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Transition help wanted....

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quick question: when I am on the groomers and want to make an edge change (GS radius turn) I first need to release out of the old turn. So, I relax the downhill leg and let my CM come over my skis. At this point, do I continue relaxing the old outside leg and tip it into the new turn with weight on it (sort of a White Pass turn)? Or, do I project my CM down the fall line by extending my old inside leg and getting to the front of the boot (jumping through a window, as somebody once told me)? Is that considered excessive movement nowadays?

Also, where in this sequence (and how) can I work on drawing my old outside foot back under my hips? I have a bad habit of letting it get out in front of me and causing excessive countering.
post #2 of 13
For me, the extension of the new outside leg and the relaxation of the old outside leg are ongoing from the end of the old turn and simultaneous. The relaxation includes flexing the ankle and knee and aiming the knee where I want my CM to go. The ankle/knee flexing is another way of thinking about holding the new inside foot back. I think of the holding back as sort of a negative tensing and the flexing toward the turn as more positive. The extension is primarily to maintain contact with the snow at first and then to stand against the forces developed as the turn continues. A "launching" action with the new outside leg often results in too much CM movement toward the center of the turn and not enough along, but inside, the path the skis will take.
post #3 of 13
You can also let the skis continue to turn underneath you as you start to relax. That will put the CM on the inside. As the CM moves to the inside of the turn you can retract that new inside foot, keep pressure against the boot tongue on the new outside ski and you will be just about where you want to be.
post #4 of 13
You may wish to try a combination of both the moves you describe, but assuming you are making truely completed GS turns 180 degrees from transition perpendicular to to falline to the next transition perpendicular to falline in the opposite direction then your CM should not be projected into the falline, but rather forward and laterally. Try a continuous movement of your CM from the finish of one turn into the initiation of the next.

Most people have excessive ski lead (including myself) it is just something to be mindful of...and work on... when i catch myself aware of it I simply pull the lead foot back that automagically creates the ankle flex.

Good Luck!
post #5 of 13
Although there is a benefit to standing on the new outside leg above the fall line, there is also wisdom in letting pressure build up on the outside ski as a result of turning. You should have both approaches in your tool box.
post #6 of 13
Great posts above!!
Moving the CM progressivly through the turn is not done (effectivly) by thrusting, or meerly extending a leg. Moving the core with the new inside foot keeps you in balance. The core or Cm must also move down during the transition and into the new turn, as you flex the new inside ankle and leg. Most skiers keep the core level and the result is the skis don't engage in the snow until the fall line when the core does start to move down the hill.

RW
post #7 of 13
Weems encouraged me to "be more active at transition." By this, he encouraged me to take the "leap of faith" by letting my body lead into the turn. I don't do it with any strong movements, however, but more by the angles I apply...they just project my torso towards the center of the upcoming turn.

I think primarily of that and of tipping my old outside/new inside ski onto the little-toe edge as I progressively change edges into the new turn.

There is also often a sense of active retraction in my turns, now. That has really smoothed out the transition for me.
post #8 of 13

transitions

dawgcatching:

An analogy that I"ve found helpful is to think that during the transition your uphill and downhill feet have to trade places (and therefore functions).
As you relax the old outside leg, you are allowing it to "give up" it's job of carrying most of your weight. Therefore you must start to allow the old inside leg to take on this responsibility; that is, allow weight to start to transfer. Another job that must be transfered is that of being the lead ski. This means that the old outside ski actually starts to move forward , while the old inside ski starts to draw back. (trading places) Also you are tipping both skis over to change to the other set of edges. All of this stuff happens more or less simultaneuosly, and when done well, more slowly than many skiers imagine. So the goal is to blend all these movements into a relatively smooth, progressive transition. Do it all at once, but not suddenly.

cdnguy
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
There is also often a sense of active retraction in my turns, now. That has really smoothed out the transition for me.
SSH,

I would encourage you to think of your "sense of active retraction" as a form of pressure management... If I understand what you mean then you are effectively managing the pressure that is building up with your sense of active retraction. It's a pressure control movement in the PSIA dogma.

But very cool you have gained this awareness, many many skiers do not seem to realize, myself included, upto a few years ago.
Cheers!
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all of the tips. I feel that I am getting better release early into the turn, by doing the following in combination: active retraction of the old outside leg, relaxing that leg (allowing it to begin to flex), and turning that old outside knee into the turn, which allows my body to flow down the hill. Sound about right?

Also, when I am coming out of the transition (belly of the turn, CM about to come over my old outside ski) should I focus on moving my belt buckle over my skis once again? Or, does this happen with a clean release down the hill? I sometimes feel as if I am slightly in the back seat coming out of the turn, and have trouble "catching up" to the skis in the transition.

Also, when I am entering a left turn primariliy on my inside ski (Von Grunigen/White Pass turn) my new inside ski/uphill edge sometimes hooks up and begins very aggressively carving, throwing me off balance (it feels either like I am smoothly skidding or, with slightly more angulation, on a runaway carving ski, with nothing in between, this foot only). Does this indicate an alignment problem? I feel slighly knock-kneed on this ski only, depsite my 8 strips of duct tape trying to flatten my left ski out. The ski also tends to track toward the right ski. Any ideas?
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching
Also, where in this sequence (and how) can I work on drawing my old outside foot back under my hips? I have a bad habit of letting it get out in front of me and causing excessive countering.

Does the foot cause the excessive counter? or is the foot caused by the excessive counter?
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching
Also, when I am entering a left turn primariliy on my inside ski (Von Grunigen/White Pass turn) my new inside ski/uphill edge sometimes hooks up and begins very aggressively carving, throwing me off balance (it feels either like I am smoothly skidding or, with slightly more angulation, on a runaway carving ski, with nothing in between, this foot only). Does this indicate an alignment problem? I feel slighly knock-kneed on this ski only, depsite my 8 strips of duct tape trying to flatten my left ski out. The ski also tends to track toward the right ski. Any ideas?

: If I start a turn on my old inside (new outside) ski then I want it to hook up & carve early... that is why I started the turn that way....
If I am asked to start a turn on my old outside (new inside ski) then I want it to hook up.... I would not heavily weight ski that I did not want to hook up.... Did you mean to say it differently? Do I read it incorrectly?? You weight a ski (I am confused if it is new or old inside) and it hooks up & carves & this is a problem?

Or is it the rate at which edge engagement occurs that is the problem (third read through)???
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching
Quick question: when I am on the groomers and want to make an edge change (GS radius turn) I first need to release out of the old turn. So, I relax the downhill leg and let my CM come over my skis. At this point, do I continue relaxing the old outside leg and tip it into the new turn with weight on it (sort of a White Pass turn)? Or, do I project my CM down the fall line by extending my old inside leg and getting to the front of the boot (jumping through a window, as somebody once told me)? Is that considered excessive movement nowadays?

Also, where in this sequence (and how) can I work on drawing my old outside foot back under my hips? I have a bad habit of letting it get out in front of me and causing excessive countering.
dawgcatching: As far as the inside ski lead try to think not about pulling back the inside ski but bring/sliding the outside hip forward to catch up with the inside tip lead that you are describing. As an example on the finish of say a left turn if the left ski is getting ahead too much try to move the right hip area forward to get closer to both ski tips in line with each other, try to combine that move {hip forward) with the release of the outside edge in this case right ski towards the next turn which is to the right. Good luck! P.S. I like the analogy of another poster of the work of one leg being done and the next leg taking over.
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