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Goggles for the already goggled

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I had my first day on the slopes yesterday and had a great day with my new Metron 9's. What a ski! The only bummer was my new Smith goggles, which spent more time in a state of impenetrable fog than not. Is there a goggle that you good folks can recommend that will fit over a pair of prescription glasses that will do a good job resisting fogging?
post #2 of 25
I did a bunch of research on the same question and concluded that unless you want to go with contacts or Lasik, you will have glasses under your goggles and they will tend to fog up in some circumstances.

The Smith Knowledge Turbo OTG model has gotten positive comments here, but is relatively expensive. These goggles have a small, battery powered fan to ventilate the area inside the goggles.

To see these goggles go to www.rei.com and search for "OTG Goggles". You'll see the Knowledge model listed.

Good luck.
post #3 of 25
Which were fogging up, your goggles or your glasses?

You could try using some anti-fog spray or wipes. I use it on both my goggles and glasses.

Also try to keep your googles on your face. If you put them on your head/ helmet on the chair it takes a while for them to get back to the right temp.
post #4 of 25
Just a data point:

I always wear contacts, but recently I did ski with glasses and goggles. I was okay so long as I was moving (sufficient air flow through the goggle vents, presumably), but when I stopped, my glasses fogged in a matter of seconds. The only way I could manage was by taking my goggles off whenever I stopped, and putting them on just as I started moving ... which isn't the greatest solution. But it suggests those goggles with the fan may be just the ticket.
post #5 of 25
The Smith OTG turbo with battery-operated fan is the way to go if you need to wear glasses under goggles. None of the "anti-fog" products do anything more than smear up your lenses so you're looking through a waterglass when fogging conditions occur (usually while stopped after skiing some).

The Smith design exhausts the goggle space out the top, drawing fresh outside air in through all the foam venting around the bottom and sides. This keeps the glasses from fogging. It's the glasses that fog generally in OTG setups. The fan is efficient enough that batteries can last for weeks of daily skiing.
post #6 of 25
Smith Storm OTG. Can they fog a little when stopped and breathing heavily? Sure. But just pop em up, or simply lift them off your face for 30 seconds and they're good to go. Or spend $150 so you don't have to go through all the trouble of lifting your hands to your face
post #7 of 25

Smith turbo fan

I've had these goggles for the past three years and love them. Yes, they are a little expensive, but worth every penny.

They stay turned off most of the time, but it takes 5 seconds or less to defog at any time.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdough
Smith Storm OTG. Can they fog a little when stopped and breathing heavily? Sure. But just pop em up, or simply lift them off your face for 30 seconds and they're good to go. Or spend $150 so you don't have to go through all the trouble of lifting your hands to your face
I think you may be minimizing what can be a real nuisance. In my case, it's my glasses that fog up, especially when it's very cold. And while lifting up the goggles briefly will let my glasses clear, they will usually fog up again as soon as I'm back underway.

I haven't bought the Turbo goggles, but I'm sure considering it.
post #9 of 25
I have the same thing- it's the glasses that fog up. But once moving, there's enough air flow that nothing fogs up. If they're fogging while you're moving, then yes, the lifting solution probably wouldn't be a good idea! Is there any space between the top of the goggles and your hat/helmet? Glass/plastic lenses? Just throwing out a few ideas...

I was thinking about the fan as well, but after trying the non-electric models, was quite impressed. Good luck in your search!
post #10 of 25
My advice, leave the glasses in the vehicle and go with contacts. Wore glasses since 5 years old and switched to contacts last year.

I will NEVER wear glasses skiing again. so much clearer, no optical distortion, no fogging, no pain, no glasses becoming dislodged under the goggles, no pain in the but goggles on and off, this list could go for a while you get the point.

The 30 seconds it takes to put in contacts is worth every nano-second.

Go buy a pack of 10 disposables, chuck em at the end of the day and keep an extra one or two on hill with you just in case.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdough
I have the same thing- it's the glasses that fog up. But once moving, there's enough air flow that nothing fogs up. If they're fogging while you're moving, then yes, the lifting solution probably wouldn't be a good idea! Is there any space between the top of the goggles and your hat/helmet? Glass/plastic lenses? Just throwing out a few ideas...

I was thinking about the fan as well, but after trying the non-electric models, was quite impressed. Good luck in your search!
To answer the questions, I've got plastic lenses in my glasses, and I'm not helmeted -yet.

The only time that I really have a problem is when it's super cold and I'm wearing a neoprene face shield. I haven't been able to configure it so my breath doesn't get pumped into the goggle chamber somehow. In this case it doesn't matter whether I'm moving or not. And as was reported previously, anti-fog compounds on my glasses haven't helped, and really only make the visibility problem worse.
post #12 of 25
I've just ordered from PSIA some Bolle over the glasses goggles, which are also "phototropic" which I think is some kind of photochromatic. A colleague today had the non-over the glasses ones and said the photochromaticness worked great, so I have high hopes.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdough
Smith Storm OTG. Can they fog a little when stopped and breathing heavily? Sure. But just pop em up, or simply lift them off your face for 30 seconds and they're good to go. Or spend $150 so you don't have to go through all the trouble of lifting your hands to your face

The problem isn't the goggle fogging, it's the glasses that fog. The turbo fan sucks air past the glasses lenses, helping them stay clear. When your glasses fog, you can't see anything clearly. When you wait with goggles lifted off your face for the glasses to clear and then replace the goggles, your glasses fog immediately. BTDT for many, many years.
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
I've just ordered from PSIA some Bolle over the glasses goggles, which are also "phototropic" which I think is some kind of photochromatic. A colleague today had the non-over the glasses ones and said the photochromaticness worked great, so I have high hopes.

That means the goggle lens darkens in brighter light. Won't help a bit with fogging glasses.
post #15 of 25
Go into an optometrist, tell them you've never worn contacts and want to test them out. They will charge for the exam (35-50) but They should be willing to give you a couple of samples of disposables to try out. If you can't stand them, you're not out that much, and you now have a prescription for your new glasses. If you love them like 90% of skiers who switch, you will wonder why you didn't get them earlier.

I still wear glasses daily, but when I ski or play sports it's always contacts now. Aside from the safety, no chance of fogging, and better depth perception the one downside is that you probably need a $6 bottle of rewetting drops to carry around to keep your eyes from getting dry every hour or so depending on the type of lens and conditions.

If you're stuck with glasses I have a few tips.
1) Yes, a goggle with an internal fan is the best and most expensive solution.
2) Some antifog treatments do help, but if you have a lens with an antireflective coating they will make the glass look smudged.
3) What you want is to keep the ratio of goggle to lens high. Large OTG goggle and small lens work best.
4) rimless glasses fog less becasue you don't have the metal frame acting as a conductor.
5) if you wear a full mask it will inevitably channel your hot breath up into your lenses and fog your glasses.
6) If you're alone at the top of cannon mt. at -10 degrees F in whiteout conditions, you just lost one ski in a snowdrift and now you can't see b/c your glases just fogged up from looking at the ground - you're screwed.
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick
Go into an optometrist, tell them you've never worn contacts and want to test them out. They will charge for the exam (35-50) but They should be willing to give you a couple of samples of disposables to try out. If you can't stand them, you're not out that much, and you now have a prescription for your new glasses. If you love them like 90% of skiers who switch, you will wonder why you didn't get them earlier.

I still wear glasses daily, but when I ski or play sports it's always contacts now. Aside from the safety, no chance of fogging, and better depth perception the one downside is that you probably need a $6 bottle of rewetting drops to carry around to keep your eyes from getting dry every hour or so depending on the type of lens and conditions.

If you're stuck with glasses I have a few tips.
1) Yes, a goggle with an internal fan is the best and most expensive solution.
2) Some antifog treatments do help, but if you have a lens with an antireflective coating they will make the glass look smudged.
3) What you want is to keep the ratio of goggle to lens high. Large OTG goggle and small lens work best.
4) rimless glasses fog less becasue you don't have the metal frame acting as a conductor.
5) if you wear a full mask it will inevitably channel your hot breath up into your lenses and fog your glasses.
6) If you're alone at the top of cannon mt. at -10 degrees F in whiteout conditions, you just lost one ski in a snowdrift and now you can't see b/c your glases just fogged up from looking at the ground - you're screwed.
Well said.

I tried soft contacts some (many) years ago and wasn't very satisfied. Maybe it's time for another go.
post #17 of 25
I have the Bolle x500 (phototropic) and x200 (clear) over the glasses goggles. The size of your glasses and whether you wear a helmet matters on the fit and comfort. My experience with them has been pretty good as both are double lensed and resist fogging up. You have a couple of issues- first if the goggle lenses are treated at the manufacturer (like the Bolle are) with an anti-fog then never use the spray or cat gut or similar anti-fogging stuff on the goggles themselves or you risk clouding the lenses or scratching them reducing the clarity permanently. All the anti-fogging solutions I have tried you put it on the lenses and the wipe it off. Second issue is the glasses you wear- are they glass lenses or plastic? Plastic again scratch much easier than true glass lenses (they sell an extra coating as an option to reduce the likelihood of getting them scratched) so always use a solution that is not going to cause them to get scratched and a soft cloth or material to wipe off the anti-fog solution. (I have read that a mixture of alcohol and water or even vodka will work just as good as the sprays they sell but I have not tried any of these). Next issue is the glasses do not fog as much if they adjust to the temperature (leave the goggles off for a few minutes when coming out of the lodge, make sure there is not moisture inside the goggle lenses etc.) will help reduce the fogging of the glasses.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by RShea
Next issue is the glasses do not fog as much if they adjust to the temperature (leave the goggles off for a few minutes when coming out of the lodge, make sure there is not moisture inside the goggle lenses etc.) will help reduce the fogging of the glasses.
This is the opposite of my experience. I feel that glasses fog up when warm moisture-laden air (breath, sweat/vapor from face with heavy exertion, etc.) condenses on cold surface (glasses). If the glasses are warmer than the air hitting them, they do not fog. The Turbo fan works by evacuating the moisture laden air from the goggle chamber and replacing it with cold DRY air. Dry air, so no moisture to condense. But, if you have no fan, then your best bet is to keep the glasses as warm as possible to reduce the chance of condensation. Put them on IN THE LODGE and do not remove them until you are back in the lodge and the internal temp has acclimated to the ambient lodge temp. If you remove too soon in the lodge--instant fog. If you remove them on the lift, your lenses will be clear (and cold). Once you put the goggles back on, you will fog if you start sweating, huffing etc. before the glass has a chance to warm up. If you leave the goggles on while riding chairs etc, you may get a little fog, but if the goggle is well ventilated, this will quickly dissipate as soon as you start moving and the warm moist air is evacuated. Yes, if at some point, you fog badly then you do have to remove the goggles. That is a good time to wipe you glasses with an "anti fog cloth" (while moist--available from Smith etc.), replace goggles and go easy for a few minutes until the temp inside the goggle chamber warms the glass a bit. It is a balance between temperature and humidity. Raising the surface temperature of the glass (leaving goggles on) or reducing humidity (turbo fan evacuating humid air, or avoiding entry of moisture into the goggle chmber) will both decrease the tendency to fog.

Sorry for the long-winded reply.

I hope this helps.
post #19 of 25
My friends who use the Turbo goggles have had very good luck with them. If I had glasses I am sure I would get them also. Granted, they are expensive initially, but if you spread the cost over several seasons it probably will not seem that much. What are fog free goggles/glasses worth? A lot when the snow is great and you can see well enough to enjoy every bit of it!
post #20 of 25
If you have a helmet and want to go for the Smith Turbos, take the helmet with you to make sure that ..

The helmet design will mate with the goggle. My kid had a problem with that.

The helmet strap retainer slots will not conflict with the battery pack. I think he had a problem with a Leedom and a Carrera ...
post #21 of 25
I've just started using the Turbo OTG this season since so many Bears had recommended them highly. However, initially I was disappointed... that is until I discovered that my glasses were still fogging because the tops of the lenses were rubbing against my eyebrows traping warm moist air at that point. So I adjusted my nose pieces to keep the lenses away from my face a bit, and I trim my eyebrows regularly. I also use Catcrap on my glasses and everything works perfectly now - there's no fogging that Turbo can't eliminate in seconds.
post #22 of 25
i wear OTG polarized Carrera's yellow lens.

my secret is put em om over the helmet while getting dressed still inside the lodge AND leave em on . i.e .don't mess with them putting up and down while outside .

This works i tried all the anti fog stuff , cat crap, wipes etc AND this is the ONLY technique that that works for me and its damned cold here in the Adirondacks , Laurentians and NE where i ski a great majority of the time
post #23 of 25
The fan works and nothing else really does. Some folks don't sweat much and don't understand why it's such a big deal for others. If you're in great shape, seldom sweat or breathe hard and ski fast fog isn't a problem. Ski slower, work harder etc. etc and you need the fan. If you figure the cost of skiing and the time you can waste with lousy goggles you will quickly see the fans are a good investment.
post #24 of 25
just H.S. science ......keep your glasses warm before u put ur glasses on and u'll have no condensation problem.........the reason it fog up is that u glasses gets cold when u remove ur goggle and moist warm air get trap in ur goggle once u put them back on and the 1st thing moisture stick to is ur freshly cold glasses.........understand dew point and u'll understand the foggy problem
post #25 of 25
I noticed that Carrera Kimerik OTG do not have double lenses - should this be a concern? I'm looking for a pair of "cool looking" OTG goggles and these are the only ones I've found.
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