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New AC4s arrived. I have some Marker ??

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I have the AC4s with Marker Motion AT bindings. The method for attaching the binding to the ski is pretty straight forward and now I've got a couple adjustment questions.

- The length hash marks correspond to boot shell size correct? Is it measured by the piece of plastic hovering over the hash marks (dots versus dashes?) or by the piece of plastic with the center channel which is about 3mm behind the piece over the hash? Hope that makes sense.
- Leaving the binding in its "out of the box setting" it seems that there's about 1/2" of space behind the heel portion of the binding. Is the extra room back there for adjusting the whole binding backwards a bit on the ski? Any reason I'd want to do this? More float in powder?
- What DIN settings does Marker recommend for an expert* skier who's 160lbs nekkid?
- There's a bit of play in the toe piece because of how it attaches to the rails. You'd think there shouldn't be any movement there, but it's probably normal. Just need to know if it’s normal for sanity's sake.

Thanks!

*Expert not included.
post #2 of 17
Congrats on the new boards!

Given your questions, I'd suggest taking them in to have them properly set and tested by a certified tech. You haven't given enough data to recommend a DIN setting, and the other questions are a bit concerning to me. Just take 'em in, if you can.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

I don't want to waste time in a ski shop

I've seen guys behind a counter adjust beindings numerous time and there doesn't appear to be a secret skill required.

It's been a while, but other than the type of skier you are, your height, weight, and possibly age what else is there? This information must conform to a some published scale that ski techs use to fiddle with a couple screws.

So using that. I'd be a Type III skier, 160lbs, 6' tall, age 36, Virgo.

Anyone?
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by fyton2v
I've seen guys behind a counter adjust beindings numerous time and there doesn't appear to be a secret skill required.

It's been a while, but other than the type of skier you are, your height, weight, and possibly age what else is there? This information must conform to a some published scale that ski techs use to fiddle with a couple screws.

So using that. I'd be a Type III skier, 160lbs, 6' tall, age 36, Virgo.

Anyone?
I doubt you will get anybody here to give you a DIN suggestion. That isn't a wise thing for anybody to do, especially online.

I can however tell you MY DIN setting. I'm just under 160 lbs, 5'5","Type III", age 40 (I don't think it matters though) and mine is set at 6.

The fact that you had to tell us your sign may mean you need to drop one setting from what the shop sets you at. :
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattL
I doubt you will get anybody here to give you a DIN suggestion. That isn't a wise thing for anybody to do, especially online.

I can however tell you MY DIN setting. I'm just under 160 lbs, 5'5","Type III", age 40 (I don't think it matters though) and mine is set at 6.

The fact that you had to tell us your sign may mean you need to drop one setting from what the shop sets you at. :

Bring it to a shop.

You need to factor in your boot shell size to get a proper din setting.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizzlyFD
Bring it to a shop.

You need to factor in your boot shell size to get a proper din setting.
Agreed.

A release check is always a good idea as well.
post #7 of 17
Agreed as well, hence my reference to what the shop sets him at in my last (sarcastic) remark

There have been times when a I felt a shop set me too high and lowered my own setting though. I like my skis to come off before my ACL. Just personal preference.
post #8 of 17
By the way there shouldn't be any play in the toe piece at the rails. Have the shop check that out while you are there as well.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Not trying to be a hero. Bindings are simple devices and by all appearances require next to 0 real skill to adjust. There must be simple documented guidelines as to how to go about the adjustment process. I may be missing something, but I don't see why a kid at Sport Chalet needs to do this for me.

Thanks.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by fyton2v
Not trying to be a hero. Bindings are simple devices and by all appearances require next to 0 real skill to adjust. There must be simple documented guidelines as to how to go about the adjustment process. I may be missing something, but I don't see why a kid at Sport Chalet needs to do this for me.

Thanks.
liability! Go to a shop!
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by fyton2v
Not trying to be a hero. Bindings are simple devices and by all appearances require next to 0 real skill to adjust. There must be simple documented guidelines as to how to go about the adjustment process. I may be missing something, but I don't see why a kid at Sport Chalet needs to do this for me.

Thanks.
Because the binding has to be set properly to the length of the boot and then release tested. You MAY be able to do the first but probably not without any experience and someone there to check your work, and you certainly can't do the second.

No one will give you advice because you're likely to hurt yourself.

And no, bindings are not simple devices.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by fyton2v
Not trying to be a hero. Bindings are simple devices and by all appearances require next to 0 real skill to adjust. There must be simple documented guidelines as to how to go about the adjustment process. I may be missing something, but I don't see why a kid at Sport Chalet needs to do this for me.

Thanks.
I would try to make sure that someone experienced does it. Ask who is available. They should be "certified". If you do end up with someone you think is new, take a look at the DIN when they are done. If it is 4 or less or 10 or more you know something is probably wrong with that....ask for them to have someone else double check it.

Alot of shops will do it for free as a courtesy.
post #13 of 17
Our shop does this check for free every day (i.e. DIN/ Forward pressure/ simple function, return to center). Any shop that wants your return business should/will do it for free. FREE is cheeper than any MRI I've heard of. They shouldn't charge you a mounting fee for those bindings, may be a small labor charge. They will charge you for a Torque/ Full Function test if that is what you want. A torque test should really be performed on all new bindings, and at the start of every ski season. This again is cheeper than your co-pay will be on an ACL tear if you try to set then up yourself.

James
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the info. It's not about the money for me (as far as binding adjustment is concerned). It's about convenience. I have very little free time and getting to a shop is a PITA. I'm really big on DIY because it's faster and way more convenient. Also, the DIY part is fun and you can sometimes save a whole lot of money depending on the project and you don't have to rely on people. In this case I'll run around from shop to shop when I'm up at Mammoth in a couple weeks and hopefully find someplace willing to do the work on the spot. That could suck.

As far as ski tuning/binding maintenance is concerned... this seems like something where all the ins-and-outs can be learned in a very short period of time; at least to serve the needs of 95% of the skiing population. It'd be a nice bit of knowledge and very convenient to know.

I'll admit that I'm coming from a somewhat ignorant position on this, but I've seen nothing in the posts above, or from ski techs in shops, that indicate this is something that shouldn't be done at home. I guess if you want to sue somebody that makes a mistake than that's OK, but it's not going to make your knee feel better. Bindings are complicated? How so? The science behind them is complicated but to put that into use for 95% of the skiing population can not complicated. In my view this is a similar situation to getting your bike tuned up at a bike shop. The bike shop guys say the same thing. "We need to do this for you. Bikes are complicated these days and the gears are sensitive." BS. It's simple and requires next to zero training.

Somebody convince me that proper binding adjustment, for your Type I, II, and III skiers, requires a lot of time to learn and should never be attempted at home. Even though it may not seem so I have a pretty open mind and I certainly don't want to hurt myself. I just want to understand the process.

Thanks again for the info.
post #15 of 17
May be look at the cost of having the binding installed by the shop. Hink of it as, its better then the co-pay are the ER.

May be the shop will let you watch so you can do your own next time. I have been skiing for years and tune my own and close friends skis. But when it comes to the safety of the bindings. I'll take them to the shop. I have adjusted bindings but to do the install, that's left to the Pro's.


Make the effort to take them in. It's much less of a PITA then spending time in the Hospital.

Unless you like being woken up at 2AM to take your temp.
post #16 of 17
I agree with all above and the following information is not intended to be a recommendation that you DIY, but, hey, why not understand whats going on, right? Besides, the day will come when you need to check your settings. A final word before we proceed. I don't have a clue what I'm talking about, have no association with the skiing industry, and you should not consider this advice or do this on your own. This is the internet and you should not necessarily believe what you read, because it might just be worth what you paid for it.

You can google "marker din chart" and find the top secret settings you are looking for. Heck, I got 153,000 results, and the first one looked fine. You or your tech need to know weight, height, skier type, age and boot sole length. The Marker AT binding is simply slid onto the rails of the ski and locked in place with a pin. It is essential the pin be turned inserted with the slot horizontal, then turned to the vertical locked position. Check that the binding is locked and pin cannot be pushed out. Boot sole length is approximated by the scale on the binding. To set the approximate length, the locking tab is pulled out to the left, and the length dial turned to set. The boot is placed in the binding and locked down. There is a piston at the center-rear of the heel, below the DIN setting screw, that has a triangular arrow on it that is used to visually check forward pressure. The arrow should be halfway into the heel housing. If it is fully exposed, there is not enough forward pressure and you need to shorten the binding one notch. Similarly if it is buried in the housing, you need to back off a notch. Lock the setting by pushing the tab back in. Now the tech sets the DIN using a posidrive #3 bit to the setting determined from the chart. The setting screws are in the front center of the toe piece and the center of the heel just above the forward pressure indicator. The customer often makes changes to this generally recommended setting based on exerience on the hill. Start conservatively at a low DIN and move up only if necessary to prevent unnecessary releases.

There it is, the big secret is out. What you do with it, is up to you. Many of us use mulitple boots or swap skis. You need to know this stuff in case you are the type that take such life-threatening chances. :

If you need to mount PCOS pistons...well, ask the tech you are working with. And one last thing...Can I sign your cast?
post #17 of 17
You right, it is not a hard to process learn. It is like wiring an electrical socket, an easy task if you've know how to do it, but but if you do it wrong it can have a bad out come. Cirquerider covered how to do it, but you should still watch (closely) a tech do it once. Even if it is a PITA, that is how most DIY'ers learn. Also check a more curent chart than the ones you can find on a google search, the one I find most is at least ten years old, and some things have changed.

James
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