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Drilling and mounting bindings: how long until safe to ski?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
This is a question I can't seem to find a straight answer to: when drilling out a ski core to mount bindings, how long until it is safe to ski (assuming a wood core ski, using a wood glue or Roo Glue). I have heard everything from 30 minutes to 24 hours.
post #2 of 15
Dawg - why are you using wood glue to mount your bindings? I use the stuff that Tognar sells (it's Holmenkol Binding COL). Here's what they say:

"Use this glue when installing binding screws on skis. It lubricates the threads when they're being cranked down, and seal the hole to make it waterproof. It is a non-toxic, flexible anaerobic (dries in the hole without air) vinyl that is compatible with ski and snowboard core materials"

I've found that this stuff works really well. Nice tight hold, but not impossible to back out the screws if needed (without tearing up the ski core and topsheet).
post #3 of 15
I vote for "right away"
I personally don't use any glue and have never had any issues.
post #4 of 15
as long as it takes to get to the slopes.
post #5 of 15
Run! Do not walk to the nearest chairlift.
post #6 of 15
just do not use a water soluble glue. If the ski has metal or you are drilling a metal plate use a heavy grease- never glue.
post #7 of 15
vail99 - what are you smokin' buddy? There isn't a single binding manufacturer or ski manufacturer that recommends using "heavy grease" when mounting into a ski with a metal top sheet. Where are you getting this crap?
post #8 of 15
I add my vote for "right away" and for using wood glue as well.
post #9 of 15
Careful about what kind of wood glue you use. There are three types.

Most wood glues (like the white carpenters glue) are made of poly vinyl acetate (PVA). PVA glues are water soluable -- they'll wash off in time. In fact, water is used to clean up PVA glues.

There are some water resistant PVA glues, they are better than basic PVA, but not as good as true waterproof wood glues.

Waterproof wood glues are polyurethane based. Cleanup requires alcohol. They also expand when curing, so don't use too much.

So use wood glue? Yes. But avoid the PVA types.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching
to 24 hours.
I believe this to be a carryover/relic from the days of Fischer AirCore and similar cores where epoxy is called for. Some XC skiers still swear by this, and even by having the skis upside down as they cure so that the epoxy doesn't pool away from the screw.

Whatever. If they really cared they'd build a 140F+ hot box.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
vail99 - what are you smokin' buddy? There isn't a single binding manufacturer or ski manufacturer that recommends using "heavy grease" when mounting into a ski with a metal top sheet. Where are you getting this crap?
Every race tech I know uses grease with full metal plates as glue serves no function in that capacity and the grease lubricates the screw and provides as watertight seal. Saw it all day long at the race room at the BC WC's and Remember the glues main function is to lubricate initial mounating and provide a seal to some degreee for the core- especially wood cores hence the need for non water soluble glues. In metal to metal interaction grease provides an ideal solution.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by vail99
Every race tech I know uses grease with full metal plates as glue serves no function in that capacity and the grease lubricates the screw and provides as watertight seal. Saw it all day long at the race room at the BC WC's and Remember the glues main function is to lubricate initial mounating and provide a seal to some degreee for the core- especially wood cores hence the need for non water soluble glues. In metal to metal interaction grease provides an ideal solution.
Makes sense for tapped holes.
post #13 of 15
If you're not using any sort of glue, waiting a period of time after you mount the bindings isn't going to change anything.

My uncle gave me his old pair of Volant's and I remounted the binding to fit my big old boots. Filled the old holes with a combination of epoxy mixed with Scotch Brite pad pieces. Waited 24 hours. Drilled the new holes, filled the holes with epoxy, and then screwed the binding on. And no, I didn't tap the topsheet either, which some may say is a big no-no. I did screw in the screws without the bindings to make sure they went in straight and to lay down the initial threads. Those suckers aren't going anywhere, but then again, the skis and bindings are old so I wasn't worried about it being a permanent job.

Within 10 minutes the expoxy was set and the skis were probably ready to use. It was 5 minute cure epoxy, but I waited 24 hours anyways.
post #14 of 15

Welcome AaronK

Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronK
And no, I didn't tap the topsheet either, which some may say is a big no-no.
and here is why:


Quote:
I did screw in the screws without the bindings to make sure they went in straight and to lay down the initial threads.
Yes, it's those initial threads that are the trouble: the crack starts where the first thread starts.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Yes, it's those initial threads that are the trouble: the crack starts where the first thread starts.
Ouch....

I knew there was a chance of the screws threading and pulling up on the topsheet, which appears to be what started the crack in your picture, correct?

I just used a ton of pressure on the screw to make sure it was threading down into the core and not just pulling up. On a new or not so beat up set of skis I would have tapped, but I was cutting corners and luckily I got away with it.
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