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Ironing

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Need to do some ironing.

A question that I haven't seen addressed in all the waxing/ironing threads.
When ironing should you put pressure on the iron to 'force' the melted wax into the base or just 'float' the iron over the melted wax on the skis?

I've been doing the float method but it doesn't seem like my wax is staying on very long when I'm skiing - i.e. wax is gone after 1/2 day. Also - for scraping - really hard, hard, or just light?

thanks

Dave
post #2 of 26
the idea is to have the base saturated with wax and not to have barely if any wax on the base (baerly any visible) i float my iron over, then i brush with brass, then nylon for a long time till ther is nothing coming off then i brush it with fleece and the base will just look like its new if u grinded/sanded before waxing or if u have relativly new skiis.
post #3 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by staffpro
the idea is to have the base saturated with wax and not to have barely if any wax on the base (baerly any visible) i float my iron over, then i brush with brass, then nylon for a long time till ther is nothing coming off then i brush it with fleece and the base will just look like its new if u grinded/sanded before waxing or if u have relativly new skiis.
What is your wax application method?
post #4 of 26
When I started my own ironing, I don't think I worked the bases with the iron enough. I noticed that the wax didn't seem to stay on the bases very long.

Now I still "float" the iron, but move it more slowly. I also keep ironing until the whole length of the base is covered with molten wax - not just the few inches behind the iron. This shows me that the bases themselves have been warmed up by the iron, so the wax stays liquid longer and gets deeper into the structure as a result.
post #5 of 26
No starch, please.


Pressing down won't do anything.
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by marc gledhill
When I started my own ironing, I don't think I worked the bases with the iron enough. I noticed that the wax didn't seem to stay on the bases very long.

Now I still "float" the iron, but move it more slowly. I also keep ironing until the whole length of the base is covered with molten wax - not just the few inches behind the iron. This shows me that the bases themselves have been warmed up by the iron, so the wax stays liquid longer and gets deeper into the structure as a result.
Unless it's a warm wax it should only be liquified for a slight period of time behind the iron.

If your ski is so hot that it keeps the wax in liquid form then you are probably overheating your ski. If you can feel the top of your ski being pretty warm then that is not a good thing.

Try upping your iron temp rather then moving more slowly.

If you find wax not to be absorbing well, then iron and let it cool. Then iron it in again.

The swix website is a good reference for seeing this. Check out the Alpine-racing-new skis-base prep

http://www.swixschool.no/
post #7 of 26
With practice I've gotten to be able to very slowly and with a slight upward pull on the iron, get a full width melt a few inches behind the iron. I usually only make this one pass. It is very satisfying to get this right and to not have to go back over areas that didn't get melted.

I agree with Scalce about not doing too much heating.
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by staffpro
the idea is to have the base saturated with wax and not to have barely if any wax on the base (baerly any visible) i float my iron over, then i brush with brass, then nylon for a long time till ther is nothing coming off then i brush it with fleece and the base will just look like its new if u grinded/sanded before waxing or if u have relativly new skiis.
You don't scrape? Does anyone have a link to that thread which was exclusively about waxing from start to finish, including all or most of the tools needed? I can't find the thing.

Also, is it a good idea to do a couple of warm scrapes, then let a final wax coat sit over-night before doing a final scrape, brush and soft wipe? I guess what I'm trying to ask is what is the best way to get full wax saturation into your bases? Thanks!
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by VASKI244
You don't scrape? Does anyone have a link to that thread which was exclusively about waxing from start to finish, including all or most of the tools needed? I can't find the thing.

Also, is it a good idea to do a couple of warm scrapes, then let a final wax coat sit over-night before doing a final scrape, brush and soft wipe? I guess what I'm trying to ask is what is the best way to get full wax saturation into your bases? Thanks!
As to warm scrape, a good way to clean the base is to hot wax with a base prep wax, scrape off right away, then do the same thing 2 or more times until the scrapings come off clean.

My normal wax procedure:

Drip wax on

Melt in with one slow pass of the iron

Wait 1/2 hour or more.

Scrape off edges of wax.

Scrape base with sharp plastic scraper. Sharpen a lot, I use a panzar file screwed down to my bench. Also have a burnishing tool. A sharp scraper makes all the difference in the world.

Brush off the base with a paint brush

Brass brush to get most of the remaining wax out ending with one full length pass.

Brush off the base with a paint brush

Horsehair brush to get out the rest and to polish.

Brush off the base with a paint brush

I then use a swix nylon finish brush, but think it's probably unnecessary.

Use the paint brush to wipe off any wax around the bindings.

Put on two straps one at each contact point to protect my work.

Go skiing.
post #10 of 26
I stop at the final horsehair.
post #11 of 26
Iron: Float.

Scrape: Hard.

If you press down hard on the iron, I don't think you'll "push" the wax into the base ... rather, you'll just squeeze the wax out from between the iron and the base, which won't do anything good and could do something bad.
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by VASKI244
You don't scrape? Does anyone have a link to that thread which was exclusively about waxing from start to finish, including all or most of the tools needed? I can't find the thing.

Also, is it a good idea to do a couple of warm scrapes, then let a final wax coat sit over-night before doing a final scrape, brush and soft wipe? I guess what I'm trying to ask is what is the best way to get full wax saturation into your bases? Thanks!
TRY SWIX.COM AND TOGNAR.COM
post #13 of 26
My routine is to warm the ski with the iron and rub on the wax, then iron it in. I never scrape. I brush vigorously after the base cools.

I'm not a racer. I'm a ski instructor. I like my skis to glide and slide smoothly. I'm not after "fast". My process takes five-six minutes each morning. Unless I'm filing. Then it's considerably longer.
post #14 of 26
I have my wife do my ironing. She gets the collars straighter than I can!
post #15 of 26
I've just finished waxing the skis; and yes the top sheets do feel warm when I've finished. Not hot, but they are nicely warmed.

Does this mean I could be overheating the ski?
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by marc gledhill
I've just finished waxing the skis; and yes the top sheets do feel warm when I've finished. Not hot, but they are nicely warmed.

Does this mean I could be overheating the ski?
IMHO yes. I sometimes feel a little warmth on the tops, but often none.

PTEX can be burned easily. I suggest just melting the wax in , not trying too hard, just get it spread evenly.

Do it every time you ski or close to it. Be gentle to your bases. If they start getting white areas that may be base burn. Only fix really is a stone grind then.

Once burned they lose their ability to hold wax. Go easy with the iron.
post #17 of 26
OK, thanks for the warning.
post #18 of 26
You're welcome.

I just went to the Swix school site that Scalce recommended. It's very good. They do three full length passes with the iron. (This is in the race wax area.)

It's also interesting how they have such different methods for recreational, sport and race waxing.
post #19 of 26

Wax Sequence

I first patch my bases with P'Tex if needed. Then I get into base waxing, then sharpening, then race waxing. Warming up the ski too much will cause it to delaminate. Rossi skis are really bad for this. Anyway, here's my sequence:

1. Brush with brass brush. Straight lines for cold and cross pattern for warm and wet conditions. This puts in the structure.

2. Wipe with the fleece sheet

3. Drip on base wax. I use Holmenkol Hydrocarbon (usually Beta mix)

4. Let stand for about 20 minutes

5. Scrap edges, then scrap bases. I keep my scraper sharp, and I press down hard.

6. I then use the horsehair brush. I will brush hard for about 20 strokes.

7. I then sharpen my edges. I will use the KUU competition bastard file, and usually only one or two passes (tip to tail).

8. I will wipe off any filings with the fleece cloth.

9. I will then use the diamond file, about 3-5 passes.

10. Use the fleece cloth to wipe off the filings.

11. Then I go back to the race wax. I will then put on the hi-fluro wax (Holmenkol Fx Hybrid). For my non-race skis, I will just do a second coat of the base wax.

12. After an hour, I will scrap the edges, then scrap the base until nothing is coming off.

13. I will then brush with a horsehair brush about 50 strokes. The first 20 or so brushes are pressed hard, but the next 30 or so are with lighter force.

I ski every Wednesday and Sunday, so I wax every Saturday night and wax and sharpen every Tuesday night. Also, for my non-race skis, I sharpen my edges every three weeks, but the race skis get it every week.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by VASKI244
You don't scrape? Does anyone have a link to that thread which was exclusively about waxing from start to finish, including all or most of the tools needed? I can't find the thing.

Also, is it a good idea to do a couple of warm scrapes, then let a final wax coat sit over-night before doing a final scrape, brush and soft wipe? I guess what I'm trying to ask is what is the best way to get full wax saturation into your bases? Thanks!
http://www.ski-racing.com/waxing.htm Offers a useful brief tutorial.

I try to let the last wax I apply sit overnight before scraping and brushing. It does have an impact on absorption.

There is a lot of weird science and voodoo to waxing but the basics are quite simple. Pick a wax system (e.g. Toko, Swix, Holmenkohl etc.), a decent iron and an approach that does not involve a lot of work and stick to it and you'll be good.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by waxwhizard
There is a very interesting article on waxing at

http://www.alpineskituning.com
It is a very interesting article indeed.

All I can say is that decades of ski racing tuning - all of which uses hot wax I believe - must have some data and/or reason to do it. But it is food for thought.
post #22 of 26
I do pretty much the same routine as most above. I have a friend that sprays his skis with "PAM"! Not to sure about that. :
post #23 of 26
Look at the Swix site mentioned above and go to the Tognar site. There's a lot of well-meaning mis-information posted here. Many of these tips or sequences are just plain wrong.
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by choucas
Look at the Swix site mentioned above and go to the Tognar site. There's a lot of well-meaning mis-information posted here. Many of these tips or sequences are just plain wrong.
What tips or sequences are you saying are wrong?
post #25 of 26
Not scraping, waxing before filing, only brushing not scraping, to name a few. Best to get and read the waxing/tuning guide from Swix (or your favorite wax co.) and/or check their website. Everyone develops his/her own techniques over time, but one is wise to start with the basics as outlined by the guys who work with wax and tuning tools everyday. I wouldn't rely on a posting on this board as gospel. Also, invest in good tools to do the job right. Get in the habit of tuning your skis. You'll get better at it the more you do it, and you will ski better too.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by choucas
Also, invest in good tools to do the job right. Get in the habit of tuning your skis. You'll get better at it the more you do it, and you will ski better too.
Also it's fun and very satisfying.
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