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Who uses a multi-boot quiver?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I have been skiing on an old pair of Raichle Flexon boots for the last decade and a half. They are super comfortable and are great fun to ski on.

My question is if anyone uses multiple boots in the same manner most people use multiple skis.

I can see the benefit of being able to match your boots to the conditions in the same manner you choise which ski to use based on conditions. Maybe you would use softer boots for powder days and stiffer boots for when you just want to get out and cruise the hard pack.

I see the downside as having different boot length meaning you can only use certain boards or go through the hastle of adjusting bindings (unless of course the boot soles match).

I have only ever had one pair of "active" boots.

Any comments on this?
post #2 of 24
some folks have AT boots and alpine boots. I am about to get new boots (Ugghh) and expect to keep my old, packed out, finally comfortable boots for teaching those lessons that require almost as much standing and walking or skating as real skiing. No point in wearing out the new boots if the ole slippers will do! Hopefully, the lengths will be the same. If not, well, I don't know then...
post #3 of 24
Used to when I was an instructor: no point in giving lessons to beginners in race boots
post #4 of 24
I'll admit it - I have multiple pairs of boots (no surprise there) and I do use them for specific purposes.

I have a pair of Raichile Flexon T boots that are setup soft and easy so that I can use them when I'm skiing slow with my kids (comfort over function in these).

I have a pair of Raichle Flexon Comp boots that are setup stiffer including Booster straps and a custom footbed for aggressive skiing.

I'm trying to move into my Dalbello Kryptons, but I'm still working on getting them dialed in. Even when I do, I don't see me decommissioning the other Flexons (unless I'm flat out "floored" by their performance).

And I'm considering picking up a Dolomite Z Race plug for recreational racing duties. I've found that the Dolomite last fits my foot rather well and I hopefully won't need a ton of work to get into these boots.
post #5 of 24
I currently have 3 pair of active boots....2 pair of TNT explosion 8's, one for the local hill has about 250 days the other for travel near mint(less than 25 days).....and a pair of TNT racing....the blue buckle version....

lime green buckle TNT's retired sold on ebay....sold TNT AVS racing(the tangerine buckets) on ebay last year....

I used to have the benefit of pro form....so I stocked up....

All have same sole length 304mm and I baby the bottoms....no worries swopping out....

I am very blessed. My foot fits Tecnica 26.5 304mm like they were custom made for me....I read the painful posts about ill fitting boots with an understanding of how lucky I am....

I also rotate my custom orthonics from 1 boot to another....
post #6 of 24
I've been thinking about the boot quiver myself. Currently I have:

1) Scarpa Lasers - 130 Days on them, fit great, no blister problems. These have done things like the Haute Route and Berner Oberland, hard to let them go.

But I got...

2) New Scarpa Lasers w/ Denali Tongues and Booster Straps - Grabbed a brand new pair of Lasers cheap over the summer and did some customizing. I skied these for the first time yesterday and they will most likely replace the other pair except perhaps on longer, multi-day tours. The stiffer tongue and Booster straps definitly improve the ski performance.

3) Technica Icon Alu - Bought later in the season last year and still working on getting these dialed in (need to call the bootfitter, thanks of the reminder). These are my stiff Alpine boots, I love the performance, but I can't really see myself doing much hiking in these.

Since a lot of my "resort" days still involve doing some hiking....

4) I'm in the market right now for a less stiff Alpine boot with a ski/walk mode. Might put a vibram sole on them too.

So, I think my "quiver" will really end up being three boots: AT, Performance Alpine, Comfort Alpine.
post #7 of 24
I have two pair of boots that I've skied in this year. I bought new boots last year that worked great for me (Rachle F-ONE Rev with Thermoflex liners), but sometimes in the moguls they sort of collapse forward, and so, being influenced by the Flexon fervor, I jumped at a deal on Flexon Comps, which included the extra, stiff tongues.

I skied the Flexons (which have the stock liners) at Moonlight last week, and though they were great performance-wise, I developed soreness around the the calf, even though they weren't very tight. I skied my F-ONEs the next day and had no issues with this soreness, so I figure I'll get some thermoflex for the Flexons, as a continuation of the experiment.

The two pair of boots have different sole lengths, so I may eventually set certain skis up for certain boots, but not yet.
post #8 of 24
Atomic Beta race 10.50 for resort skiing

Scarpa Denali with Nordica liners for patrolling/alpine touring/skiing with beginners

Dynafit sloppers for fast and light peak bagging/ski down
post #9 of 24
Scarpa Terminators (plastic) or Merrill Super Ultras (leather) for regular skiing and teleboard skiing, Deluxe Clicker or Burton Shadow hard boots for snowboard skiing.
post #10 of 24
I had three boots: Tecnica Icon XT, Icon ALu COmp and DIablo Race R. I dropped the latter.

IMO there is a good idea to have a boot which performs well when you do not ski aggressively and another for those days when you want to push the pedal to the limits of your ability.

Btw, i currently have a one ski quiver.
post #11 of 24

Planning on it

This Fall I picked up a pair of Lange Banshee 100 and Lange L10 for slightly less than $200 combined shipped. These are both new boots and will replace San Marco Foam fit race boots. My hope is that I will use the softer Banshee's on easier days and when I see myself in the bumps much or not too steep soft stuff. The L10's I hope to use in the steep stuff and when I want to rip. Well that is the plan. Th L10's have not arrived yet and I do not know how much they will need to be messed with to fit well.
Lee
post #12 of 24
Salomon XWave 8
Technica TNT Exposion 8 (still favorites, I use these more than the Xwave)
Garmont Adrenalin AT

I was amazed with the alpine touring boot. These are nearly as stiff as the alpine boots in downhill mode, but have a bit less forward lean.
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by goriders
I have been skiing on an old pair of Raichle Flexon boots for the last decade and a half. They are super comfortable and are great fun to ski on.

My question is if anyone uses multiple boots in the same manner most people use multiple skis.

I can see the benefit of being able to match your boots to the conditions in the same manner you choise which ski to use based on conditions. Maybe you would use softer boots for powder days and stiffer boots for when you just want to get out and cruise the hard pack.

I see the downside as having different boot length meaning you can only use certain boards or go through the hastle of adjusting bindings (unless of course the boot soles match).

I have only ever had one pair of "active" boots.

Any comments on this?
I could never ski in more than one pair of boots. I too skied in Flexons for years, but have upgraded to Kryptons. I still have my Flexons, and if I needed, I could ski them, but I would rather ski the Kryptons.
post #14 of 24
I have the Icon Alu Comp and the Diablo 130. I also hasve some XT17's but they don't get used too much with the other boots in the quiver. I would sell them but the re-sale value is not great.
post #15 of 24
Unless you have extremes in your skiing, like you are a racer or teaching beginners and skiing flat trails all day, no skier should require more than one pair of boots. If I had to choose I would ski in the Dobermann Pro 130 or maybe the Technica Race Pro 130 (although it would need a lot of work). If I were teaching however I may want to add a softer, wider boot to that boot, just because it is uncomfortable to ski in those boots for 8 hours, and keeping them unbuckled for the majority of the day just looks silly (yes I'm one of those guys who unbuckles for the lift ride - sorry I'm a racer).

As it stands now, I ski in the Dobie WC 150 for the majority of my days (when carving and training or racing). The rest of the time, when there is soft snow, I am skiing with friends (not racers), or plan to venure into really rough terrain or the park I use my Head S12's. They do the trick for jut about everything - but when I ski groomers aggressively with them I always feel like I'm going to break them. Usually I have to tighten the rear screws after a day of groomers with them... Plus the middle two buckles hit to gether when I flex them, so I tend to try to keep the serious race carving to a minimum on them.

Later

GREG
post #16 of 24
The pain, suffering and debilitation I've gone through to render one pair of boots wearable is enough for any fool. Why do it twice?

A potential exception: AT gear. I'd like to outfit for that. I've been told good AT boots make a difference, and that the fitting process is less intense. True?
post #17 of 24

An unconventional quiver for my unconventional feet.  Details to follow.

 

 

post #18 of 24

I have 2 pair.  Lange Freeride 110s which fit great out of the box.  Same story with my Salmon Ghosts.  I certainly don't "need" two pair of boots but got them booth very cheap and they both fit great and it gives me some options to play with BSL is within 2mm difference so won't require a ton of binding work. 

post #19 of 24

Lang Comp 100  - every day alpine; Garmont Adrenaline - AT. Now adding something dynafit compatible (light weight touring rig). Its horses for courses.

post #20 of 24

Sollie Falcon 10's for everyday back east, Sollie X2 Labs for racing, Sollie Guns for out west and eastern AT, and a new pair of BD Factors that should retire the Guns when I get them dialed in.  

post #21 of 24

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by avalement View Post

 

An unconventional quiver for my unconventional feet.  Details to follow.

 

 

That IS an eclectic group of boots, please DO expand. 

post #22 of 24

My life with ski boots.

 

First rental experience was with leather boots and cable bindings.  Magazines had ads for the new buckle boots from Henke.  Early 70s, some lessons, more rentals.  Got my own gear just in time for the coming-of-age trip to Vail.  Rossi Colorado 76 skis, Humanic soft plastic boots and Jet Stix.  I coveted Lange boots, but having the Soft Inside poster on my dorm wall was sufficient.  80s - career, sports cars, career change, met my wife, started a family, little or no skiing.  90s - Every time I think about getting back into skiing my buddies complain about how expensive the gear is, or how expensive it is to take the family skiing.  I actually try on some boots in shops.  If any of them had felt comfortable, maybe I would have spent the $250 to $300.  Nothing fit or felt right.

 

Late 90s, got some Nordicas at a garage sale for $10, they felt better than any boot I had tried.  A little later, got some $15 Salomons which also felt pretty good.  I figured out that my wide, flat, and fallen-arch feet had never agreed with conventional overlap boots.  My bargain boots were both rear-entry.  00s, my sons become interested in skiing.  Online auctions and listings make it easy for me to find equipment for them.  I find the SX92 (gray), the Salomon EXP80 (gray, red buckles), and the Raichle Flexon Racer (yellow).  With shipping I paid $100 for these three pairs.  Two rear-entries and a 3-piece.  I tinker and fiddle with lifts, wedges, insoles and pads.  The SX92 gets a full insole, the EXP80 gets heel lifts, and the Raichle gets a wedge under the liner.  They all pass the full day on the hill test.  But the EXP80 gives me a couple of mild foot cramps riding the chair, and the Raichle is a bit snug at the ankle bone (I really like Raichle's eccentric disc method of setting cuff alignment for my mal-pronated feet, but that mechanism takes up some lateral space in the shell).  I continue to look for vintage boots I can experiment with.

 

Recently found the blue Lange CRLs (10, 28, 345) for $12 (twelve) on the clearance table at Sports Authority.  They felt great at the store, so I finally had my chance to be a Lange guy.  After three runs, my feet hurt, gritting-my-teeth hurt.  The front entry gods still frown on me.  All is not lost, my son skied a full day in them and he loves them, and I've added many more posters to the Lange collection I started back in the day.

 

 

Back to rear entry . . .

 

Found another pair of SX92s, the white Equipes.  Soles are a bit worn, but with the added insole they ski very well, like the gray ones.  Just got the dark green Raichle FX7s for $19 including shipping.  Again, the very comfortable Flexon tongue makes it easy to get my foot in and easy to pull / insert the liner when I tinker with the pads.  I need to take a couple of days in the off-season to get the same degree of cuff alignment on the SX92s and the Raichles.  The yellow Racer has degrees of cuff cant, from +4 to -2, marked on the eccentric disc.

 

Summary:  I don't have any French or Austrian Olympic foot markers in my DNA, so I get to go dumpster diving to find those discredited, depreciated, and discarded non-overlap boots which, thank you very much, fit me very well and help me ski much better.

 

 

 

 

post #23 of 24

The sole lenghts in the family boot quiver go from 310 to 345.  With online shopping and end-of-season sales, our ski quiver has several sets of rental adjustable bindings.  We mix and match all the time.  My boys stay with one boot and change skis with snow conditions.  I have a fast boot, a cruising boot, a very soft boot for when I carry video or camera gear, and a light boot for long, slow half-days teaching my sons.

post #24 of 24

I use a 110 stiffness boot the bulk of the time, but when it gets really warm out at the ends of the season I use a 130 stiffness boot to compensate for the warm outside temperature.

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