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Too mch ski for me: Volkl 6 Star?

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
I'm 180 lb 51 year old who skis aobut 5-8 days per year. Blues are easy enough, blacks are sometimes fun sometimes scarry. Don't do so well on the bumps.

I've been pointed to Volkl 6 stars.

Any thoughts?
post #2 of 51
you shouldn't seek to maximise ski performance (that would point towards the 6*) but seek to maximise fun. your ski should be easy enough to use, and stay so when the slopes have worn out etc.

example: while i CAN handle some of the most dedicated expert ski in some way, i have much mor fun on my rather forgiving axis x, all in all. they are not as good on hardpack as a slalom ski, not as floaty as a fat twin tip off piste, and not as stable as soem skicross boards, but much of the time they are fun to ski and give an and confident ride. not that i want to talk you into k2 at all. any manufacturer makes some nice advanced level skis that deliver great performance without being too demanding. examples could be: volkl 5star, fischer rx6, k2 apache x, head monster im72, head ic280, atomic izor 9.7 and many many others.

tell us where and what snow conditions you usually ski.
post #3 of 51
Go for it! Three years ago when I started skiing I bought high performance gear and haven't looked back! Make sure you are in good shape and have balance, though. A demanding ski works your butt off, which makes rehab at the bar more pleasurable.....
post #4 of 51

Imho

The six star is too much for you. Skiing is supposed to be fun. I know many fine skiers who dumped that ski because it was too much ski.

For comparison, drop down to a 5* as a demo. You should see a big difference. If that is the case look around at other skis and find a performance ski that is not so stiff. There are plenty out there.

Life is too short to spend time fighting with your skis.
post #5 of 51
I'm 49 and continue to use high performance gear. It has motivated me to be in shape, I circuit train and rollerblade.

The 6* will tire a skier faster than a 4*, Fischer RX-6, or other good intermediate skis. If you want an all-day high performance ski and are not planning on skiing at racing speeds, the 4* or RX-6 might be a better choice. The 6* shines at higher speeds, at moderate speeds the there are better skis.

If you enjoy the thrill of a top performing ski, use the 6*, it will help keep you young.

Cheers,

Barrettscv
post #6 of 51

Friends

I ski with a group of people who are expert skiers without a doubt. When I ski with them it's usually on groomed, steep and fast terrain. All of them have dumped the 6* and moved to other high performance skis.

That doesn't mean that other expert skiers won't enjoy the 6*, but it is an indication of something. One of the guys is 64 years old. He is right on his skis - he went to the Superspeed.

The six star is not a ski that a shop should put someone on who skis 10 times per year. It is an expert ski that requires solid technique.

Try something else.
post #7 of 51
I would certainly say that a 6 star is too much ski for you if you mainly ski blues and the occasional black.

The 5 star is a FANTASTIC ski that will allow you to really ski it hard when you want but won't punish you for taking a run or two off or for getting a bit off balance.

Also, it will save you a few bucks. All but the best skiers in the world would get all they need out of a 5 star.
post #8 of 51
If I only skiied 5-8 days per year I doubt I would even own skis. If you rent/demo you will have an unlimited quiver to choose from. You could pick skis according to snow conditions or whatever you feel like trying out. You will always be on the latest gear. If you don't like them after a couple runs you can go back and swap them.

Definately rent your skis!

Use that money to buy some good boots.
post #9 of 51
I do not have enough information from you to make a suggestion, in fact the above post by Matt has merit.

I do know the 6 star is not your steed.....I actually would question the integrity of a Volkl rep who would suggest that it is. I know a few Volkl reps....none I know would suggest that ski for you.

Unless you have understated your situation the 6 star will not make you smile. The 4 star comes to mind as perhaps more suitable but need more information about where you ski etc...

Welcome. This forum is a gold mine....if you browse carefully I think you can find your answer to your question in here somewhere or provide more infomation about what you want out of a ski in this thread and many friendly bears will jump in....
post #10 of 51
Just reinforcing some of the wise words above, the 5* or a Head 1400 is my vote. You can't go wrong with the 5*. It's a great ski that will provide plenty of skiing ability range for you. An advanced skier can still enjoy them on the frontside groomers. Make sure you pair them with a good, properly fit boot!!!!!!
post #11 of 51

Idea for MiltonSC

Hey Milton,

Welcome to EpicSki. I'm new here myself. The Bears are great, as you see, put something out there and you get well thought out responses.

I'm about your age and weight, I'm 54 5'10" and 180. I just took this up two years ago and skied about 50 days last year.

I would venture away from the six star. I have a friend here who skis that model. It is VERY QUICK. I was thinking about that model or the RX8 and a good friend said that if I chose either of them that he would like to take out a life insurance policy on me with him as beneficiary. I ended up on a Fischer RX9. But, from your perspective of only getting out 5-8 days a year I would look very seriously at the RX6. The rental idea also is an excellent one. Try out a lot of skis and you will find one that puts a smile on your face.

Here are my thoughts. Skiing should be fun. You don't want a ski that you have to be on top of at all times and that is unforgiving. Be careful. I've broken two bones at this and at our age it is NO FUN. Do you know the difference between a physical therapist and a terrorist? You can negotiate with a terrorist. : Now I understand.

Also, as mentioned above, invest in a good pair of boots. This is much more important than the ski. Can't emphasize that enough. Most of all have fun out there, take lessons and be careful.

Let us know how things work out.
post #12 of 51
Thread Starter 

Here's the requested information. Thanks to all interested parties.

Please help me find my skis. This feels strangely little like a job resume.

Me: Male, 51 years, 5'11", 184 pounds, slightly overweight, in shape.

Experience: Skis about 7 days a year for past 14 years.

Ability: I’m always on groomers. Blues (90%) are easy and fun, blacks (10%) are challenging. I usually maintain control on blacks. I generally ski blues as fast as I can with frequent small turns. More cautions on blacks. I sometimes take a lesson on day 1.
Ski level: 6-7 (methinks?)

Inability: Never have been good in powder. I can't do bumps (although I try every year).

Where: Always western US. Deer Valley, Arizona Ski Resorts, occasionally: Colorado, Tahoe in 2 weeks.

Boots: I own a set of Salomon Evolution Performance 9.0.

Previous skis: Past two years: Bandit B1s, 170. I had a good time on the mountain.

Confession: (gulp) I’m not too sure that I can tell the difference between different skis that I demo. (i.e., I can’t tell the difference in the “flex” setting of my boots.)


Question 1: Which skis do I buy?

Bonus questions:
Question 2: Wimp factor. Should I admit to aging? Should I forget about bumps and blacks to save ligaments and bones? Every year I say to myself, “I got to be more careful and I’m not going to do blacks or try bumps.” Every year I do some blacks and do miserably on a couple of bump runs.

Question 3: With respect to the wimp factor (my age and my preference for intact ACLs over bumps/blacks), any suggestions regarding binding settings?

Question 4: Demo or buy? I think that if I own a set of skis, I’d ski more frequently as Phoenix is 2-3 hours away from snow.

Question 5: Do ski shops away from the snow (i.e., I live in Phoenix) give as solid advice as I can get at Park City or Tahoe?


Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

Milton

Go Bears!
PS: Sorry about my first post, I should have read the suggestions.
PPS: This site is AWESOME. I feel that the responses are candid and real life. Not sales driven.
post #13 of 51
1: Demo Rossignol B2 and Volkl 5*. The B2 is pretty soft, but wide enough for the soft snow/groomed slopes of the west. The 5* carves better, but is still forgiving. It is 10mm narrower undrfoot.
2: That's rediculous.
3: You are probably level II = 7.5.
4: Demo, then buy.
5: No. (Really, depends upon the shop). If you don't know them, don't trust them.
post #14 of 51

5*

5* down to a 4* from what I hear. The five star is still a ski for an expert skier. You want something to learn on, to grow your skiing ability, and something that you don't have to fight with.
post #15 of 51
OK

Much better...

Now I can throw out a short list...

-Nordica Top Fuel modified 178 or 170
-Volkl ac2, ac3 177
-Volkl 7 24 exp (as leftover) 177
-Elan M666 176


When I think AZ I think Flagstaff for skiing, assume you ski apache...my son spent a college summer there at NAU...he mentioned there were a few ski shops in the area...but I have no detail. We have some bears in Flagstaff who could chime in with suggestions.....

I think the relationship you establish with a good shop will be key in your quest, especially at this point in your development.....a good Trusted shop. My short list is really just some random suggestions. Many of these ski's were on my short list before I decided on the allstar as more appropriate for the hardpack I experience here in the east. These are some ski's I would consider were I in your situation. Of course Canyons suggestion of simply upgrading to the B2 makes a lot of sense.

IMO stay away from Volkl supersport series for the west unless you really plan to stay exclusively on groomers.....as you ski more and ability grows I doubt you will.....

Fischer rx6, rx8 and Volkl 4 and 5 star come to mind if that truly is your intent....

Heads, Atomics other Elan's I don't know much about...others will chime in with more ..

As always, let us know what you decide and post a review after you ride em.....
post #16 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrstrat57
OK

Much better...

Now I can throw out a short list...

-Nordica Top Fuel modified 178 or 170
-Volkl ac2, ac3 177
-Volkl 7 24 exp (as leftover) 177
-Elan M666 176
-Rossignol B2
That means my Atomic R10.20's in 170 would be perfect for you! Wow!
post #17 of 51

Telluride

A ski group from Phoenix is coming to Telluride this weekend. Timing is close, but it would be easy for me to find out who the group is if you're interested.

You've got about 100 days skiing in. Hmmmm, take a look at the Fischer RX-9. It's fabulous on groomers (17m radius). A caveat, I'm not that experienced and have only been out on the ski for six days this year, but love it, I'm a groomer zoomer too.

If you haven't been here it's only about 9 hours from Phoenix, I transfered from there. Lots of good stuff for guys like you and me.

KenE
post #18 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mainiac
That means my Atomic R10.20's in 170 would be perfect for you! Wow!


That's a pretty sweet deal you have on those actually....surprised no one has snapped em up yet....

He actually might like those, don't you think....? The price is sure right.
post #19 of 51
Thanks, hrstrat57, FYI on this ability level discussion and what kind if skis to buy, the R10.20's were my "beginner" skis. They are a tad short for me at 5 11 220lbs: I grew into them. I actually learned to turn with them immediately; I never made a christie wedge. Harb's book (lift inside foot) helped me unlock making a tight arc.

I'll bet he would enjoy them! And such a deal!

A ski I have to really "mind" is my RPM 21 in 177, it is stiffer and faster than my 2004-5 176 B2, which I would call "comfy."

Mainiac
post #20 of 51

Try slalom skis

Milton,

Without a question go for demo - eveyone has different preferences and you demo is the only way to get your best ski.
Try real slalom skis - I think you'll love them. See the recent review of SL:11 on this site - the best slalom skis in my mind. Try them, you may like them more then you may expect.

Anton
post #21 of 51
At your age, ability and based on the amount of times you ski per year I would not recommend you buy the 6 star. I am a former racer, 25 years old 6'1" 195 and lift and run regularly to keep in shape and I still think the 6 star is a beefy ski. It isn't as demanding as skiing on my race skis, but closer than you might think. If you think blacks are scarry at all, i just can't see how this ski would work for you. Granted I know very little about your skiing ability, but based on what you said I would look elsewhere. The 6 star is a stiff ski that demands good tecnique and performs best at higher speeds where it can be more easily bent IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by miltonsc
I'm 180 lb 51 year old who skis aobut 5-8 days per year. Blues are easy enough, blacks are sometimes fun sometimes scarry. Don't do so well on the bumps.

I've been pointed to Volkl 6 stars.

Any thoughts?
post #22 of 51

acl vs fun

im 6 years older than you, and i strongly recommend strengthening your knees. it only takes a few minutes a day, and it is much less painful if you do it before you get injured. i do lunges, step-ups to a 20"chair, warrior, chair, and there are others. these can even be done at work.
post #23 of 51
Too much ski is something I hear and read a lot. I hear the volkl 6* is too much ski, you have to be 185+ to bend it and that the superspeed is even more ski and that it doesn't do short turns. Then I take a lift with a 125# female recreational skier who loves her 168cm volkl supperspeeds or when I took another chair with a 70+ yr old 140# guy who skis the 6* and loves to do 360's with em. Either you can ski or ya can't. Demo. Too much misleading info out there.
post #24 of 51
Hey Miltonsc, welcome to epicski.

This is easy. Buy the Volkl 5 stars in 168cm length and don't even second guess your decission. You will have this ski for a very long time.

You will not like the 6 star or this years Allstar. Even level 8 skiers will tell you that the 6 star is more work to ski. The 5 star is just an awesome ski. I skied the origninal T50 - 5 star for 3 years. I am now on last years 5 stars and they are even better then the origninal 5 Stars.

As from my other posts I also enjoy skiing the Volkl Unlimited AC4. The Volkl 5 star is your best choice for the groomers.
post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski=free
Too much ski is something I hear and read a lot. I hear the volkl 6* is too much ski, you have to be 185+ to bend it and that the superspeed is even more ski and that it doesn't do short turns. Then I take a lift with a 125# female recreational skier who loves her 168cm volkl supperspeeds or when I took another chair with a 70+ yr old 140# guy who skis the 6* and loves to do 360's with em. Either you can ski or ya can't. Demo. Too much misleading info out there.
You say there is a lot of misleading info you there, but your's comes from conversations on the lift?? How is that reliable? Have you seen these people actually ski or just heard them talk?? Just because an old man likes to do 360's on this 6* doesn't mean he can bend them or they are the right ski for him. You are the one providing misleading info. Sure you might be right about not having to be 185+ to bend them, and technique matters too, but recommendations based on what you see or talk about in the lift line are bunk.
post #26 of 51
Why are you guys recommending carving skis to someone that skis so little? Some of these recomendations are for really high performance skis -- RX-9 is the top of the line HP carver from fischer. Ditto Volkl 6 star.

Milton,

I suggest you demo the Dynastar Legend 4800. These can be had for cheap these days.

But first check out the online reviews in ski press magazine. Especially the all terrain sport category. Remember, just because you can make it down the hill does not mean it is a suitable ski.

I suggest that the most suitable ski is one on which you can relax the most, and don't have to pay as much attention to while you are getting down the hill. Since you're more relaxed, you'll be able to make better moves and have more fun -- as opposed to being stiff and unable to move for fear of the ski doing something weird.

Hope this helps.
post #27 of 51
Kestner, I didn't provide any misleading info. What I wrote is fact not opinion. Get it straight.
post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
Milton,
I suggest you demo the Dynastar Legend 4800. These can be had for cheap these days. .
I agree with BigE. I demoed the Dynastar Legend 4800 two years ago and thought that it also carved well on the groomers and had better stability in CRUD then the 5 star with the Legned 4800 wider 72mm waist. The5 star waist is 68mm. Although I think you will have more fun on the 5 stars. If you want a resonable priced ski, I like the Dynastar Legend 4800. Is the extra cost of the 5 star worth it given you only ski a few days a year. Ahh maybe yes and maybe no.
post #29 of 51

Your info is fine

And I agree with BigE. Many of the skis that have been suggested here are way to high a level ski. The 4800 is a great ski. The 4* or 5* are both great skis. Metrons are not what I would recommend unless you really love carving and groomers or unless you are a better skier that you have indicated. I like a wide - shaped ski, but that's my position.

Get something fun, that turns and can give some feedback plus a little speed.
post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski=free
Kestner, I didn't provide any misleading info. What I wrote is fact not opinion. Get it straight.
Sorry, but you suggest that because people you saw in the lift line were using certain skis that they could handle them. People say a lot of things and think that they are suited to use equipment they are not suited to use for a variety of reasons. It is absolutely useless to regurgitate what someone tells you, especially when you have no knowledge of their skiing ability and whether or not what they say is true in reference to that ability. Is it fact that some old guys said he likes doing 360's on his volkl 6*? Yes. Is that helpful when the question relates to someone's relative ability or inability to properly ski a certain pair of boards?? NO! I have seen plenty of people in the lift line of various sizes, ages and sex with Superspeeds and Supersports. Does that mean it is the right ski for them, even if they think it is??? NO! It is completely useless and misleading information you provide, while at the same time suggested that others are being misleading. Have you skied the 6* extensively? Why not provide your review based on actual experience if you have? Get that straight.
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