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How many levels

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
How many levels are there in skiing lesson over in america, im just curious since over here in ireland we do it differently,

A1,A2,A3,A4,A5 are all beginers
B1,B2,B3,B4,B5 are all beginners to intermedia
C1,C2,C3,C4,C5 are all intermedia
D1,D2,D3,D4,D5 are all intermedia to expert
E1,E2,E3,E4,E5 are all expert



just wondering what your way of lessons go
post #2 of 16
I found this on Bristol's website

Level 1 - Congratulations as a first time skier after a half/full day lesson you will be equipped with basic skills to enjoy the sport. This investment will last a lifetime!

Level 2 - You will be able to stop on green runs using the wedge or "snowplow" and be able to make direction changes.


Level 3
- You are able to stop and link wedge turns on green runs comfortably.

Level 4
- You rely more on turn shape to slow down. Your wedge is getting smaller and at the finish of a turn your skis are running parallel, which is a major milestone!

Level 5
- You are using similar wedge-match to parallel techniques to the level 4 skier but are more comfortable on blue runs

Level 6 - Your wedge (or stem) is nearly gone and you are making open parallel turns on blue runs.


Level 7
- You are able to change turn radius and duration comfortably on blue runs. Pole plants are being used to time turns. Blue/black runs are starting to look skiable.

Level 8
- You are comfortable on blue/black runs and can ski in the fall line on easy moguls

Level 9 - You can ski black diamond bumps, steeps, and varied snow conditions comfortably.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
only 9 levels, are these nine lessons then? Like nine days?
post #4 of 16
It seems like our systems are very different. Can you please tell me more about yours?

The levels are just a way of organizing groups and assigning an instructor. Instructors are certified to teach different levels.

The instructor skis with with student and makes a judgement call on what to work on. We don't have specific lesson plans for each level. Some people advance more quickly then others.
post #5 of 16
Many resorts don't even post all the level's. Sugarbowl for instance at the learning center meeting area we put up signs for first timers, novice, and beyond. the rest of the evaluation is done by interviewing and talking with the guest, then going out for a quick evaluation run.

DC
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
Many resorts don't even post all the level's. Sugarbowl for instance at the learning center meeting area we put up signs for first timers, novice, and beyond. the rest of the evaluation is done by interviewing and talking with the guest, then going out for a quick evaluation run.

DC
That's exactly how Alta does it. Why? Well let's say you come to the "level 4" calss and after talking with you/seeing you ski we decide that you really belong in a "level 3" class. That quantifible number naturally makes folks put themselves in a category. When we "demote" them, it makes them feel worse about themselves, than a more descriptive lesson title.

http://www.alta.com/pages/adult.php
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Well in ireland it goes at a,b,c,d,e. Each lesson is two hours long so there would be a total of 50 hours of skiing, and this is all done on dry slopes, and you learn very quickly not to fall if you want your fingers intack. The intrucster shows the students how to ski to there level and give us plenty of warnings. We usualy have one lesson a week, and you can finish the entire course in 25 weeks, which usualy takes, 6 and a half months which in ireland is one season.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theo
Well in ireland it goes at a,b,c,d,e. Each lesson is two hours long so there would be a total of 50 hours of skiing, and this is all done on dry slopes, and you learn very quickly not to fall if you want your fingers intack. The intrucster shows the students how to ski to there level and give us plenty of warnings. We usualy have one lesson a week, and you can finish the entire course in 25 weeks, which usualy takes, 6 and a half months which in ireland is one season.
So you're saying if I go to ireland and take 25 lessons on dry slopes, I'll be an expert? Hummmm?????

L
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie
So you're saying if I go to ireland and take 25 lessons on dry slopes, I'll be an expert? Hummmm?????

L

yes Lonnie

anyone can be an expert!

I'm taking swimming lessons here (to help surfing paddling)....
In Oz I'd call myself a non-swimmer & be pretty close.... over here I'm the star of the "intermediate" class - because I'm the only one not scared of water over my head (damn it I grew up at a surf beach.... I just don't move forward well swimming freestyle & backstroke works badly through surf)

As I'm telling my australian friend who is terrified of water but just learnt to swim 25 metres - she just needs to relocate... here she would be a star swimmer! & her fear factor would seem well controlled!

I thought about giving the dryslope a burl.... but I'm told it is a 4 hour drive from here & for dryslope I think I'd rather hop on a plane & visit Fox & Milton keynes! At least it IS frozen water...
post #10 of 16
post #11 of 16

Aaaahhhhhhh!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
Skiing without snow is like beer without alcohol!
post #12 of 16
worse I think - at least alcamahol free beer is still wet.....

sort of like drinking a glass of sand it would be!

An indoor slope I can understand... small, flatish.... but still snow..... but why do they spend weeks on end on dryslopes?

I tried to find out about doing a weekend... but from memory they insisted I take a "course" rather than just a lesson or go for a ski.... (or did they not answer & I just got that idea... oh well I gave up)....

Surfing in Ireland looks more doable than skiing here!
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theo
only 9 levels, are these nine lessons then? Like nine days?

If you take nine piano lessons, are you ready to perform professionally?
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
lol dry slopes are not that bad, we dont get snow in ireland so its the nearest thing to snow, and trust me you really would not like to fall on those slopes, people brake there fingers all the time, but the slopes are getting extended thankfully, i knew how to ski before doing lessons there and every year i go off and do new lessons in different countries for a week, just to either update my technique or see how it is in each countrie
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theo
i knew how to ski before doing lessons there

well you're way ahead of me..... something in the order of 3500 lessons and I am still learning to ski.... Someday I may work it out a bit....
post #16 of 16
Theo,

I've had some Irish dry skiers of C5 to D5, and on real snow and a mountain envyorment, they translate to about a level 4. A true level 9 here takes years and a lot of instruction to accomplish. A true level 9 can ski anything, any conditions, any time, any where. A true expert skier.

RW
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