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Folding brakes to tune?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Ok, I've just banged the crap out of my hand again folding up the brakes to tune my skis. How do you fold them up and keep yourself from getting cracked by them? In the case of the Neox, they have a lot of resistence, and then fold up with a snap. That's when I get hurt!
post #2 of 27
Well, never had much issue really, but I don't have any Neox either. I simply use a rubber band or two on my Markers and Look Pivots. The goofy kit I have also has one of those "boot dummy's" I can snap into the bindings, but I seldom use it.
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
I use a rubber band to hold it, but can't use it to pull the brake closed (too much force until it hits that "release point"). It hasn't been as bad in the past with other brakes, although I have done it occationally. Perhaps I just need to remember to use gloves... :
post #4 of 27
I traced the bottom of my boot on to a piece of Oak and rounded the edges. I click it into the bindings turn the ski over and put the wood in the vice....no more clamping the vice on the ski or plate and the brakes are retracted.
post #5 of 27

Neox brake folding

Hi: I found that I could press down on the stand plate with both thumbs and make the brake pop up, then use about 4 rubber bands to retain them ... on the brand new Neox 412s that I just mounted on my brand new M:EXs.

I might be just a bit excited about my new skis
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Ok, I've just banged the crap out of my hand again folding up the brakes to tune my skis. How do you fold them up and keep yourself from getting cracked by them? In the case of the Neox, they have a lot of resistence, and then fold up with a snap. That's when I get hurt!
I've got the new atomic bindings on my metrons and they are a bit difficult at first. I too have sliced my fingers on the edges. I have found that applying pressure to both brakes at the same time will generally be better than only one. Keep the fingers away from the sharp edges. Happy skiing!!!!!

Mark
post #7 of 27
I am a Salomon skier so I just pop off the brakes- 1 screw- otherwise I use heavy duty rubber bands- the best are vacuum cleaner drive belts- theare super strong.
post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie
I traced the bottom of my boot on to a piece of Oak and rounded the edges. I click it into the bindings turn the ski over and put the wood in the vice....no more clamping the vice on the ski or plate and the brakes are retracted.
Great idea!!
post #9 of 27
From a gadget king that has made every brake retaing clip imaginable, I still reverted to the rubber band. The best I found was a motorcycle innertube that you can custom cut to the desired width depending on the stiffness you want. Cut out a couple of dozen that I have all over the place. Lifetime supply, never a shortage.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie
I traced the bottom of my boot on to a piece of Oak and rounded the edges. I click it into the bindings turn the ski over and put the wood in the vice....no more clamping the vice on the ski or plate and the brakes are retracted.




Great idea!!
Sure is!

Thanks
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Ok, I've just banged the crap out of my hand again folding up the brakes to tune my skis. How do you fold them up and keep yourself from getting cracked by them? In the case of the Neox, they have a lot of resistence, and then fold up with a snap. That's when I get hurt!
I stand my b5's vertically on the bench, tips up. Put both thumbs on the lower edge of the stand plate & push. At the same time your left fingers then go around the ski & pull on the left brake lever. Same for the right fingers on the right brake lever. It's just a quick push/pull action & surprisingly little force is required.

Make sure that your fingers are extended around the levers so that when the brake suddenly 'gives' the ends your fingers hit the ski base & don't get pinched in the gaps between the edges & the levers.

The levers can then easily be raised fully up & a rubber band attached.

It's a lot easier to demo than explain.
post #12 of 27
I don't know about the newer ones but on my older Atomics I find that it doesn't work well at all to simply pull on them. I have to put a bit of pressure on the pad under the boots and kind of jimmy it. Its hard to describe but it works a lot better than pure force -- which you are right is really strong at first and then goes away immediatly which is a good recipe for dinging oneself up good. Just use a little trial and error playing with the pad while you lift up on the levers.
post #13 of 27
I ski Salomon too, and just take the brakes off, or I use a brake retainer device (bigthick rubberbad) that is sold at reliable. Atomic also used to make special metal horse shoe shaped peices for the old race bindings. You could fit this under the brakes and it would hold them up while tuning the skis. One of my team mates who skis only atomic uses them all the time. they work great. I am not sure if they will work for the new Neox or not though - nor do I know where you would find such a device.
Later
GREG
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Ok, I've just banged the crap out of my hand again folding up the brakes to tune my skis. How do you fold them up and keep yourself from getting cracked by them? In the case of the Neox, they have a lot of resistence, and then fold up with a snap. That's when I get hurt!
I know exactly what you mean. Those Neox brakes are dangerous, especially with those 3 - 1 degree bevel edges which can be pretty sharp. I have taken to always wearing an old leather work glove when I push those brakes up. Lost too much skin and blood pushing back Neox brakes without protection.
post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the ideas. UL, that's brilliant (I'd expect no less from you!). To be clear, the issue isn't retaining the brakes once they are folded, but actually folding them in the first place. About 70% of the time, I can do what Syderjon recommends. However, about 30% of the time, my fingers get caught between the brake and the edge, or the pressure changes so dramatically that I lose my grip and the brake slips and snaps back (which can also hurt!). This last time, I used a piece of PVC pipe to press on the tredle while the skis were flat on the bench and then just put the rubber bands on them. But, I did it while wearing gloves, too...
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
Atomic also used to make special metal horse shoe shaped peices for the old race bindings. You could fit this under the brakes and it would hold them up while tuning the skis. One of my team mates who skis only atomic uses them all the time. they work great. I am not sure if they will work for the new Neox or not though - nor do I know where you would find such a device.
Later
GREG
Those metal things are great. I use them all the time. They ship with the bindings so that the bindings will actually fit in the box. But yeah, I have no idea about the Neox.

-T
post #17 of 27

Romex

You will be surprised how well standard 3wire household Romex works. It is strong enough to hold a shape and malleable enough to be bent by hand around and over things like bindings. Easy breazy
post #18 of 27
I do what Lodro does.

The heal piece on all Atomics bindings (except Device) have rollers and a hump which needs to be cleared for the brakes to retract. This is why all that initial force is needed to pop the arms up.

On all my Atomics I do the following:

Initially push the brake arms in the opposite direction of them being retracted which causes the heal piece to slightly raise.

Then I stick the tip of my finger under the raised heal piece near the rollers to help guide it over the hump while pushing the brake slowly into the retracted position.

Essentially you rock the heal pad over the hump.

Just pushing the brake like you said causes alot of resistance and then none which results in cut knuckles.

I use a single heavy duty rubber band that you can get for cheap at Home Depot.

I don't use any gloves while tuning so I know this method works.
post #19 of 27
At one point I had bent up some heavy duty coat hanger wire in to a brake retention device. Worked quite well until I lost it. Now I use some wintersteiger rubber bands. They are wide, thick, durable and a perfect length. I think they want a few bucks for them, but I got them for free. When they break I will most likely go back to the coat hanger.
post #20 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by real9999
Those metal things are great. I use them all the time. They ship with the bindings so that the bindings will actually fit in the box. But yeah, I have no idea about the Neox.
The Neox ships with plastic ones that won't work after the heel is mounted into the track.
post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
Scalce, I'm going to have to try that; I'm away from the skis now, so can't go look, but that sounds like a great option...
post #22 of 27
This all sounds too complicated. All I do is put my ski on the ground, step on the brake and apply a few rubberbands I get off of asparagus or broccoli. If you're worried about the brake catching you when you remove the rubberbands then put the ski on the ground and step on the brake while you remove them.
post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
All I do is put my ski on the ground...
Doesn't that mess up the tune? :
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Doesn't that mess up the tune? :
I should have said carpet instead of ground.
post #25 of 27
I like using a piece of 1x3 pine. Put your boot on it, trace the foot print and cut it out with a jig saw, repeat and make two. Sand smooth and bevel the edges. Now you have blanks to clip into the bindings to hold the brakes up and even better, clamp into a vise for more secure tuning.

EDIT: I see Uncle Louie does the same thing. I made them for my boots and my wife's. Makes tuning a breeze.
post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
I should have said carpet instead of ground.
Gotcha!
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
This all sounds too complicated.
It's really not but when you explain it in detail I guess it seems that way.

It is a 2 second thing that I don't give a second thought to.
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