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Inside/Uphill Ski Pressure

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Help, I can pressure my uphill ski i.e., when crossing the hill or between initiation phases on turning. I leave 2 arks in the snow but it just doesn't feel right to me. Clinician yesterday said approx. 70% - 30% I feel like I'm at he most 90-10, I learned to ski mainly with racing and 1 ski was it then. I'm trying to integrate some of the new skiing into my technique. I've tried more ankle, more knee and I am either doing it wrong or something. HELP anyone have any suggestions KIS. Thanks
post #2 of 15
try Shankles (shin ankles) at 10:00 and 2:00

also try very slow turns on very flat runs with the feet wider than hip width. No need to make complete turns just yet, just get used to being as close to 50-50 and making RR track arcs. You might also try on turning only on the "outside" edge. IE: right turn on the right ski only balanced on the right edge, Left turn on the left ski balanced on the left edge. If you are not engaging the tips of your skis (by pressing forward with your shin) Your ski will not turn.. Be forwarned! Plan on falling over several times when you first start trying this.
post #3 of 15
Ski faster, fast enough that you need the other ski to contribute or you will overpower the ski or the snow, and work your way up. It's pretty hard to judge with one leg bent more than the other.
post #4 of 15
The goal isn't to ski 30/70. It's to always ski both skis. You should be 50/50 during the transition between turns. Then, depending upon circumstances, the pressuring ranges progressively (or regressively) through 60/40, 70/30, 80/20 to as much as 99/01 and back through the same range to 50/50. Air time is equally 00/00, of course.
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
The goal isn't to ski 30/70. It's to always ski both skis. You should be 50/50 during the transition between turns. Then, depending upon circumstances, the pressuring ranges progressively (or regressively) through 60/40, 70/30, 80/20 to as much as 99/01 and back through the same range to 50/50. Air time is equally 00/00, of course.
That's it. I would say so long as you have the ability to manage/change the amount of pressure on the inside ski (by flexing the knee and ankle) then you are fine. As Kneale said, it isn't a hard and fast rule, it changes depending on slope, snow and the types of turns we are making. Do what feels right, and it most likely is....

L
post #6 of 15

Separation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho
Help, I can pressure my uphill ski i.e., when crossing the hill or between initiation phases on turning. I leave 2 arks in the snow but it just doesn't feel right to me. Clinician yesterday said approx. 70% - 30% I feel like I'm at he most 90-10, I learned to ski mainly with racing and 1 ski was it then. I'm trying to integrate some of the new skiing into my technique. I've tried more ankle, more knee and I am either doing it wrong or something. HELP anyone have any suggestions KIS. Thanks
I am not an instructor. I also have a difficult time communicating what I feel on the snow, but here goes. I know exactly how you feel. This is the stage I was at two years ago. I would ski a series of arcs, stop, look back at my tracks and see nice railroad tracks. However, I never really felt as though my inside ski was active in the turn, it just sorta came along for the ride.

After spending a Summer watching countless hours of WC skiers, both free skiing and race footage, I came to the realization that I just wasn't getting enough separation. Once I learned to let my skis get out from under me, this was very disconcerting at first, it became much easier to roll my inside ankle into the turn. When it happens for the first time and you feel that inside ski bend and arc quickly through the turn, it is quite a revelation. I hope this makes sense.

Good luck.
post #7 of 15
Also... you may wish to try some one ski skiing making turns in both directions on your left ski and then again on your right ski, just lift the ski not in use off the snow and try to keep it parallel to the snow surface.

It will be very uncomfortable at first but as you improve you will then know how to re-distribute your wieght from ski to ski at any point from transition to transition.

Good Luck! I'm actively doing this myself and it is working.
post #8 of 15

Exercise May Help

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho
Help, I can pressure my uphill ski i.e., when crossing the hill or between initiation phases on turning. I leave 2 arks in the snow but it just doesn't feel right to me. Clinician yesterday said approx. 70% - 30% I feel like I'm at he most 90-10, I learned to ski mainly with racing and 1 ski was it then. I'm trying to integrate some of the new skiing into my technique. I've tried more ankle, more knee and I am either doing it wrong or something. HELP anyone have any suggestions KIS. Thanks
On a green/blue groomed slope traverse at about a 60 degrees out of the fall line, pick up your outside ski, initiate your turn with your inside ski (you are initiating your turn using your outside edge of your inside ski), and just before the fall line set down your outside ski and complete your turn and then the opposite side and keep repeating. If you can not accomplish the exercise look at how you are flowing towards the direction of the turn with your CM. This may help you get use to feeling the use of your inside ski as a tool along with your taught habit of pressuring onto the outside ski.

John
post #9 of 15
You only NEED weight on both skis for unsupportive snow...powder, etc. Otherwise, ski so you feel good about it.


Ken
post #10 of 15
Pete,
The turns you are describing sound like slalom turns. Your stance must be wide, your timing must be patient and not rushed, and your skis should be 13m or so side cut. You need to also rotate the inside ski along it's sidecut by rotating your femor using the abductor, rotary muscle group.
Hope this is "kis".

RW
post #11 of 15
I've been playing with two-footed drills since early November, and I can feel the difference already. What I'm wondering is, what could be the cause (and is this a bad thing?) of tracks that come close to converging at the transition point? I'm laying down RR tracks in the snow, but many of them narrow to 12-14" as I transition to the next turn. Any ideas?
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 

Inside Ski Edge/pressure

Thanks everybody, I like shankles tip and the drills should really help. Epic is really a worthwhile source. thankyou everyone!!!!
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
Ski faster, fast enough that you need the other ski to contribute or you will overpower the ski or the snow, and work your way up. It's pretty hard to judge with one leg bent more than the other.
Ghost, skiing faster is a great way to cover up mistakes, in my experience. I'd say that he should work on fixing the problem at slower speeds, then speed up as his technique improves.
post #14 of 15
My biggest revelation came from my race coach who said the bast way to make a seamless carving transition was to step onto the inside ski's outside edge and simultaneously commit my CM aggressively down the fall line. It was a miracle! Now that's all I have to think of and everything else happens automatically for me. This action gets the new outside ski carving at the very top of the turn, gets the skis out from under my body early, and sets up a rock-solid edge for the rest of the turn.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
I've been playing with two-footed drills since early November, and I can feel the difference already. What I'm wondering is, what could be the cause (and is this a bad thing?) of tracks that come close to converging at the transition point? I'm laying down RR tracks in the snow, but many of them narrow to 12-14" as I transition to the next turn. Any ideas?
Converging/Diverging tracks are not always a detriment. I used to worry about it if my tracks came together in transition, but sometimes it is just the nature of the transition. 12-14" sounds like it really isn't a crisis. Probably you're using a cross over transition. If you use only a cross through or a cross under (especially) you may find that your skis maintain their vertical seperation (sorry PMTS term). Going too wide is something that will hinder your ability to move in transition, while too narrow will end up doing the same thing while affecting stability. As long as you're stable you should be okay. Have someone watch you ski, or get video of you skiing, and see if you have any problems originating from the transition. don't fix it if it isn't broken.

Later

GREG
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