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Ice Skating

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I am 44 now and had both knees operated on almost 27 years ago. By today's standards, they might as well have put leeches on me and said some incantations, but I digress...

I just got back on the ice this past week and am surprised more people aren't suggesting this as a great conditioning excercise. Look up the Public Skate times at your local University rink and pay the 3 bucks to rent some skates.

Go.
post #2 of 21
I rollerblade and will start skating. It helps my skiing tremendously. The balance, coordination and effort are similar to skiing.

If the local ski hill is inconvenient or just a bunny hill, consider skating. A skier can help himself get into shape with great results.

Cheers,

Michael
post #3 of 21

Great For Little Kids Too

Ice skating is a great way to teach kids the balance they will need when they first start skiing. And if you're near an indoor rink, your kids can do it year round.
post #4 of 21
Interesting this just came up. I just attended my first pro hockey game and was totally amazed with the moves I saw these guys make.

I watched their skating so intensly for the first period I never saw the game ! The mechanics are almost identical to those we use skiing.
post #5 of 21

Winter Sports

As a background I started skating soon after walking. My skiing commenced later than that but earlier than most people in my region. I've been skating more lately. I hadn't played Hockey in 30 years, but started in a Senior league this season. One does use different muscles with each activity. It's often easy to spot those skiers who come from a Hockey background when they are on the slopes, too. I really can't see how you can see ski technique in pro hockey. Skating prabably demands more of a sense of balance than skiing, but if you introduce your kids to skating and they love it, you may not want to see them get into downhill skiing. I have spent all together too much time driving to the mountains in order to ski. I learned how to ski cross country so that I didn't have to leave home to ski. It would be better to introduce your children to cross country skiing while skating. It is less expensive for sure.
post #6 of 21
I grew up skating on the backyard pond. I remember our home grown version of surfacing the ice was to connect all the hoses we could get our hands on from the house to the pond. Then we'd set the flow to a tiny steam of water. By morning we'd have a new surface.

I'm now a skate skier since I have access to miles of groomed skate track just blocks from the house. I've been hooked on skate and classic track for several years. It's a great workout but not much technique crossover for nordic downhill, snowboard and alpine.
post #7 of 21
Dad made me pick skating or skiing after my first ski season. We lived 5 minutes from our local hill, and the choice was easy for me. I've been skiing ever since.

I go back and skate once in a while, and find that the movements are very comparable. More so if I work at some of them. My skating definitely helps my skiing, but I'd much rather ski than skate!
post #8 of 21
This thread has got me thinking of getting on the ice again. Like many here, I grew up skating in the backyard (gosh, remember double runner skates??) with my family and at local ponds playing ice hockey. Bones and joints are a bit more fragile now, but I'd think anything that requires your feet to move, leg strength, and good ol' cardiovascular efforts would be good for aspiring skiers. I'm inspired!
post #9 of 21

Skating and Skiing.

Snow skating or skate skiing appealed to me when it was first introduced as I was adept at both X-C and ice skating. It gave me loads of enjoyment and I still do it. I found, though, that toe hinging or for me the SNS binding system puts too much stress on my knees so I have been using an old ultra lite Delrin 3-pin made by Track with which I can skate. You don't need to invest in the fancy skating equipment to start ski skating, either. Your poling will be most important. Two long poles, light skiis and ankle high touring boots work for me now. Back to ice skating, they now start kids off with regular skates and milk crates for support. They push the milk crates across the ice.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
I found, though, that toe hinging or for me the SNS binding system puts too much stress on my knees so I have been using an old ultra lite Delrin 3-pin made by Track with which I can skate. You don't need to invest in the fancy skating equipment to start ski skating, either. Your poling will be most important. Two long poles, light skiis and ankle high touring boots work for me now.
Your knee pain as it relates to the SNS skate binding is a peculiar relationship. The stress on the knee during skating would be limited to the skate motion while your entire boot's sole is in contact with the ski and binding. At that point, a bindings connection design isn't going to become a factor.

The only time the boot hinges freely on the toe bar is when the boot is lifted off the ski and the ski is subsequently lifted off the snow. At that point there is practically no stress on the knee joint unless perhaps the skier might be flailing about because their balance was lost.

Perhaps your technique or your gear are in need of some attention. XC is about as low impact as one can get.

I would seak the advice of an orthopedist. At your age... who knows. Best of luck with your knees.

IMO, Poling would be secondary to the motion of the feet and legs. While learning to skate ski, the instructor will emphasize the skating motion sans poles. Then the introduction of V1, V2 and V2-Alternate are taught.
post #11 of 21
Great post by Seven. One can skate without any knee twist. I'm 50 and am missing one ACL and ski skating is one of the easiest sports on my knee. Get some good skating boots with balanced orthodics and your knee will probably feel much better.
post #12 of 21

Ice Skating

New here first post and YES ice skating does help .
I just got back on the hill last Tues after 20 odd years
Also rollerblade
Got the skates parallel and practiced at our local rink every public skate i could go to
took me about 1/2 hr to get outta my snowplough skiing and into the down and out swoosh .

Luv it , I am back into it skate , ski , & bladin till I can't walk no more :
post #13 of 21

Alas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog
Great post by Seven. One can skate without any knee twist. I'm 50 and am missing one ACL and ski skating is one of the easiest sports on my knee. Get some good skating boots with balanced orthodics and your knee will probably feel much better.
Sorry, but I no longer have any complaints about my knees. The trouble wasn't knee twist, too. I don't need all that fancy equipment that they sold you. Anything Seven posts I don't read, either. I'm perfectly happy with my 3 pins and can skate rings around most other skiers. The only regret I have would be that there wasn't enough snow left after last night's storm to ski out there. On top of that the kids took over the ice rink last week and they bumped us seniors off. I'll be skiing DH Tuesday, though. I might be able to get in some X-C after driving up to the mountains on Mon., however. Wednesday it's back to ice skating and Thursday, it's hockey. Thank god the kids are back in school!!!!
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
. I don't need all that fancy equipment that they sold you. Anything Seven posts I don't read, either. I'm perfectly happy with my 3 pins and can skate rings around most other skiers. !!
Great. There are cyclists who can make a 45 lb full suspension mountain bike go faster than some people can pedal a road bike. but that doesn't make it a smart choice for a road ride. You might try some real skating gear and learn some real fun from the skaters you can't skate rings around.

PS: "They" didn't sell me any fancy gear. I use US and Canadian Ski Team hand me downs.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog
Great. There are cyclists who can make a 45 lb full suspension mountain bike go faster than some people can pedal a road bike. but that doesn't make it a smart choice for a road ride. You might try some real skating gear and learn some real fun from the skaters you can't skate rings around.
Sorry, for some reason I didn't get through to you. I am a retired ski industry professional. I was skate skiing on some real gear when many here were in diapers.
post #16 of 21
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
I was skate skiing on some real gear when many here were in diapers.
...will you still be skating on your real gear when you are in diapers again?
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven
Great picture! I've done the race six times myself, both skating and classic, My best finish was 35th (out of 5000 skiers), but my skis have been in the top three. Probably we could still learn a lot from AT skier and his clunky gear.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog
Great picture! I've done the race six times myself, both skating and classic, My best finish was 35th (out of 5000 skiers), but my skis have been in the top three. Probably we could still learn a lot from AT skier and his clunky gear.
That's awesome. You are a nordic animal.
post #20 of 21
I was a competative figure skater as a child and still can pull off spins and the odd axel here and there. I would agree that Skiing is incredibly similar to skating with three exceptions.
Skaters "get around" alot via cross overs and stroking. Skiers (except on flats) don't because the slope takes them and cross overs are impossible due to ski length.
Skaters spend alot of time on their outside edges moving forward which I've learned is pretty much a ticket to falling in skiing.
And of course the hill has an influence on your speed in a way an ice rink never can.

For me the transition that's been tricky has been going past a blue to a black hill. Its unclear whether its psychological -ie, I get scared faced with a certain amount of slope and lean back or whether its a processing speed problem, like I'm just too darned slow to stay on top of my skiis after a certain angle, but my problems seem to come once I get onto a certain amount of slope.

Oh and the ice is much more consistent and smooth in a rink with good compressors and a reasonable zamboni than the snow is. Maybe Hans Brinker had moguls to worry about but Peggy Flemming never did.
post #21 of 21

Skate Technique

Bill Koch demonstrated that the skating technique was a viable X-C race technique without specialized equipment by winning a silver Olympic medal. He had lost his wax and started skating in the middle of the race. If you aren't racing or spending a lot of time on groomed skating track, you can find suitable 3-pin/touring boot/ski equipment with which to skate. That picture of Seven's captures the essence of techno-nerd skiing. It's snowing out my window right now, I might see enough to put in my first day of x-c today. However, I was on ice skates today although I thought my ankle has healed fully. If had an easy session, but found I was wrong. My injury hasn't healed fully. My calf is swollen today. I felt the skating in both ankles and my knees. No serious pain, however. I won't be back in the rink for a while. Nevertheless, if it snows, I'll ski. Skating puts much more strain on the ankles than skiing diagonal stride does. Although it causes swelling, walking has been good for my calf. Consequently, I figure the cross country will be o.k. if I go easy. As to going from ice skating to skiing, it does take much different skills to downhill ski than it does to ice skate. I started doing both early in life, but skiing only in my teens. You can pick out the hockey players on the slopes by the way the ski. It does take a while to over-come the differences that gravity throws your way.
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