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Arm position visuals.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Somewhat inspired by Marmot MB's thread,

I noticed that I hold a real serving tray lower and look higher when actually offering to someone than when moving through a crowd.
post #2 of 17

hands

IMHO, Where the hands are is a function of their affect on the center of mass going downhill. All upper body parts should help affect dynamic balance. People are different so are hand positions but they should always lead the CM where you want to go. ( If the arm/hand goes back then so goes the balance).
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Leading is rather a dynamic action, and I thought I'd modify the visual from a static tray to the action of extending a tray down for someone to grab a champagne flute off it.
post #4 of 17
Comprex

when I started skiing with my regular instructor he had me stand in the locker room in bare feet & do squats....
then I did it in ski boots.... & tried tipping myself as far forward & backward as I could go without falling....

Some how from watching me do this he got a picture in his head of where my hands needed to be (& my feet/legs... ankle angles etc) for me to be balanced.... He needed to do this because he had to teach me to balance - I could not do it alone.... but it would not hurt for people to be sent to try this out.... you soon realise that your hands reach out when you are trying to lean forward in that boot while in a squat.... or even when you try to squat...

They really do NOT try to reach sideways or swing around or backwards - forwards is it & it is pretty much the place I head to when skiing I now realise
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

disski

Are your ankles fully flexed and no more when the hands start going forward?
post #6 of 17
To be honest - I have no idea.... :

Sorry - my awareness of body position (as such) is a non-entity....

I am only really aware of the consequences... (eg that feeling of skis means I am probably leaning back - check arms legs etc)
post #7 of 17
A question to all in relation to arm position.

Elbows slightly in front of hips and at approx waist height, and try to keep them there.

If ones arms should pretty much stay put, or at least from the elbow up, this says to me that the poling action is mostly a wrist movement and not much more. correct? somewhat of a diagonal movement of knuckles verticle to pole and then rotate them skyward to release poling and get the pole out of the way and stop snow contact.

This being said is it a basic rule that with todays style of skiing, with almost no upweighting or verticle rise in the upper body, are shorter poles required to allow this type of poling action.

IE does the hand under the basket, arm at 90 degrees not apply any more.

My last poles were too long to accomplish any kind of poling without moving the upper arm. I bought 1.5: shorter poles and things seemed easier, but old habits die hard. 10+ years with those old poles.
post #8 of 17


Good arm position. Note that the "strong inside arm," bringing the inside arm forward, creates the counter and causes the skis to be more on edge with no other consideration...just get that arm strong and forward.


Ken
post #9 of 17
is it just net pic twistage or is he dragging /lenaing on his uphill / inside pole?

this is bad isn't it? Unless of course if you don't you'll fall over then its good and bad.

Thanks for the visual though, gave me the concept that driving the inside hand forward will force pressure onto the edge.
post #10 of 17
A simple example: Stand one or even two steps up from the bottom of a staircase.

Now: JUMP and stick the landing with both feet making contact at the same time. Each foot should be directly under hips or narrower, and directly beside each other. Make the landing as QUIET as possible -- that means lots of absorption.

The hands will go where they have to go.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb
is it just net pic twistage or is he dragging /lenaing on his uphill / inside pole?

this is bad isn't it? Unless of course if you don't you'll fall over then its good and bad.
Nah - his inside pole is simply dragging on the snow, and it's enough drag to cause the pole shaft to flex. Happens all the time, actually, if you're pulling big-angle turns.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta
Nah - his inside pole is simply dragging on the snow, and it's enough drag to cause the pole shaft to flex. Happens all the time, actually, if you're pulling big-angle turns.
Agree. He's basically "feeling the snow" with that pole. He's looking ahead (probably at the person with the camera) as he should, and the pole lets him know where the snow is. He should be able to cock his wrist and pull the pole off the snow at any time if he wanted. If he were actually leaning on the pole, he wouldn't have those great angles (he'd be "banked" into the hill more).
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb
If ones arms should pretty much stay put, or at least from the elbow up, this says to me that the poling action is mostly a wrist movement and not much more. correct? somewhat of a diagonal movement of knuckles verticle to pole and then rotate them skyward to release poling and get the pole out of the way and stop snow contact. .
Marmot, my wedeln video is old and I think it will get groans from folks who have seen it a thousand times but it will show you my poling action.

...Ott

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ott Gangl
Marmot, my wedeln video is old and I think it will get groans from folks who have seen it a thousand times but it will show you my poling action.

...Ott

Look at you go ! It seems to me that your poles are shorter than mine. Are your arms 90 degrees with hand under basket?

It seems to me that you lift your hand up to release contact with the snow and your hand comes back slightly and then push the hand back out forward again in ready for the next plant.

I read one explanation that it is more a twisting of the wrist and the pole is held slightly forward to engage and let come back but rotate wrist upward to release contact without the hand comming back towards yourself. keeping the hand completely static in distance from the skier

Perhaps a differance in technique, I'm not even gonna say where I read that for fear of a runaway thread.

Looks good I will give your eg a try tonight. mmm fresh snow at the local hill.
post #15 of 17
Marmot, I am six foot and my poles are 52 inches, that is the length I have used for over sixty seasons. Actually at speed you are going to ski right past your planted/touched poles and if you don't let your hands move back the action of skiing past the pole will take it out of the snow so you can flick it forward.

Too rigid arms will make the rest of your body rigid, just keep your arms forward and loose, before you start, shake them a little bit that will loosen them up. Just go out tonight and ski just exactly like I do here and you will see.

...Ott
post #16 of 17
Ott Gangl: I tried both methods of pole plant tonight. I found your method alot easier, but I see some merrit in the other method it just feels weird.

I also tried keeping the uphill hand forward and definately felt the benefit and pressure it places on the edge. Weird sensation, your mind says turn with the skis and your inside hand comes back. When I concentrated on keeping the inside arm strong to the front lights went on. Thanks to Soft Snow guy on that one.

Busy night with boot tweaks and working on a few things other than poles and hands. Ahhh winter, hill is open
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb
is it just net pic twistage or is he dragging /lenaing on his uphill / inside pole?
He is feeling the snow, and it looks like he is doing it too hard, but he probably just has those silly old man Goode poles.
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