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O/T: Hiking Boots?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Don't kill me for posting this here, but the traffic is so much greater than in the Other Sports forum. I'm looking for new hiking boots for next summer, and wondered if you all had recommendations...I mostly dayhike in Colorado, but would like a pair that are light, comfortable, and sturdy...esp. sturdy! Waterproof would be good too, or at least water resistent.
Thx
post #2 of 16
i wont respond because this is in the wrong thread....jk ....though people will respond if u post there. There r people more qualified to answer ur ???
post #3 of 16
I highly recommend a pair of trail running shoes for day hiking in CO. They're much more comfortable- and if you get the right pair, they have much better grip on the soles. It looks like TNF and Nike tend to have the better gripping soles. I have a pair of Nike (can't remember which ones, btu they're a couple years old now) that have a Goretex outer and I've never had problems with them- and actually wear them in the winter in the snow without problems as well. Boots give more support, but tend to be much heavier and the soles are usually smoother rubber.
post #4 of 16
Limmer Standards.
post #5 of 16

Garmont

I also do a lot of day hiking here in Colorado. Mostly banging on the Colorado 14'ers and high 13'ers, plus lots of stuff in the San Juans. I picked up a pair of Garmont Nagevi two years ago and swear by them. The footbed is excellent. Did El Diente, Sneffels (northface), and Missouri with them this year. Plus, they look pretty cool for a hiking shoe.

Next year I plan on hitting the Sawatch Range and Sangre de Cristos for several hikes. If your interested maybe we could hook up.

KenE
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenE
I also do a lot of day hiking here in Colorado. Mostly banging on the Colorado 14'ers and high 13'ers, plus lots of stuff in the San Juans. I picked up a pair of Garmont Nagevi two years ago and swear by them. The footbed is excellent. Did El Diente, Sneffels (northface), and Missouri with them this year. Plus, they look pretty cool for a hiking shoe.

Next year I plan on hitting the Sawatch Range and Sangre de Cristos for several hikes. If your interested maybe we could hook up.

KenE
that sounds great man! I just moved to Denver last summer, and will be looking to climb some 14ners next summer. One thing though.....those look low cut. I really need ankle support, as I find I twist them around alot on decents....thoughts?
post #7 of 16

Garmont high tops

Garmont also makes some, high topped boots. Look at the Integra.I hiked before, and still do backpacking, in leather Lowa Scouts. I found that I would roll an ankle toward the end of the day. It's counterintuitive, but my experience has been that the stability of the Garmonts, if I'm carrying less than 20 pounds is actually better than the Lowa's. They make another shoe, the Matrix, that I have that is not as good at gripping, but fine on trail and scree, that is even more stable than the Nagevi. That my experience anyway.

Lowa has put out a new boot with a plastic stabilizer that contains the ankle that has had great reviews. I'd look at it.

Be sure to pick up a copy of Gerry Roach's "Colorado's Fourteeners". It's the bible on the peaks. Also, his Colorado Thirteeners is excellent. The peaks south of Breckenridge, the Ten Mile/Mosquito range are a blast. They're all walkups with high trailheads. Lot's of fun with fantastic views.

Looking forward to hiking with you.

Hope they don't throw us out for discussing this. Shhhhh.

KenE
post #8 of 16
Agree with KenE's post above. I climb 14'ers in the off season (wait a minute- I skied 12 months last year, so I didn't have an off season....), and have a pair of Five Ten Guide Almighty's (unfortunately no longer made) that are fantastic. You can actually rock climb in these things, makes class IV stuff easy. It is possible that you might be able to find a pair somewhere on closeout; also suggest you check the Five Ten website. They are only mid height, so if you want more ankle support you may need somehting heavier. REI in Denver has a good selection, and I found the sales staff in the boot department very helpful. I bought my Vasque Alpine's there (heavy duty leather climbing boots, rapidfix crampon compatible- also highly recommended, especially if you have narrow feet. I have found that the Lowas tend to fit a bit wide).
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
what about Salomon boots? Does anyone know if they are of good comfort and quality???
post #10 of 16
ASOLO Boots are awesome. The Asolo Gravity is a great boot. I use that for spring summer and early fall and it never gave me any problems. Was pretty sturdy with a loaded pack on as well. Though I use sidas custom foot beds in my hiking, skiing, and mountaineering boots, which help with foot fatigue etc. etc. greatly!
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefJef
what about Salomon boots? Does anyone know if they are of good comfort and quality???
They're OK. Most of the ones I've had really build up a high sole and further extend the upper behind the heel area, bracketing the tendon. Takes some real getting used to.

I'm on my third pair of 5.10 Guide Almightys and will back up all of dp's statements about them, with 3 caveats:
-the forefoot is very unpadded so when descending with a heavy pack you'd better have other than the stock inserts (sort of kills the scrambling part of it)
-the soles have insanely high traction (C4 rubber) but also leave very distinct carbon smudges indoors. Do not wear them around friends' kitchens.
-the soles are slicker than snot on glare ice.
post #12 of 16

steel shank

DefJef,

Ankle support is good stuff. Also consider whether you want to go with a full length nylon shank or a 3/4 length nylon shank.

That full length shank will support the sole when ascending steep trails and you're relying on the first 1/5 of the boot to support your weight. On descents either length shank will prevent stone bruising when you're putting all your weight on the point of a stone.

I have had Vasque boots in the past 20 years in Colorado's Rockies. Vasque were bought by Red Wing several years ago. I believe their product is still very good. Just in the last three years I switched to Limmer. They're spendy ...but impecable quality. I think the Salomon products are good too.

If you want great service with a shop to choose from a selection of awesome offereings then I would suggest you check these stores:
Mountain Miser
Neptune Mountaineering
REI Flagship store in Denver
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dp
Agree with KenE's post above. I climb 14'ers in the off season (wait a minute- I skied 12 months last year, so I didn't have an off season....), and have a pair of Five Ten Guide Almighty's (unfortunately no longer made) that are fantastic. You can actually rock climb in these things, makes class IV stuff easy. It is possible that you might be able to find a pair somewhere on closeout; also suggest you check the Five Ten website. They are only mid height, so if you want more ankle support you may need somehting heavier. REI in Denver has a good selection, and I found the sales staff in the boot department very helpful. I bought my Vasque Alpine's there (heavy duty leather climbing boots, rapidfix crampon compatible- also highly recommended, especially if you have narrow feet. I have found that the Lowas tend to fit a bit wide).
I've been using the Five Ten Mountain Master for 2 years. They are a low cut but will scramble with awesome performance on the rockiest trails and scree fields. I wouldn't pack with them though. They can also be re-randed like a rock climbing shoe.
post #14 of 16
Who cares what brand as as they FIT ! Try a bunch and don't scrimp.Deal with a shop that allows returns ( if they're not worn outside). Take your time . did I mention that they should fit?
post #15 of 16

.....

They aren't ultra-light trail runners, but my Montrail Torre's last fits me really well, don't feel heavy, and have a wide-feeling footprint for stability when forced to cling onto edges of obstacles..logs/rocks...etc with less than your whole foot. Goretex is good for wateproofness and breathes for July's heat. Guess at one time they had some manufacturing problems, but mine were new last year...and fit well...but I think there are lighter boots...for less boggy environs as Colorado. As mentioned, fit is most everything...get the sizing/flex right, as well as shank...
$.01...
post #16 of 16
just remember that as with ski boots, hiking boots should be fit to your foot.

what others recommend is good for general knowledge of quality, but unless the other person has a foot shaped like yours, their hearty endorsement doesn't mean the boot will fit your foot as well.

I've had great luck with quality/durability from Montrail, Vasque, Asolo, Merrell.

my regular every day shoe is a burly trail runner/low hiker from Montrail called the "Kalahari," and I wear it whenever I'm hiking or doing trail cutting/maintenance work. it's not quite as sturdy as a full boot, less ankle support obviously, but the underfoot support and midsole cushion durability have been excellent. these are the first pair of Montrail shoes I've used, and I'd go with a Montrail shoe or boot again.

be sure to try on boots in a shop where they have downslope ramps to practice heelhold and general fit.
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