They didn't ski nearly as well, though, hence the move away from this.
post #146 of 360
Thread Starter 
hey ski2die, are you still catching the tails with the new wondersticks.

OK I have been doing a little testing the last couple of weekends. Skied one day on my Volkl 203 slalom p40's. Great ski! I worked on making linked radius turns without bringing the tail off the snow. Very difficult and inefficient. In order to do an arching radius turn on these I had to be doing 40+ MPH. With public on the hill, one is not able to maintain that speed safetly for an extended distance.

I then put on my Volkl 183 P40 F1, moderate shaped, high performance slalom ski (about 3 years old). These allowed me to link radius turns while not uplifting the tails. I also did some backcountry steeps which required short quick turns, up unwieghting with hard edging on the landing do to ice. The held supurbly! My tails were a little slower to excape the snow than the older straights, but not a big deal. On the groomers there is no comparison, the shapes are much more fun.

I also would like to add that I am somewhat anal regarding ski tuning, these skis are self tuned every day out, both in like new shape.

I have been fighting the acceptance of the shaped ski for about five years but it looks like I must admit the newer boards have advantages!
post #147 of 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski2die
hey ski2die, are you still catching the tails with the new wondersticks.

OK I have been doing a little testing the last couple of weekends. Skied one day on my Volkl 203 slalom p40's. Great ski! I worked on making linked radius turns without bringing the tail off the snow. Very difficult and inefficient. In order to do an arching radius turn on these I had to be doing 40+ MPH. With public on the hill, one is not able to maintain that speed safetly for an extended distance.
I had a very similar experience last year on old RC4 Vacuum technique SLS slalom skis. They could carve ultra-long radius turns (which tend to get me going 50 mph on a blue. However, I found that they could carve really tight slalom turns if I really laid into them. At my weight the slalom turn required about a 35 mph speed and a tip jam to decamber them. Anything in between had to be scarved.
post #148 of 360
ski2die, first off, with shaped skis it is a whole different type of turn then the old "traditional" style turn. There are no more jump turns. The only time that turn is needed with the new boards is when you are in tight, steep chutes. The turn that is more advantageous for the "shape" ski is a slight tilt of the inner foot inward to create a smooth turn. A bit like when you when you were a kid and stuck your hand out the window and flew the imaginary plane. Most shape skis though are funner with GS turns, that is the beauty of them. However, there are some fat skis that have mastered the ability to do all types of radius and are great on ice, too.
post #149 of 360
I might not want to bring back stright skis for the same reasons as you all do, but i definitly want to.

Im only 16 but i was raised skiing New Hampshire on straight skis.

Right now I ski A pair of 168 Rossi Scratch Moguls, One of the slimmist, straitest skis that that were sold last season. A few years back my Friend got a pair of Volkl Dragonslayers, the last straight ski made, that i know of.

I never skied a pair of a 190+ but i would definitly like to, but i really just want a pair of 175s, I'm more of a side of the trail powder-vadler/mogul fanatic.

I dont understand why companies don't make a pair of straight skis. I know of about 20 people who would buy them the second they came out.

And yes, i do have a pair of parabolic Racing skis that i use for my race team, but i do not enjoy carving atall, its too easy and no fun, no challenge to it, anyone can do it.
post #150 of 360
Stop it. This thread was rightfully dead.
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